19
   

Black men and the police

 
 
FBM
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Oct, 2014 09:42 pm
@giujohn,
Blah blah blah. You didn't provide squat with regards to credible evidence. You just posted something that sounds good to you, ie, opinionated rhetoric. You know, it's easy to predict what you're going to say. You've made your opinion clear. Opinions are cheap. So, anyway. Got any evidence for this conspiracy you claim exists?
FBM
 
  3  
Reply Tue 14 Oct, 2014 06:55 am
Hmm. The evidence is piling up. Practically every news source is pointing to a problem. There's something called the "preponderance of evidence" that only the most jilted, wilfully ignorant and blinkered could deny:

Quote:
Yes, It's Legal To Film The Cops -- And What's Been Filmed In Recent Months Is Appalling
The Huffington Post | By Christopher Mathias

NEW YORK -- It's becoming clearer and clearer that smartphones have ushered in a new era of police accountability. Since mid-July, when a bystander on Staten Island filmed the death of Eric Garner in a prohibited police chokehold, at least eight other unsettling videos, most of them captured by smartphone, have emerged showing instances of apparent excessive force by NYPD officers. Four such videos have appeared this month alone.

Although police might intimidate bystanders into thinking otherwise, it's perfectly legal to film the cops -- not only in New York, but everywhere in the U.S. -- as long as you don't get in their way. Donna Lieberman, executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union, encourages people to keep using their phones to film troubling police incidents. The more people who post these videos online, she said, the more likely it is that other people will reach for their own phones when they see cops doing something questionable.

"When police wrongdoing is captured on videotape, it makes the public understand what has happened and why we need to hold the police accountable, and that we need changes in the way police do business," Lieberman told The Huffington Post.

"Nobody would have believed what happened to Rodney King if it hadn't been caught on videotape," she added, referring to the man who was brutally beaten by Los Angeles cops in 1991, leading to months of protests. "The same is true for Eric Garner."

Lieberman also argued that the modern-day proliferation of video is actually good news for police officers.

"It's ready-made training material, and sometimes it's a ready-made defense against wrongful accusation," she said. "It should protect good cops and hold accountable those cops who fundamentally disrespect the rights and laws they're supposed to protect."

On July 17, NYPD officer Daniel Pantaleo put Garner, a father of six and grandfather of two, in a chokehold during an arrest for selling untaxed cigarettes on a Staten Island sidewalk. Bystander Ramsey Orta filmed the arrest. The video shows Garner, who had asthma, repeatedly screaming "I can't breathe!" before his body goes limp.

"Twenty years ago, Ernest Sayon, right in that same district, died," the Rev. Al Sharpton later said at Garner's funeral, referring to another Staten Island man who died at the hands of the NYPD in 1994. "We marched then. But there's a difference this time. This time, there was a video!"

That video, and the others that have emerged since, have raised serious questions about what's going on at the NYPD -- such as:

Why are officers still using chokeholds to apprehend suspects, even though the maneuver is prohibited by the NYPD patrol guide?

On July 14, Ronald Johns, 22, allegedly entered a New York subway station without paying a fare. When he resisted arrest, cops pepper-sprayed him and put him in a chokehold:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jfsSKC6k0YA#t=46

Chokeholds are dangerous and often deadly, yet from 2009 to 2013, the city's Civilian Complaint Review Board received more than 1,000 complaints about them. Below is a video, also from July, that shows an officer appearing to put Rosan Miller in a chokehold during an arrest for illegally grilling outside her home in East New York, Brooklyn. Miller, 27, was seven months pregnant at the time.

Which leads to another question: How are officers trained to deal with pregnant women, anyway?

Here's a cop slamming visibly pregnant Sandra Amezquita to the ground.

http://youtube/ur0V1bMvj1k

This video is from mid-September, when Amezquita tried to intervene in the arrest of her son outside a restaurant in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. She alleges that officers also beat her belly with a baton.

The NYPD didn't respond to a request for comment from The Huffington Post about how officers are told to treat pregnant women. A copy of the department's patrol guide says that "when possible," electric devices like a Taser "should not be used on children, the elderly, obviously pregnant females, the frail, [or] against subjects operating or riding on any moving device or vehicle." The guide also tells officers, "If possible, avoid using pepper spray on persons who appear to be in frail health, young children, women believed to be pregnant, or persons with known respiratory conditions."

Also in September, and also in Sunset Park, police officers threw fruit vendor Jonathan Daza, 22, to the ground after reportedly telling him to pack up his table and clear the area. Once Daza was on the ground, Officer Vincent Ciardiello kicked him in the back, apparently without provocation. Ciardiello was later suspended.

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/video?autoStart=true&topVideoCatNo=default&clipId=10596205

Daza's encounter is just one recent example of New York police appearing to use excessive force on young men of color, a pattern that has led community leaders to ask, repeatedly: Are cops unfairly targeting young black and Latino men for petty crimes? (Statistics certainly suggest that they are.) Below is a video of 17-year-old Marcel Hamer allegedly getting punched unconscious by a cop in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn.

http://youtube/TL-wqpy56tI


According to Marcel's lawyers, the incident took place in June. The cop had accused Marcel of smoking marijuana, though Marcel's attorneys maintain that it was only a cigarette.

Below is footage of a cop in Brooklyn's Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood appearing to hit 16-year-old marijuana suspect Kahreem Tribble in the face with a gun. Before the cop hits him, Kahreem can be seen with his arms raised in surrender.

http://bcove.me/zsk7w7qp

There is also video of 23-year-old Santiago Hernandez apparently getting beaten by a group of officers in the Bronx, an incident that reportedly happened in mid-August.

http://youtube/nBikchOgkDI

So despite all these videos, and despite the NYPD reminding its officers this summer, why do some cops still not know that it's perfectly legal to film police behavior?

http://youtube/4S9-gCl60q4

The video above shows an NYPD school safety officer breaking the camera of an NY1 reporter who had been trying to interview students. (It should be noted that when a different group of cops got to the scene, they informed the safety officers that the NY1 crew was within its rights to film police and to interview students on a public sidewalk.)

The NYCLU has a "Stop and Frisk Watch" app that you can download here, though Lieberman cautioned that anyone who tries to film police activity is taking a risk.

"It's important that they not insinuate themselves into what's going on," she said. "You can film, but you can't interfere with police activities. I think that people have to be discreet, because there are many officers still who don't understand their obligation to respect the rights of the public to take pictures."


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/13/film-the-cops_n_5967008.html?ncid=fcbklnkushpmg00000063
giujohn
 
  -2  
Reply Tue 14 Oct, 2014 02:39 pm
@FBM,
Conspiracy??? Dont try to change the converstion with blatant lies. I never said anything about conspiracies...infact there is no conspiracy...IT"S JUST YOU dumb ass.

The evidence of your agenda is illustrated in your recent post whereby you ridiculously assert that the cop had to have shot the doper cause there wasnt any stippling and in fact no stippling along with GSR around the wound PROVES that it was a contact wound that would have been easy for the doper to do.

So if my evidence isnt "credible", yours is? Dont make me laugh asshole. At least I use reason and logic and 20+ years of experience and training.
You use one sided emotionalism and form your "evidence" accordingly.
Your as clear as grain alcohol and your rhetoric is just as mind numbing
Your one step below pond scum Mr. race baiter
0 Replies
 
giujohn
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 14 Oct, 2014 03:14 pm
@FBM,
Quote:
On July 14, Ronald Johns, 22, allegedly entered a New York subway station without paying a fare. When he resisted arrest, cops pepper-sprayed him and put him in a chokehold:


Hey asshole you posted this...tell us what the officers did wrong??? (your about evidence lets hear it)

Quote:
Here's a cop slamming visibly pregnant Sandra Amezquita to the ground.

You posted this one as well...the question here is...why is a pregant woman resisting arrest? If she doesnt have any concern for her baby the officer should do what to arrest her? Lets here from you. You're big on posting this crap lets see if you can justify it.

Quote:
Below is footage of a cop in Brooklyn's Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood appearing to hit 16-year-old marijuana suspect Kahreem Tribble in the face with a gun. Before the cop hits him, Kahreem can be seen with his arms raised in surrender.


Hey liar..you posted this. The video CLEARLY shows the officers gun is still in his holster. What is the purpose of posting this lie?

Quote:
There is also video of 23-year-old Santiago Hernandez apparently getting beaten by a group of officers in the Bronx, an incident that reportedly happened in mid-August.


You posted this...showing a man who admitts he resisted arrest then is complaining because officers used force. Laughable

What you seem to be advocating is that all black people should always resist arrest, knowing that officers will have to use force to make the arrest.
I dont think you are a freind to the black man. Just the opposite. I think the evidence shows that by encouraging them to resist arrest you are hoping these blacks are killed or injured. I think you're a ******* racisist of the worst kind. You obviously hate black people or you wouldnt be desperately trying to get them killed. Someone who has the black man's interest at heart would be telling them to NOT resist arrest and be alive to SUE the police if they acted improperly. You seem to want them dead.
WHY IS THAT???
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Tue 14 Oct, 2014 03:57 pm
@FBM,
All that irrefutable evidence and yet the perpetrators walk in most instances.
giujohn
 
  0  
Reply Tue 14 Oct, 2014 04:38 pm
@edgarblythe,
No, the perpetrators were arrested.
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  3  
Reply Tue 14 Oct, 2014 05:55 pm
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

All that irrefutable evidence and yet the perpetrators walk in most instances.


Worse, many of them get a paid vacation, then return to work. What blows my mind as much as that is how given that practically the whole country recognizes the problem, including the President, there are some people who are still mired in irrational denialism about it. Derp. (not naming names, but...nudge nudge, wink wink).

http://i1330.photobucket.com/albums/w561/hapkido1996/35_zps521e2402.gif
giujohn
 
  0  
Reply Tue 14 Oct, 2014 07:15 pm
@FBM,
Quote:
practically the whole country


The WHOLE country Chicken Little? All 322,583,006? Why not say the whole world...or better yet the whole universe?

FBM
 
  2  
Reply Tue 14 Oct, 2014 07:19 pm
@giujohn,
I said "practically" specifically to allow for a few denialist wingnuts... Wink
giujohn
 
  0  
Reply Tue 14 Oct, 2014 07:39 pm
@FBM,
prac·ti·cal·ly


/ˈpraktək(ə)lē/


adverb

adverb: practically



1. virtually; almost.

"the risk of default was practically zero"

synonyms:

almost, (very) nearly, virtually, just about, all but, more or less, as good as, to all intents and purposes, verging on, bordering on

FBM
 
  0  
Reply Tue 14 Oct, 2014 07:49 pm
@giujohn,
Good to see you're studying. Keep it up.
0 Replies
 
snood
 
  3  
Reply Sun 30 Nov, 2014 09:23 am
@FBM,
FBM wrote:

edgarblythe wrote:

All that irrefutable evidence and yet the perpetrators walk in most instances.


Worse, many of them get a paid vacation, then return to work. What blows my mind as much as that is how given that practically the whole country recognizes the problem, including the President, there are some people who are still mired in irrational denialism about it. Derp. (not naming names, but...nudge nudge, wink wink).

http://i1330.photobucket.com/albums/w561/hapkido1996/35_zps521e2402.gif


I think this is the thing that causes me to see red and go speechless whenever this topic of the inequality in application of force by police against black men is discussed. There is often someone present who has the attitude of "I don't see any evidence that there is any problem with how police treat black men", and even "if they weren't doing anything wrong they wouldn't have anything to worry about". It's not that there are differences of opinion about the severity of the problem or of the potential solutions to the problem. It's the fact that so many motherf*ckers deny the existence of any problem at all.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sun 30 Nov, 2014 09:53 am
It will take a movement as strong as the Civil Rights Movement of the 60s to make many changes. And even that may not level the whole playing field. When dark skinned people become such a majority that they can make and enforce laws, then, maybe.
FBM
 
  2  
Reply Sun 30 Nov, 2014 07:24 pm
@edgarblythe,
Demographically, that day may not be so far away. Realistically, though, it's getting people to the polls. I have a feeling that there's a lot of public sentiment that's not reflected by our leadership simply because on those who vote have a real say in who those leaders are.
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sun 30 Nov, 2014 07:43 pm
@FBM,
At present, you are probably correct. It takes a spark - Ferguson may not be that spark. But it has to come soon.
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Mon 1 Dec, 2014 06:47 am
I don't see a good reason for either verbal or physical aggression here:

0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Mon 1 Dec, 2014 08:49 am
Somebody else just now tried to post this and blew the YouTube link. Just correcting the tags:

0 Replies
 
snood
 
  3  
Reply Fri 14 Aug, 2015 06:09 pm
Thought I'd use this old thread of mine to bump this story up. There's a chance they could convene another grand jury to try the policeman who killed Eric Garner. I sure hope they do. The man who choked Eric Garner to death on National television has not missed a day of work. Justice was surely not done for Eric Garner.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/new-york-grand-jury-eric-garner_55cdfe6ce4b07addcb42ac19?kvcommref=mostpopular

The sole recourse Garner's family could likely expect was a multimillion-dollar payout from the city to settle any wrongful death claim. (The city settled with the family last month for $5.9 million.)

But in the year since Garner's death, there has been another, curiously unexplored alternative to get justice: pressure local officials to simply convene another grand jury. In other words, if the case really was mishandled -- as so many protesters, politicians and pundits have suggested -- there can be a do-over.

"Far too little attention has been focused on another option: the discretion the current law gives to Staten Island’s court and district attorney’s office to order a new grand jury in the Garner case," Mark Zuckerman, president of The Century Foundation, wrote Thursday in an editorial on the prominent think tank's website.
0 Replies
 
snood
 
  3  
Reply Sun 16 Aug, 2015 05:42 am
http://api.theweek.com/sites/default/files/0807Wasserman_PoliceBrutality.jpg?resize=807x807
bobsal u1553115
 
  3  
Reply Sun 16 Aug, 2015 07:10 am
@snood,
When they're shooting children to death with in literally seconds of contact, there is no effective strategy for survival.

There is no chance any sort of individual action will guarantee safety and the African American community has little better chance to solve it, either. We have to keep awareness up and help generate a national will to reform policing on a national level.
0 Replies
 
 

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