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How could we evaluate the demonstration "occupy the wall street"

 
 
Reply Fri 9 May, 2014 08:19 am
How could we evaluate the demonstration. Can we just comment it as the action that against the greedy of those capitalists?
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Type: Question • Score: 3 • Views: 1,206 • Replies: 14
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tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 May, 2014 08:23 am
@Baker zhou,
What are you exactly asking because your question is buried in poor unintelligible English?
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 May, 2014 08:24 am
@Baker zhou,
Could you be asking if the 'Stop Wall Street' demonstrations were effective?
Baker zhou
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 May, 2014 08:29 am
@Ragman,
Yes,and what the demonstration for, actually.
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Fri 9 May, 2014 08:34 am
@Baker zhou,
It depends on what and how you define success.

If gaining publicity raising the public awareness of the ills of Wall Street, they accomplished that to a degree. However, if you define success as changing how Wall Street does its business (poor ethics and a need to tighten regulations curbing their bad business practices), it failed miserably.

Furthermore, this might address some of the financial and institutional failure and changes that still need to be addressed:

From Wikipedia

Wall Street and the Financial Crisis: Anatomy of a Financial Collapse

Wall Street and the Financial Crisis: Anatomy of a Financial Collapse is a report on the financial crisis of 2007–2008 issued on April 13, 2011 by the United States Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. The 639 page report was issued under the chairmanship of Senators Carl Levin and Tom Coburn, and is colloquially known as the Levin-Coburn Report. After conducting “over 150 interviews and depositions, consulting with dozens of government, academic, and private sector experts” found that “the crisis was not a natural disaster, but the result of high risk, complex financial products, undisclosed conflicts of interest; and the failure of regulators, the credit rating agencies, and the market itself to rein in the excesses of Wall Street.” [

In an interview, Senator Levin noted that “The overwhelming evidence is that those institutions deceived their clients and deceived the public, and they were aided and abetted by deferential regulators and credit ratings agencies who had conflicts of interest.”

By the end of their two-year investigation, the staff amassed 56 million pages of memos, documents, prospectuses and e-mails. The report, which contains 2,800 footnotes and references thousands of internal documents focused on four major areas of concern regarding the failure of the financial system: high risk mortgage lending, failure of regulators to stop such practices, inflated credit ratings, and abuses of the system by investment banks. The Report also issued several recommendations for future action regarding each of these categories.

The Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission released its report on the financial crisis in January 2011.

Baker zhou
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 May, 2014 08:35 am
@tsarstepan,
Do you think your "answer" is so acrid?
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 May, 2014 09:03 am
@Baker zhou,
Sorry but I have no idea what you mean here by your use of the word acrid. Acrid means "having an irritatingly strong and unpleasant taste or smell". No, my answer doesn't have any smell.
Baker zhou
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 May, 2014 09:09 am
@Ragman,
In your country, I mean, in America, what do common people think of America?
Baker zhou
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 May, 2014 09:15 am
@Ragman,
oh, I don't mean your answer is acrid........It's for another guy. I'm sorry for your misunderstanding. Your answer is great and comprehensive, thank you very much.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 May, 2014 10:17 am
@Baker zhou,
Not meaning criticism, regardless for whom it was meant, the word acrid is misused there. For example, the word acerbic (meaning cutting, sharp, or sarcastic) could be an appropriate choice.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 May, 2014 10:24 am
@Baker zhou,
Once again...no unfair criticism is intended but that question is far too broadly worded to be answered well. Now if you were to narrow it down a bit more narrowly to a question such as "what do Americans feel about the 'Stop Wall Street" demonstrations, it might be better answered and invite more participation.

Can you narrow your question down?
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 May, 2014 10:56 am
@Baker zhou,
Go to the source - http://www.occupytogether.org/

They still exist, but they're awfully unfocused.
0 Replies
 
sunyata
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 10 May, 2014 01:50 am
@Baker zhou,
manifestation of social nihilism in a relatively passive form
0 Replies
 
sunyata
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 10 May, 2014 01:52 am
@tsarstepan,
i can understand it, maybe your mental faculty is lacking.
or you just committed a red herring
0 Replies
 
sunyata
 
  0  
Reply Sat 10 May, 2014 01:55 am
@Ragman,
narrow minds
narrow quesions
0 Replies
 
 

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