7
   

Weight of the soul?

 
 
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Feb, 2014 01:20 pm
@neologist,
Read all the links you sent... Still don't see a correlation between beast and soul. I'm not trying to disrespect you, only to understand .
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Feb, 2014 01:25 pm
@Germlat,
I don't have a Hebrew text ready to show you the word 'nephesh' (breather). But the first definition of 'nephesh' in the link I provided is 'soul'.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Feb, 2014 02:17 pm
@neologist,
that's all circular reasoning.
"It iis what I say it is because some guys had a word that perhaps ( if you look at it in the right light) could have been SYNONYM from another language .
neologist
 
  2  
Reply Mon 24 Feb, 2014 11:42 pm
@farmerman,
Well, the identity of soul with self is in harony with Solomon's observatiion at Ecclesiastes 9:5 that the dead are "conscious of nothing at all."
raprap
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Feb, 2014 05:39 am
@Zarathustra,
One mole of air is about 29 grams @ STP this is 22.4 liters--so 21 grams would be about 16 and a quarter liter.

Rap
Zarathustra
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Feb, 2014 10:47 am
@raprap,
Yes you are correct. As I noted the values were off the top of my head. I had 10g for seven liters. For this type of question I figured ballpark was close enough.
0 Replies
 
RushPoint
 
  2  
Reply Thu 27 Feb, 2014 06:16 pm
@kromur71405,
I do not believe the air in your lungs would weigh 21 grams. Although, I do know a fully charged car battery weighs roughly 0.2 grams more than a dead battery! energy has mass, something to think about!
raprap
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Feb, 2014 05:12 am
@RushPoint,
0.2 g is a buncha buncha energy by E=mc^2 . A lot more than the 1 kwhr contained in the average fully charged car battery.

Think about it.

Rap

Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Feb, 2014 05:33 am
Your doctor's methodology in 1901 was seriously flawed. When people (and animals) die, they also evacuate their bowels and the urinary bladder. One could allege that the weight of urine and feces would still be weighed, but in the case of the bowels, that would entail a loss of gases from the intestines, too. Warm urine would also evaporate quickly. I suggest it was an idiotic experiment from the outset.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Feb, 2014 05:34 am
@neologist,
Harony? Is that like a barony, only higher? Just how high are you when you post this drivel?
RushPoint
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Feb, 2014 07:47 am
@raprap,
never actually did the math myself, read it somewhere. ya I should know better lol, I'm thinking what I read was probably more like .002 mg, but this even seems high when I think about it
0 Replies
 
RushPoint
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Feb, 2014 08:24 am
@Setanta,
Duncan MacDougall managed (apparently overcoming any ethical qualms over human experimentation) to put six dying people on a bed equipped with sensitive springs, and claimed to have observed a sudden loss of weight – about ¾ of an ounce – at the exact moment of their death. Having reasoned that such loss could not be explained by bowel movements or evaporation, he concluded he must have measured the weight of the soul. A follow-up experiment also showed that dogs (which were healthy, so they were probably poisoned on purpose by the good doctor) don't seem to suffer the same sort of loss, therefore they don't have souls (sorry, you canine lovers).

This is an excellent example of where pseudoscience and belief go wrong, on a variety of levels. Let us start with MacDougall's claim itself: it turns out that his data were decidedly unreliable by any decent scientific standard. Not only was the experiment never repeated (by either MaDougall or anyone else), but his own notes (published in American Medicine in March 1907) show that of the six data points, two had to be discarded as “of no value”; two recorded a weight drop, followed by additional losses later on (was the soul leaving bit by bit?); one showed a reversal of the loss, then another loss (the soul couldn't make up its mind, leaving, re-entering, then leaving for good); and only one case actually constitutes the basis of the legendary estimate of ¾ of an ounce. With data like these, it's a miracle the paper got published in the first place.

Second, as was pointed out immediately by Dr. Augustus P. Clarke in a rebuttal also published in American Medicine, MacDougall failed to consider another obvious hypothesis: that the weight loss (assuming it was real) was due to evaporation caused by the sudden rise in body temperature that occurs when the blood circulation stops and the blood can no longer be air-cooled by the lungs. This also elegantly explains why the dogs showed no weight loss: as is well known, they cool themselves by panting, not sweating like humans do.
0 Replies
 
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Feb, 2014 06:37 pm
@Setanta,
We all mishpel frum time to time, Set, especially when using a tablet or android phone. I generally ignore such gaffes. (Otherwise farmer would hate me)
0 Replies
 
 

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