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Classical Origins of popular songs

 
 
Reply Fri 6 Mar, 2015 04:24 pm
The song "Our Love" is derived from what classicalcomposer?
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Type: Question • Score: 7 • Views: 2,308 • Replies: 12
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usery
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Mar, 2015 11:32 pm
@Woollcott,
"This is one of a group of songs from the Big Band jazz era that were written as popular adaptations of classical music. This song is based upon the Act 2 love theme, "O nüit divine" from the Charles Gounod opera, Romeo et Juliette."
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layman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Mar, 2015 12:10 am
@Woollcott,
The only classical song I know is "Roll Over Beethoven," by Chuck Berry.
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Mar, 2015 01:11 am
Well, this does say "Classical Origins of popular songs," plural, so here goes. Much of the music of the highly successful Broadway musical (also a west end success in London), Kismet (Lederer and Davis) was based on melodies by the Russian composer Alexander Borodin. In particular, the "Gliding Dance of the Maidens," one of the Polovtsian Dances from the opera Prince Igor became a hit. (This was not the only use of this melody in popular music.) Lederer and Davis used it for "Stranger in Paradise," which became a hit in its own right.



Here, Ann Blyth and Vic Damone do the song "Stranger in Paradise" from the 1955 MGM motion picture Kismet. Vic Damone reprised the performance in a 1957 recording. From the Broadway show, the song was number one in the United States in February, 1954, and in the UK in May, 1955.



Finally, in this recording from Japanese television, the great English soprano Sarah Brightman sings "Stranger in Paradise" to the orchestral score from the Polovtsian Dances.

Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Mar, 2015 01:30 am
"In the Hall of the Mountain King" by the Norwegian composer Edvard Grieg, from the incidental music he composed for Ibsen's play Peer Gynt. The music from that suite has been used extensively, and has been recorded as popular music since at least 1960 when Duke Ellington recorded his "swing" version of many of the melodies.

In particular, "In the Hall of the Mountain King" has been recorded by groups as diverse as The Who (recorded in 1967, it was no released until 1995), Big Brother and the holding company and European groups too numerous to list here.

In this rather grandiose production, Trans-Siberian Orchestra offer their version:



Another part of the Peer Gynt suite was used in the sound track of the animated motion picture Ice Age--"Anitra's Dance" (here adapted for ballet):



If one pays a little attention, one can hear the similarity to "In the Hall of the Mountain King."
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usery
 
  1  
Reply Sat 7 Mar, 2015 02:50 am


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Melodia/List_of_popular_songs_based_on_classical_music
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izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2015 07:19 am
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hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Mar, 2015 05:22 pm
wikipdedia wrote:

The song is often regarded as being derived from Johann Sebastian Bach's well-known "Air on the G String".[21] The similarity is referred to in the 1982 play The Real Thing by Tom Stoppard and 1991 film The Commitments. However, the song has been linked to other works by Bach. Dutch author Maarten 't Hart calls "A Whiter Shade of Pale" an "original adaptation" of the sinfonia from Bach's Ich steh mit einem Fuß im Grabe, BWV 156 (which has a similar melody to the "Air on the G String"). The stepwise bass motion of the song's Hammond organ obbligatto is close to the "Air on a G String", but Fisher has acknowledged Bach's "Sleepers, Wake!" as an inspiration for the ornamentation.[22]

The music also borrows ideas from "When a Man Loves a Woman" by Percy Sledge,[23] who has covered "A Whiter Shade of Pale".



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bobbobwhite
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Feb, 2016 01:37 pm
@Setanta,
You seem to have a good storehouse of classical information so try this one. What classical piece is the 1959 Arthur Lyman beautiful piano hit, It's So Right To Love, derived from? For research, you can hear it on YouTube or see a TV commercial with the piece playing in the background. It shows a Cadillac SUV maneuvering through a herd of cows on a big city street. This one is tough. Good luck. Please reply ASAP with the correct answer for bonus brownie points.
bobbobwhite
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Mar, 2016 11:40 am
@bobbobwhite,
Found the answer myself..........Chopin's Nocturne No 2 in E Flat Major, Op. 9.

Incredibly sensitive and moving. Best original reproduction when played on a 19th Century Pleyel grand, but Rubinstein or Barenboim do it great justice. Poon is too mechanical, IMO. but technically perfect.
0 Replies
 
ilikeyou
 
  0  
Reply Thu 31 Mar, 2016 02:33 pm
@Woollcott,
I listen again Eric Carmen - All By MySelf
  The verse is based on the second movement (Adagio sostenuto) of Sergei Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Opus 18.
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Kevbyrne
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Nov, 2016 12:21 pm
OK so you know the start of the original star trek TV show theme?
It starts off with a little four chord tune before the main bit kicks in. I know I've heard that before in some pretty famous piece of classical music but I can't put my finger on it.
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InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Nov, 2016 12:47 pm
mark
0 Replies
 
 

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