11
   

On, Allen, I don't know.

 
 
Thomas
 
  2  
Reply Sun 9 Feb, 2014 04:43 pm
@jespah,
jespah wrote:
Mia is not lookin' good in this, not one bit.

In the interest of full disclosure: Even if it was Woody Allen who didn't look good, I would still give him the Golden-Globe lifetime-achievement award for Annie Hall, Hannah and her Sisters, Crimes and Misdemeanors, Bullets over Broadway, and other great movies. In the same vein, I would still give Roman Polanski a lifetime-achievement award for Chinatown and The Pianist, even though we know he likes 13-year-old girls. Honors are awarded for the art, not the virtues of the person who happened to produce it.
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Feb, 2014 04:47 pm
@jespah,
jespah wrote:
Allen's right to question Ronan's paternity

Farrow is the one who questioned it. Allen is only picking up on it.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Feb, 2014 04:55 pm
Samantha Geimer has some very good points

Quote:
Bitterness and retribution, regret and anger are things that poison you; they do not heal you. We are surrounded by people who may have suffered less or have suffered in ways we cannot imagine. Accept yourself, accept what has happened and how you have handled it. Give no one the authority to judge you and do not judge others in how they have chosen to recover. The last and perhaps most difficult thing: Refrain from jumping to conclusions about the guilt of a person who is accused but not charged with or convicted of a crime. I think we all have a lot of work to do.


http://www.slate.com/articles/double_x/doublex/2014/02/samantha_geimer_to_dylan_farrow_and_other_victims_the_only_thing_you_have.html

Making no evaluation on whether Dylan was abused Geimer essentially says that Dylan is swimming in the wrong pond if she was. This recent flare up between Mia and Woody seems to be as much about Mia trying to launch Ronan's career as it is about Mia (and Dylan?) being pissed that Woody is still being in good enough standing in Hollywood to get awards or of course anything that actually happened to Dylan. There is so much muck here I think we best all ignore it till or unless any new evidence turns up.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Feb, 2014 05:03 pm
@Thomas,
Agree.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Feb, 2014 05:04 pm
@hawkeye10,
If Mia is right about what happened then she failed to protect Dylan and she failed to get Dylans abuser convicted and held accountable. Running over Dylan and taking the lead in bashing Woody at this late date is then yet another disservice to Dylan as she should be running her own life and speaking for herself. This gets back to Geimers message that the first thing abused need to do is take back control of their lives.
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Feb, 2014 08:06 pm
@hawkeye10,
Dylan did speak for herself. Allen's statement was in response to this one, written by Dylan, which had earlier appeared in the NY Times.
Quote:
(A note from Nicholas Kristof: In 1993, accusations that Woody Allen had abused his adoptive daughter, Dylan Farrow, filled the headlines, part of a sensational story about the celebrity split between Allen and his girlfriend, Mia Farrow. This is a case that has been written about endlessly, but this is the first time that Dylan Farrow herself has written about it in public. It’s important to note that Woody Allen was never prosecuted in this case and has consistently denied wrongdoing; he deserves the presumption of innocence. So why publish an account of an old case on my blog? Partly because the Golden Globe lifetime achievement award to Allen ignited a debate about the propriety of the award. Partly because the root issue here isn’t celebrity but sex abuse. And partly because countless people on all sides have written passionately about these events, but we haven’t fully heard from the young woman who was at the heart of them. I’ve written a column about this, but it’s time for the world to hear Dylan’s story in her own words.)

February 1, 2014
An Open Letter From Dylan Farrow
By DYLAN FARROW
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2014/01/31/opinion/dylan-farrow/dylan-farrow-blog480-v3.jpg

What’s your favorite Woody Allen movie? Before you answer, you should know: when I was seven years old, Woody Allen took me by the hand and led me into a dim, closet-like attic on the second floor of our house. He told me to lay on my stomach and play with my brother’s electric train set. Then he sexually assaulted me. He talked to me while he did it, whispering that I was a good girl, that this was our secret, promising that we’d go to Paris and I’d be a star in his movies. I remember staring at that toy train, focusing on it as it traveled in its circle around the attic. To this day, I find it difficult to look at toy trains.

For as long as I could remember, my father had been doing things to me that I didn’t like. I didn’t like how often he would take me away from my mom, siblings and friends to be alone with him. I didn’t like it when he would stick his thumb in my mouth. I didn’t like it when I had to get in bed with him under the sheets when he was in his underwear. I didn’t like it when he would place his head in my naked lap and breathe in and breathe out. I would hide under beds or lock myself in the bathroom to avoid these encounters, but he always found me. These things happened so often, so routinely, so skillfully hidden from a mother that would have protected me had she known, that I thought it was normal. I thought this was how fathers doted on their daughters. But what he did to me in the attic felt different. I couldn’t keep the secret anymore.

When I asked my mother if her dad did to her what Woody Allen did to me, I honestly did not know the answer. I also didn’t know the firestorm it would trigger. I didn’t know that my father would use his sexual relationship with my sister to cover up the abuse he inflicted on me. I didn’t know that he would accuse my mother of planting the abuse in my head and call her a liar for defending me. I didn’t know that I would be made to recount my story over and over again, to doctor after doctor, pushed to see if I’d admit I was lying as part of a legal battle I couldn’t possibly understand. At one point, my mother sat me down and told me that I wouldn’t be in trouble if I was lying – that I could take it all back. I couldn’t. It was all true. But sexual abuse claims against the powerful stall more easily. There were experts willing to attack my credibility. There were doctors willing to gaslight an abused child.

After a custody hearing denied my father visitation rights, my mother declined to pursue criminal charges, despite findings of probable cause by the State of Connecticut – due to, in the words of the prosecutor, the fragility of the “child victim.” Woody Allen was never convicted of any crime. That he got away with what he did to me haunted me as I grew up. I was stricken with guilt that I had allowed him to be near other little girls. I was terrified of being touched by men. I developed an eating disorder. I began cutting myself. That torment was made worse by Hollywood. All but a precious few (my heroes) turned a blind eye. Most found it easier to accept the ambiguity, to say, “who can say what happened,” to pretend that nothing was wrong. Actors praised him at awards shows. Networks put him on TV. Critics put him in magazines. Each time I saw my abuser’s face – on a poster, on a t-shirt, on television – I could only hide my panic until I found a place to be alone and fall apart.

Last week, Woody Allen was nominated for his latest Oscar. But this time, I refuse to fall apart. For so long, Woody Allen’s acceptance silenced me. It felt like a personal rebuke, like the awards and accolades were a way to tell me to shut up and go away. But the survivors of sexual abuse who have reached out to me – to support me and to share their fears of coming forward, of being called a liar, of being told their memories aren’t their memories – have given me a reason to not be silent, if only so others know that they don’t have to be silent either.

Today, I consider myself lucky. I am happily married. I have the support of my amazing brothers and sisters. I have a mother who found within herself a well of fortitude that saved us from the chaos a predator brought into our home.

But others are still scared, vulnerable, and struggling for the courage to tell the truth. The message that Hollywood sends matters for them.

What if it had been your child, Cate Blanchett? Louis CK? Alec Baldwin? What if it had been you, Emma Stone? Or you, Scarlett Johansson? You knew me when I was a little girl, Diane Keaton. Have you forgotten me?

Woody Allen is a living testament to the way our society fails the survivors of sexual assault and abuse.

So imagine your seven-year-old daughter being led into an attic by Woody Allen. Imagine she spends a lifetime stricken with nausea at the mention of his name. Imagine a world that celebrates her tormenter.

Are you imagining that? Now, what’s your favorite Woody Allen movie?

http://kristof.blogs.nytimes.com/?module=BlogMain&action=Click&region=Header&pgtype=Blogs&version=Blog Main&contentCollection=Opinion
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Feb, 2014 11:03 pm
@jespah,
Quote:
I just find the whole thing really strangely timely after a NY Times article on Ronan, who is going to host a show on MSNBC. His mother let it slip (sure, sure, keep claiming that) that he might be Sinatra's kid.

I don't doubt that Mia was trying to hype interest in her son by dropping that tidbit of gossip, to help boost his new show or book.

But, now that Ronan is becoming more publicly visible I wonder if she also wasn't responding to some buzz that he might be Sinatra's son--he does look like Sinatra, and, not at all like Woody Allen.
http://static01.nyt.com/images/2014/01/05/magazine/05farrow1/05farrow1-master495.jpg

Well, some mystique about his paternity, might get people to tune in to Ronan's new show, just to get a look at him.

It certainly is another a dig at Allen, since Ronan is ostensibly his only biological child, or so Mia led him to believe. But I'm also not going to judge Mia for whatever vindictiveness she may still harbor toward Allen.

What I find sad is how this family is choosing to air their difficulties in such a public manner, with the two competing NY Times articles by Dylan and Woody, and the comments in Vanity Fair, and by the recent remarks of Moses Farrow who recently said in People magazine he doesn't believe that his sister Dylan was ever sexually molested by Allen, causing Dylan to say, "My brother is dead to me".
http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20783306,00.html

There's a great deal of hurt and rancor that's still raw, on all sides, among these people, even after decades, but it's something that should be resolved privately, and not in the public square like this. I find it painful to watch people scratching at their emotional sores in this way, and I have no desire to take sides with any of it. It has been a complex saga.
http://nypost.com/2014/02/08/woody-mia-a-greek-tragedy/

I admire Woody Allen's work as a filmmaker and I see it as being quite apart from what he is personally like or how I feel about the accusations against him. I was appalled by his sexual relationship with Soon-Yi Previn, and his attitude about it, and by some of the things I heard during the custody hearings, but I was able to put these things aside when I watched his movies, and I've continued to do so for over 20 years. I don't admire him as a human being, but I do admire and appreciate most of his work.



JTT
 
  2  
Reply Mon 10 Feb, 2014 03:39 pm
@firefly,
You sure have an awfully big mouth for someone who doesn't want to take sides, ff. You've always been a nancy grace.
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Mon 10 Feb, 2014 04:53 pm
This vanity fair writer is interesting, she seems to skew tabloid even on a good day, and has a habit of doing slasher peices on people who are already broadly disliked. Still trying to find out if the oct piece was originally her idea, someone else at VF, or Mia's. ALL of her Farrow/Alan war "reporting" has been extremely anti Allen, which is a pretty good reason to discount all of her work. She also has a strong bias towards do gooders who work Africa, as Mia certainly does.
hawkeye10
 
  0  
Reply Mon 10 Feb, 2014 05:47 pm
@hawkeye10,
Why I Worked With Roman Polanski



I was sexually molested as an 8-year-old, I wrote a movie for Polanski, and I choose to believe Dylan Farrow.

By Rafael Yglesias

Quote:
My choosing between the likelihood of whether 28-year-old Dylan Farrow is a deeply disturbed victim of false memories implanted by a vengeful woman, or a victim of an entitled, narcissistic man who was unable to control his desire to seduce and bully a child has no real consequence. I choose to believe Dylan Farrow.

I do not, however, share Dylan’s extension of the responsibility for punishing Woody Allen to filmmakers. Actors, writers, and producers are not cops, judges, or jurors. In the work they choose to do, writers, actors, producers, and directors can be held accountable solely for its quality and its ideas.

When I first spoke to Roman Polanski about writing an adaptation for him of Death and the Maiden, I told him I would only write it if we could make two significant alterations. In the play, Paulina never says exactly what was done to her and she is never able to prove to her husband, the one person in the play who doesn’t know whether she is right, that she has correctly identified her rapist. I told Polanski that Paulina would want to tell her husband precisely what had happened to her and now would be the occasion for her to be detailed about her rape. “Of course,” Polanski said. “She should say what he did to her.” The second change I wanted to make was to write a final, truthful confession by the rapist, confirming that Paulina had correctly identified him. The play had been praised for its “ambiguity” in this regard. I told Polanski I thought that given the heroine’s final act, letting her rapist go, ambiguity made her mercy meaningless. Also, I said, it was a cheat. The rapist and the heroine know the truth—why are we deprived of it? “Of course,” Polanski said. “Not telling the audience whether or not he is guilty is bullshit.” Working with a rapist is not the same as condoning rape.

I do, however, wholeheartedly agree with Dylan Farrow that I should not honor a man’s so-called life achievement because I enjoy his movies. By his own account of himself, Woody Allen is not an example of an admirable life, including when it comes to the thematic content of his films. “The heart wants what it wants,” he is fond of stating. As all who have been raped, sexually assaulted, abused, and molested know, the heart’s desire is not always admirable.


http://www.slate.com/articles/life/culturebox/2014/02/dylan_farrow_woody_allen_and_roman_polanski_why_i_chose_to_work_with_polanski.2.html
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Feb, 2014 06:36 pm
Woody Allen entered Soon Yi's life as a father figure while he was having relations with Mia Farrow for 12 years. Soon Yi was 9 years old at that time,
12 years later he married her, transitioning from father figure to husband.
She was 21 years old when they got married, surely they had an affair prior to that for quite some time.

A sexual healthy male who has been a father figure to a 9 year old girl, will not start an affair with her a few years later. Do we know he molested Soon Yi beforehand? No we don't, but I would not put my hands in the fire for this one.

Did he molest Dylan? We don't know - only Woody Allen and Dylan know for sure, but I can guess based on his behavior. As a human being, I find Woody Allen despicable!!
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  0  
Reply Mon 10 Feb, 2014 07:16 pm
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
ALL of her Farrow/Alan war "reporting" has been extremely anti Allen, which is a pretty good reason to discount all of her work.

Maureen Orth's two Vanity Fair articles, done 20 years apart, have been profiles of Mia Farrow--they aren't intended as "reporting" on the Farrow/Allen war--they're designed to give the reader a better idea of what Mia, and her life, is like.

I found the October article quite interesting.
http://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2013/11/mia-farrow-frank-sinatra-ronan-farrow

It also helped to put the issue of Ronan's paternity, and why she hinted it might be Sinatra, in some perspective--she was responding to a direct question by Orth, based on something the gossip columnist, Liz Smith had hinted at because of Ronan's close relationship with Nancy Sinatra Jr. and Nancy Sinatra Sr. Her response that Sinatra "Possibly" is his father seemed more an honest admission than anything else. All things considered, it's likely Sinatra is his father.

But, aside from that tidbit of gossip, the information about Ronan's abilities, and his level of accomplishment, and how he and Mia have also joined forces to get action on their causes, I found much more interesting to learn about in terms of this young man. He sounds very impressive. That alone might get me to tune into his MSNBC show when it goes on the air.

I think it's Dylan who decided she wanted to speak out now, and revisit and reveal the effect Woody Allen has had on her life. She's obviously disturbed by his professional accolades, and she wants Hollywood to look at what this man did to her, and then re-consider his work in that light, and she'd like to see him shunned. She's entitled to express that opinion. And this does seem to be something that's emanating from Dylan and not Mia. The Vanity Fair article may have helped pave the way for her piece in the NY Times, but, beyond that, I don't see them as closely connected.

Woody Allen's relationship with Soon-Yi really devastated this family, so even apart from Dylan's story, I don't think you'll find many articles, about Mia or her children, that don't have an anti-Woody component. A number of very negative things about him, and his relationship with the children, emerged doing those custody hearings, and he did lose even supervised visits with Ronan because of physically abusive actions toward the child. Judging by his NY Times response to Dylan, he's still caught up in trying to make Mia the villain, and in trying to discredit Dylan, without much compassion, or respect, for what Dylan says she has been experiencing for the past 20 years. He really isn't a very admirable human being, and occasionally making some very good films, doesn't change that.

JTT
 
  3  
Reply Mon 10 Feb, 2014 07:20 pm
@firefly,
Now why don't you fill us in on your neighbours, ff?
0 Replies
 
 

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