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What are the effects of Novocain?

 
 
Linkat
 
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 10:05 am
Anyone know? Are there different types of Novocain that cause different results? How do you react with a shot or two of this stuff?

Recently I had a root canal treatment. Never had one before so I really did not know what to expect. The one odd thing was immediately after getting my Novocain shots, I got very relaxed. Physically I felt my muscles relaxing and I almost felt like falling asleep – which I would have had I not had someone rooting around in my mouth.

I’ve had Novocain shots before for fillings or similar minor dental work, but I have never had such a reaction before. My only prior reaction was the expected numbing of the area. I asked the dentist about it and he simply said some people get jittery like having caffeine – everyone reacts differently.
 
Region Philbis
 
  2  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 10:19 am
@Linkat,

possibly you were given a larger dose than in the past, thus causing a more pronounced reaction...
0 Replies
 
Romeo Fabulini
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 11:23 am
If you've had no sleepy reaction to novocaine in the past, it was probably just a one-off reaction.
Incidentally according to this website dentists stopped using novocaine 30 years ago and switched to other types that are more effective and with less risk of side effects, so just for the record it might be a good idea to ask your dentist next time exactly what he's using.

http://directionsindentistry.net/dental-mythbuster-4-dentists-still-use-novocaine/
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 11:35 am
@Romeo Fabulini,
Probably I just assumed that it was --- hadn't really heard differently. But I did ask him during my consult if it was a just a local anesthesia so I could drive afterwards. I never made mention what kind and all he asked after I got my shots was if I was feeling numb.

I just never had such an immediate relaxing feeling - it was like all over my body right down to my toes. It actually made the experience pretty much stress free.
Romeo Fabulini
 
  0  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 11:51 am
@Linkat,
I've never had a reaction at the dentists myself except that I once made a fool of myself years ago by fainting in front of everybody on the floor of his waiting room after he'd given me the injection in my gum! (dunno if it was novocaine)
I blame the faint on his place being like a crowded noisy cattle market, the chairs were all taken and I had to stand around like many others waiting for the injection to take effect. A kid also fainted a couple of minutes after me, so I wasn't the only one..Smile
At least I think mine was a faint but on second thoughts from what you said it might have been a sleepy reaction to the drug like you had.
I quickly recovered and felt fine and relaxed, and he whipped out my tooth and I went home feeling fine..Smile
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 11:57 am
@Romeo Fabulini,
What the heck kind of facility was that? I have never been in a waiting room between receiving novocaine and the actual treatment. Sounds kind of like the way we might treat livestock - but not pets.
Romeo Fabulini
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 12:29 pm
@roger,
Ah, but this is ENGLAND mate, where most medical and dental treatment is FREE! As a result, many doctors and dentists are sloppy and uncaring because they subconsciously think- "The patients are getting it all free of charge so we'll treat them like muck and they'll just have to put up with it"..Smile
luismtzzz
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 12:33 pm
@Linkat,
There is only one type of Novocain. Although there are different brand names for Procaine health regulation assure that the concentrations of medication and the biopharmacolgy of the brands are all equal.

You have two theories. Rather you experienced a physical overreaction to the drug, or you had a vasovagal reaction.

All the anesthesics change their effect depending of amyriad of situations. The doseage for example can induce local effect during a wound reparation, in higher dosages all of them can cause drowsiness and even cardiac effets (of course this last one occurs with high intravenous administration. Tiredness, stress, fatigue, alcohol compsumtpion may cause a higher effect of an anesthesic. Stimulants, anxiety, infections, can cause a lower effect of the drugs. The doses used for a dental procedure are really low to cause a dangerous effect. Maybe your body reacted unappropiatedly in that precise situation.

The second option i think was the culprit. And i think Romeo experienced exactly the same. It is called vasovagal reaction.

Quote:
A vasovagal episode or vasovagal response or vasovagal attack (also called neurocardiogenic syncope) is a malaise mediated by the vagus nerve. When it leads to syncope or "fainting", it is called a vasovagal syncope, which is the most common type of fainting. Vasovagal syncope more commonly affects young adults.

There are different syncope syndromes which all fall under the umbrella of vasovagal syncope. The common element among these conditions is the central mechanism leading to loss of consciousness. The differences among them are in the factors that trigger this mechanism.

Episodes of vasovagal response are typically recurrent, and usually occur when the predisposed person is exposed to a specific trigger. Prior to losing consciousness, the individual frequently experiences early signs or symptoms such as lightheadedness, nausea, the feeling of being extremely hot or cold (accompanied by sweating), ringing in the ears (tinnitus), an uncomfortable feeling in the heart, fuzzy thoughts, confusion, a slight inability to speak/form words (sometimes combined with mild stuttering), weakness and visual disturbances such as lights seeming too bright, fuzzy or tunnel vision, black cloud-like spots in vision, and a feeling of nervousness can occur as well. The symptoms last for a few seconds before the loss of consciousness (if it is lost), which typically happens when the person is sitting up or standing. When sufferers pass out, they fall down (unless this is impeded) and, when in this position, effective blood flow to the brain is immediately restored, allowing the person to regain consciousness; if the person does not fall into a fully flat, supine position, and the head remains elevated above the trunk, a seizure may result from the blood's inability to return quickly to the brain. Fainting occurs with the loss of oxygen to the brain.

The autonomic nervous system's physiologic state (see below) leading to loss of consciousness may persist for several minutes, so:

If sufferers try to sit or stand when they wake up, they may pass out again
The person may be nauseated, pale, and sweaty for several minutes or hours

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasovagal_response


I have personally seen it many times. Is the typical patient that seems to be perfectly OK after a common intramuscular inyection, and suddenly while walking out of the clinic he or she faints. It is very common and normal. Other triggers could be a senil patinet with constipation that faints on the toilet while trying to poop. Or a girl that faints while standing in a crowded church on a hot sunday.

luismtzzz
 
  2  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 12:38 pm
@Romeo Fabulini,
Quote:
Ah, but this is ENGLAND mate, where most medical and dental treatment is FREE! As a result, many doctors and dentists are sloppy and uncaring because they subconsciously think- "The patients are getting it all free of charge so we'll treat them like muck and they'll just have to put up with it"..


I am intrigued by this. I had always tought that England has a fisrt world medical service system, that makes other first world countries feel jealous.

I mean, in Mexico we have a socilized system that also provides free health service to workers and their families. I actually work on this system as a primary care giver. You really picture your health services as really crappy.

Even when Mexican social health services are almost technically broke they do not seem as bad as the way you describe yours. Do you have an image?
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 12:47 pm
@Linkat,
Actually, just a couple of shots for any work on teeth is not so bad compared to having peridontal work done. The doc gives you about 20 shots of novocain and some can hit nerves. I just completed my second peridontal surgery two months ago, and I'm seeing the doc next Monday for him to measure my gum depth. If you don't want to lose your teeth, take good care of them; have regular teeth cleaning and inspection by your dentist.
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 01:11 pm
@roger,
Yeah I was thinking the same thing. Once I was "seated in the "chair"they give the novacaine or whatever the heck they give you to numb you up - you are leaning back about as comfty as in can be. The dentist or assistant even stays with you (or comes in and out to check on) - I've never had a shot or something like that and kept in the waiting room.

They don't want any accidents like fainting and clocking your head.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 01:17 pm
@luismtzzz,
Umm not sure I can get through all the medical mumbo jumbo (I'm more a finance person) - any way it happened twice as I had to go twice to complete the procedure. Both times I had a similar reaction.

It pretty much lasted the entire time I was there from an hour and a half to two hours. When I got up I felt a bit tired but not overally so -- sort of how you feel after a good nap. I wasn't like weak or anything just like I had a good rest.

It was a pleasant experience (as much so as you can be with crap in your mouth for a couple of hours). I was relaxed and a little drozy only. There was no negative feeling associated with it.
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 01:20 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Yes - I agree and for your overall general health. You can get all sorts of bad things if you don't care for your teeth - bacteria will grow in your mouth and resulting into your body.

My doctor says there are only three things that will guarantee you a longer life (other things may help but not guarantee) - wearing a seatbelt, not smoking, and flossing your teeth.
Miller
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 03:37 pm
@Linkat,
Some prepartions of novocain, used by Massachusetts dentists do contain at least one additional additive . As far as a root canal, I've never experienced any side effects from either the procedure or the injection. Usually, depending on the dentist doing the root canal procedure, the only side effect may be an elevation of the blood pressure.

However, I've noticed that after my GENERAL DENTIST gives me an injection of novcaine ( containing an additive ), there is no increase in blood pressure, and the only effect seems to be a calming ( sedation) effect.

Your response and the duration of this response depends on the amount of novaine+, you've received. With older dentists ( GENERAL DENTISTS), the amount given, may be an overkill, because they're not too experienced in pharmacology or pharmaceutics.

With increased dosage, the sedation effect could last at least 24 hours or longer. But remember, this sedation effect is not due to novocaine itself, but rather due to the additive. If you don't know what's in the novocaine injection, causing the sedation, I'd advise you to avoid driving to and from the dentist. I'd also try to stick with dentists in the 40-50 year old range, who may be more up-to-date than those over 70 years of age.

I'd also be careful if your older dentist is having problems with his/her eyesight, as would be expected at the age of 70 years+.



Miller
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 03:43 pm
@luismtzzz,
I personally don't know any Americans, either in Boston or elsewhere in the US who would go to Mexico for dentistry. I'd rather have a toothache than seek out a dentist in Mexico.
luismtzzz
 
  2  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 04:17 pm
@Miller,
Well i know many Dentist that had made a living attending americans that come to Mexico seeking dental service. Mostly are people that come from the border states.

Dental schools follow american standars in treatment and service. Even if they are not recognized by the US. They are always up to date and use the newest technology.

A simple dental extraction can cost approximatedly from 20 to 35 dollars. A third molar surgery can cost from 120 to 300 dollars, and are done by specialized professionals.

And in social health services the procedures are free.
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 04:44 pm
@roger,
It's about scheduling. If you're about to have a lot of work done they can give someone a check up while the novocaine takes effect. Still, it beats paying.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 04:48 pm
@luismtzzz,
Also, from my association with people (friends) who live in Mexico, they tell me they have great doctors there.
luismtzzz
 
  2  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 05:18 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Indeed. Many specialists do their fellowships on the US and return to Mexico. We follow american procedure alghoritms, and american standars, but with the mexican spirit of service. We are not limited by that rigid fear of law suits or by that blood sucking insurance companies that makes american health services so expensive.

I am considering myself doing my postgraduate studies on the US and then return to my country.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Thu 24 Jul, 2014 05:24 pm
A friend of years ago who was born and raised in Mexico City also went to dental school at the university there. Later on he had a practice in one of the higher end areas of San Fernando Valley (that's part of the Los Angeles area); he had a well regarded practice.

Miller's talk reminds me of what people thought about medical treatment in Mexico fifty years ago or more.
0 Replies
 
 

 
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