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Shipping Puppy on Plane?

 
 
Miller
 
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 07:26 am
Has anyone had any experience with shipping a young puppy ( 8-12 weeks old ) by plane?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 6,074 • Replies: 16
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 08:11 am
Nope I haven't, but it sounds like a bad idea to me.
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 08:55 am
How long would the flight be?
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 09:00 am
I first read this as "Skipping puppy on plane" and the first thing that came to mind was "You would have to be very tall to do that." Personally, I think 8-12 weeks old is still a bit young to ship a puppy via air, unless it is a very short flight.
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 09:00 am
Even if it is a short flight, I still don't think it's a good idea.
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 09:15 am
Sometimes not-so-great ideas are the only solution. Remember, puppies sleep a lot. Also pedigreed pups are shipped from reputable breeders all over the U.S.

Airline baggage handlers are often animal lovers. I shopped a nearly-year-old Irish setter puppy from London's Heathrow Airport to Denver, Colorado.

Unfortunately, the union employees staged a work-to-rule and Sasha didn't take off on schedule. Twenty-four hours afterwards, when I went to pick her up, I found her playing with the baggage handlers and sharing their lunches.

Are there alternatives?
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 09:18 am
I flew with my dog a lot while living out of state from my family. But, we never flew at so young an age. I think that the flight will have a lasting affect on the dog's personality. What affect, exactly, it'll have is probably anyone's guess.

If it's the only option - it's the only option.
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Peace and Love
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 10:09 am
Miller, are you getting a puppy???

What breed is the puppy???

My daughter works for a professional dog handler, and they ship dogs and puppies on a fairly regular basis....

They won't ship in hot weather.... they will miss a dog show, rather than risk shipping in hot weather....

I know that some airlines are better.... unfortunately, I can't remember any names right off the top of my head....

Miller, where will the puppy be shipped from and to???

Also.... the rescue groups have a network of ground transporting, where individuals in different States provide a leg of the journey.... it's amazing.... they move rescue dogs all over the United States and Canada.... they're very well organized....

PaL
:-)
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 10:41 am
Noddy24 wrote:
Sometimes not-so-great ideas are the only solution. Remember, puppies sleep a lot. Also pedigreed pups are shipped from reputable breeders all over the U.S.

Airline baggage handlers are often animal lovers. I shopped a nearly-year-old Irish setter puppy from London's Heathrow Airport to Denver, Colorado.

Unfortunately, the union employees staged a work-to-rule and Sasha didn't take off on schedule. Twenty-four hours afterwards, when I went to pick her up, I found her playing with the baggage handlers and sharing their lunches.

Are there alternatives?


Some of the dog breeders ship their puppies via air. The cost is close to what the average passenger would pay. Some breeders don't ship their puppies by any method of transportation.

I would aim for the shortage distance during a time period when the weather wasn't too warm.

One breeder said the air alloted to the puppies was the same as that to the passengers.

One way to get around some worries is to fly to the breeder and then take the puppy back, with the cage under my passenger sit.

I worry about a young dog being locked up in cargo, if that's where they would go.
0 Replies
 
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 10:42 am
Transporting Your Pet by Airplane
VetMed.com
Transporting Your Pet by Airplane
Author Diana Delmar
Editor Kathleen Cavanagh, DVM

Some airlines allow pets in the cabin if they are very small and can fit into a carrier under the seat. This may be an acceptable way to transport your pet if he or she is easy-going and travels well. If the airline you will be using does not allow pets in the cabin or you have a medium- to large-sized dog, transportation by plane can be a bit of a risky business.

The care of animals on airplanes is regulated by the United States Department of Agriculture, and it is true that many pets travel safely by airplane. Others, however, have been lost, become ill, and some have even died. Regulations are currently being updated to reflect the needs of traveling pets.

Pets shipped on airplanes must be at least 8 weeks old and fully weaned. If they are not with you in the cabin, they are transported as checked baggage or cargo. If the plane gets stuck on the runway and it is very hot or cold outside, your pet is at risk of overheating or hypothermia (low body temperature), respectively. According to the Air Transport Association, there is no guarantee that your pet will travel on the flight you book if shipped as cargo.

Short-nosed dogs such as the pug, chow chow, Lhasa apso, Pekingese, shih tzu, Boston terrier, and boxer, as well as flat-faced cats such as the Persian or Himalayan, do not breathe as efficiently as pets with longer noses and should not routinely be flown on airplanes.

Generally, pets should not be sedated for air travel, say experts. The effects of sedation at high altitude may be unpredictable, and sedation can interfere with the pet's ability to balance, which could lead to injury. More research is needed on the effects of sedation on the body at high altitudes.

If you have questions about whether your pet should be flown, check with your veterinarian.

If you decide to fly your pet, the trip must be carefully planned and coordinated with the airline of your choice.

Making Air Travel Safe for Your Dog

Make sure the airline you plan to use will transport your pet when you book your flight. Ask about specifics such as the kind and size of the kennel your pet must have, which might vary with the type of aircraft, and where you should take your pet when you check in for your flight.

If your trip includes a connecting flight, you will likely need to claim your pet at the connecting stop and check your pet in for the next flight, the Air Transport Association says. The Association also recommends that you do the following:

Be sure that your pet is healthy for travel and that you have a health certificate from your veterinarian issued soon before the trip (ask the airline about the specific time frame for validity of the certificate)
Be sure you have a kennel that is comfortable for your pet, enables him to turn around and lie down, and meets regulations such as good ventilation, secured food and water bowls, and proper labeling that includes your name, address, and contact label. The kennel should be marked "Live Animals."

Book a direct, nonstop flight and avoid holiday and weekend travel
Avoid flights during very hot or cold weather
Do not fly short-nosed pets

For more information, check out the Air Transport Association's web page at www.air-transport.org/public/pets/ or the web page of the United States Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service at www.aphis.usda.gov/oa/pubs/petravel.html.
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 10:46 am
Peace and Love wrote:
Miller, are you getting a puppy???

What breed is the puppy???

My daughter works for a professional dog handler, and they ship dogs and puppies on a fairly regular basis....

They won't ship in hot weather.... they will miss a dog show, rather than risk shipping in hot weather....

I know that some airlines are better.... unfortunately, I can't remember any names right off the top of my head....

Miller, where will the puppy be shipped from and to???

Also.... the rescue groups have a network of ground transporting, where individuals in different States provide a leg of the journey.... it's amazing.... they move rescue dogs all over the United States and Canada.... they're very well organized....

PaL
:-)


I'm thinking of a poodle or a Boston Terrier. I still haven't made up my mind, which one and which breeder I'll use.

One breeder stated on her website, that she used Continental Airlines.
She seemed very pleased about it.

If there was a way to get the puppy without the airline, believe me I'd go that route.
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 10:48 am
Since the Boston Terrier has a short nose, it looks like air travel is out of the question.
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Miller
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 10:50 am
Might add, prices for transport of the puppy are in the area of $300, if the puppy goes as cargo.
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Camille
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 10:56 am
If the puppy will fit in a carrier that fits under the seat, it can travel with a passenger in the cabin for an extra fee. I paid $50 four years ago.

I don't suggest shipping a puppy any other way these days since planes can get diverted, baggage can get diverted, or the plane can sit on taxiways for hours because of all the terrorist threats. The puppy could wind up in some other city or die in the baggage compartment to heat/cold.
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Miller
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 11:00 am
Camille wrote:
If the puppy will fit in a carrier that fits under the seat, it can travel with a passenger in the cabin for an extra fee. I paid $50 four years ago.

I don't suggest shipping a puppy any other way these days since planes can get diverted, baggage can get diverted, or the plane can sit on taxiways for hours because of all the terrorist threats. The puppy could wind up in some other city or die in the baggage compartment to heat/cold.


I agree that this is the way to transport the puppy. Believe me, I can't imagine going to the airport with the dog and going through security with the puppy, these days.

But your way would be the most sensible and the cheapest.

By the time we get home, I'll be ready for an early grave. Cool
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 11:41 am
miller, my boxer has flown maybe 6 times with no breathing issues that I know of.

I think that some (maybe many) airlines have started disallowing pets in the cabin due to terrorism and pet allergies.
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Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2004 11:43 am
I remember reading after 9/11 when American air space was closed that a number of international flights were diverted to Gander Airport. Not only did the airline staff worry about traveling animals, so did the very generous and open hearted people of Gander.
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