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The Church That Went To America.....and other worldwide trivia.

 
 
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 03:55 am
........and other interesting but little known snippets from around the world.
Feel free to amaze us.....

I'll start.....

The Church That Went To America.

The early churches of New England and probably right across America are admired for the simple elegance of their design, but it is a little known fact that their design is based almost entirely on St Martin's in the Fields church in London.
The rather unusual name is due to the fact that it was surrounded by fields when it was built, but gradually became a proper urban city church as London grew and spread around it, thereby removing the agricultural element completely.
When it was completed in 1724, it shocked the citizens of London, as it was quite revolutionary to 18th Century eyes.
Until St Martin's was built, it was accepted practise to place the steeple at the east end, not the west end of the church, but architect James Gibbs turned the thing on its head and stuck it at the west end.
He also built an imposing portico above it, which made the whole thing look like a grand entrance to an ancient temple.
Critics and architects marvelled at the audaciousness of the new style church, and after much discussion and argument, the new design became very popular - so much so that several members of Gibbs's staff were enticed to America by offer of large sums of money.
With the design of St Martin's packed in their saddlebags, they moved west as the American settlers moved west, building identical or near identical copies of St Martin's as they went.

St Martin's in the Field (architectural model)...
https://www.architecture.com/Images/RIBATrust/RIBALibrary/Exhibitions/2007/ArchitectureGallery/BuildingsInContext/StMartinInTheField_530x597.jpg





Richmond, Virginia......
https://www.world-guides.com/images/richmond/richmond_churches.jpg
 
Lordyaswas
 
  3  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 04:17 am
Dogs Before Nazis.

The British are quite well known for their love of dogs.
One dog that enjoyed the tolerant affection of the British people belonged to Hitler's ambassador in the 1930's, Joachim Von Ribbentrop.

In 1938, Ribbentrop's dog Giro died, and as a gesture of goodwill, he was allowed to bury it in the gardens to the left of the Duke of York's momument, just off the Mall.
Despite the fact that Ribbentrop immediately became a hate figure at the outbreak of war, no one even dreamed of disturbing the grave of his dog.

The dog's little headstone can still be seen today.

https://www.cabbieblog.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/giros-tombstone.jpg
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 04:22 am
@Lordyaswas,
Conneticut......

https://www.historicbuildingsct.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/first-church-guilford.jpg
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 04:38 am
Arlington St. Church Boston
http://www.uua.org/images/places/uuaarchives/asset_upload_file245_209819.jpg
And a few years earlier... Arlington St. Church, Boston (Photo c. 1861)
http://www.uua.org/images/places/uuaarchives/asset_upload_file161_209818.jpg
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 05:45 am
This was the church I attended as a child.

Now called Center Church, it was the Congregational Church of Brattleboro, Vt in my youth.

http://farm1.staticflickr.com/154/357647259_ec69ff5766_z.jpg
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 06:05 am
The actual St Martin's in situ....

https://www.malcolmreading.co.uk/images/library/smitf_hero.jpg


0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 06:22 am
@JPB,
http://i43.tinypic.com/s266om.jpg
The church, St. Mark the Evangelist Catholic Church, one of my great-great-uncles built, in Colwich, Kansas. ("Father Bernard Schmiehausen supervised the construction, which was completed in 1906. Much of the material for the new church came from the Wichita watch factory, which was purchased in 1900 for $4,516.50. The parish must have longed for their homeland, because the blueprints came directly from Germany.")
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 08:13 am
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-90pSXQ_ySjY/UKJ93bJ2N4I/AAAAAAAAACY/1vkVZQGO7ac/s1600/Holy%252BTrinity04.jpg
Holy Trinity, Wilmington Delaware
Swedish Chuch buildt 1698-1699 by Swedes in New Sweden
Some place itsays oldest church in USA and some other place oldest church in Delaware Valley.
It is now an episcopal church
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rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 08:24 am
I never realized there were so many cool churches all over the place.
http://lh6.ggpht.com/_dlkAw43cLC0/SWYmOUtmP0I/AAAAAAAACoc/6zyX89DItdU/s800/20-Unusual-Churches-PII-saint-michel-dAiguilhe-chapel.jpg
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 08:26 am
The Richmond round church in Richmond, Vt.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/99/Round_church_richmond_vermont_20040808.jpg/250px-Round_church_richmond_vermont_20040808.jpg
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 08:44 am
@rosborne979,
I have to get up early in the morning to catch the midnight mass on top of this mountain.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 08:59 am
@saab,
Think how much closer to heaven you'll be when you get there.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 10:03 am
@roger,
Probably worth it - with that view

http://www.vanessak.com/Architecture/Churches-and-other-neat-stuff/i-5PswW3G/0/L/DSC_2226-Edit-L.jpg

In Charleston SC and I think it was next to St. Philips´s church I saw a gravestone for a Swede born in Schwedische Pommern. Swesish Pomerania.
I felt that the part of history came very close.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 10:07 am
@saab,
Mass is only on Thursdays there (at 18:30). But it's as easy to go up as e.g. at Mont St. Michel.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 10:13 am
@saab,
The Gustaf-Adolfskyrkan (Swedish church) in Hamburg ... situated in the Portuguese quarter.

http://i39.tinypic.com/2prv1qw.jpg
saab
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 11:36 am
@Walter Hinteler,
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/32/Tyska_kyrkan_stadsbild_2012.jpg/256px-Tyska_kyrkan_stadsbild_2012.jpg

German Chusch in Stockholm

The German guild of St. Gertrude was founded on the location for the present church in the 14th century. The headquarters of the guild was gradually rebuilt into a church starting in the 1580s.

In 1571, King John III authorized the German expatriates in the city to form a separate parish, including summoning priests from Germany, and it thus became the first German ecclesiastical parish outside Germany,
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 12:07 pm
@saab,
saab wrote:
I have to get up early in the morning to catch the midnight mass on top of this mountain.

I can't tell if you're joking. Do you mean that you actually go to that church?
saab
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 12:11 pm
@rosborne979,
No, I do not go to that church.
WhatI meant was that it would probably take me 12 hours to get there at least.
It looks very very high up.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 12:12 pm
@rosborne979,
It's only 85 metres (279 ft) high, on a volcanic 'rock'.
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Wed 17 Jul, 2013 02:02 pm
@saab,
saab wrote:
No, I do not go to that church.
WhatI meant was that it would probably take me 12 hours to get there at least.
It looks very very high up.

ah yes, I get it. I would probably need a chair-lift to attend it Smile
0 Replies
 
 

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