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Mark Twain books and quotes

 
 
Reply Thu 20 May, 2004 09:31 am
I love Mark Twain. I have read a couple of his books, the last one being "Roughing It". Are you a Twain fan? What's your favorite book, or quote, from this national treasure?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 2,848 • Replies: 27
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panzade
 
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Reply Thu 20 May, 2004 09:34 am
Aw shucks! Now you've gone and got me interested in returning to Twain. My reading list is SO backed up.
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kickycan
 
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Reply Thu 20 May, 2004 09:38 am
Yeah, mine too, but I love the guy!
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Noddy24
 
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Reply Thu 20 May, 2004 11:53 am
I find it difficult to choose between Huckleberry Finn and Life on the Mississippi.

Both books speak of rivers in a way that I understand and envy.
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kickycan
 
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Reply Thu 20 May, 2004 12:15 pm
Have not read Life on the Mississippi. Loved Huck Finn. I might try that one after I finish Frankenstein, which I'm in the middle of right now.

I'm also interested to know if anyone's read or knows anything about either "The Bible According to Mark Twain" or "The Diaries of Adam and Eve". Or are those just different titles of the same book?
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Acquiunk
 
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Reply Thu 20 May, 2004 12:35 pm
IMHO Life on the Mississippi is Twain's best book,
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Acquiunk
 
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Reply Thu 20 May, 2004 12:42 pm
kickycan wrote:
I'm also interested to know if anyone's read or knows anything about either "The Bible According to Mark Twain" or "The Diaries of Adam and Eve". Or are those just different titles of the same book?


The Bible According to Mark Twain is a collection of short stories that include The Diaries of Adam and Eve, Passages from Methuselash's Diary, Captain Stormfield's Visit to heaven and a number of other works.
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kickycan
 
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Reply Thu 20 May, 2004 12:44 pm
Thanks for the info, Acquiunk.
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Noddy24
 
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Reply Thu 20 May, 2004 01:53 pm
Thanks to Great Google:

http://www.american-buddha.com/twain.bib.1.htm#A

Acquiunk--

I have no sense of direction and Mark Twain's thoughts on the unfairness of memorizing and mastering an ever-variable river are a comfort every time I'm lost.

I love belonging to respectable peer groups.
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Acquiunk
 
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Reply Thu 20 May, 2004 02:04 pm
That book was originally a serries of articles for either Harpers or the Atlantic that were expanded into book form. What I always liked about it was his observations of the then present coupled with his memories of his own and others past. Twain was at his best when he was observing other people and I've always thought that his travelogue writings such as, Innocents Abroad, Roughing It, and Life on the Mississippi were his best works.
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coluber2001
 
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Reply Thu 20 May, 2004 02:10 pm
kickycan: When you finish reading "Frankenstein," I wish you'd start a thread on the meaning of that book. I think it's a morality tale worth discussing, especially since the movies have treated it as just a horror story.

There was a triptych of movies of Mark Twain stories produced some years ago that I saw on TV. One was "Life on the Mississippi."

Another was something like, "History of a private campaign," about a group of boys in Missouri who form a small band of rebel soldiers, under the direction of a fanatic adult, during the Civil war. It's hilarious but ends tragically.

The third was "Innocents Abroad."

I don't know if any of these are available on video, but I found them all to be excellent and well worth the search.
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kickycan
 
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Reply Thu 20 May, 2004 02:33 pm
Coluber, I think that is a great idea. There are all sorts of great moral implications in that book. I am surprised so far at how different this story is to what I have seen in the movies.

So I have to agree with the people here who liked "roughing it". I really liked that book a lot. I think I'll have to check out one of his other travelogue-type books soon.
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kickycan
 
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Reply Thu 20 May, 2004 02:46 pm
"I didn't attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying that I approved of it."

I saw this on a Twain quotes website, and I love it. I think I might have heard it before, but I can't remember: does anyone know whose funeral he's talking about here? Or where it's from?
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jespah
 
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Reply Thu 20 May, 2004 04:23 pm
"Put all your eggs in one basket and watch that basket." Puddinhead Wilson
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InfraBlue
 
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Reply Thu 20 May, 2004 09:23 pm
I really enjoy The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County. I first read it in high school. It speaks volumes about underhandedness in the world.

Damn, now I've got to pull that story out and re-read it.

I first picked up Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus when I was a freshman in high school, but the early 19th cent. writing style turned me off. I picked it up again in my senior year, and was just amazed at how Shelley made the golem a superman--super intelligent and super strength--who was shunned . . . well, I won't ruin it for those who haven't read it, like I've done on some of the film threads. Oops.

Anyway, the book is relevant today given the strides in genetic engineering in the world today. What are the implications of genetically engineered human beings?
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rosborne979
 
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Reply Fri 21 May, 2004 12:20 pm
I liked Twain's _The Mysterious Stranger_, which is available online.
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boomerang
 
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Reply Thu 3 Apr, 2008 07:03 pm
I came across a rather nasty but funny little swipe about Twain not long ago. I think it might have been in Esquire. If your friend reads Esquire I'll backtrack but I offer no guarantees.
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Shapeless
 
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Reply Thu 3 Apr, 2008 08:04 pm
At present, my favorite is A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. The joust in Chapter 29 makes me laugh aloud every time I read it.
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roger
 
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Reply Thu 3 Apr, 2008 08:22 pm
Tough call. I suppose I would go with Life on the Mississipi, but A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court was fascinating, if only for exploring the day to day thought processes of the time. I loved A Tramp Abroad but sometimes I suspect Thomas and I are the only ones to have read it. The Gilded Age was as informative as it was dreary. I might suggest it for education over entertainment.
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kickycan
 
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Reply Thu 3 Apr, 2008 08:26 pm
boomerang wrote:
I came across a rather nasty but funny little swipe about Twain not long ago. I think it might have been in Esquire. If your friend reads Esquire I'll backtrack but I offer no guarantees.


I would absolutely love to see it, but please don't go to too much trouble. In any case, thanks!
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