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We're from the government and we're here to help....

 
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jun, 2013 06:51 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Of course the opinion of the US is going to decrease now that most of those nations populations no longer having the fear of the former USSR running hundreds of thousands of main battle tanks across Europe to the English channel with only the US military standing in their way.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jun, 2013 07:05 am
@BillRM,
Thanks for that info.
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jun, 2013 07:23 am
@BillRM,
Do you seriously think that the Soviets could have run hundreds of thousands of main battle tanks across Europe to the English channel even with nothing standing in their way?
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jun, 2013 07:53 am
@spendius,
Quote:
Do you seriously think that the Soviets could have run hundreds of thousands of main battle tanks across Europe to the English channel even with nothing standing in their way?


Yes without question at least when Stalin was in charge and very likely under the later leaderships of the USSR.

See any good history book on the invasion of Poland or Hungary by the USSR.

If however they did not run the tanks over Europe they would have still turn the European nations into puppets states of theirs by using the threat of unleashing the tanks.
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jun, 2013 09:29 am
@BillRM,
You must have played with toy forts too much Bill.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jun, 2013 11:40 am
@spendius,
Quote:
You must have played with toy forts too much Bill.


Try telling that to the Hungarians when USSR tanks rolled over them as they cry for help from the west.

Or for that matter try telling the Russians themselves or the French or the Poles that massive invasions do not occur when there is a country on your borders run by a dictatorship of one kind or another with overwhelming military power.

Silly person who seems never to had read any history.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jun, 2013 12:30 pm
@spendius,
Footnote there is no real reason to just read history books on the subject of massive invasions or the secondary subject of the behaviors the former USSR as there are still ten of millions of people alive in Europe that you could likely find to talk to directly if you care to trouble to do so, that where there in the flesh when the tanks by the tens of thousands roll into their nations.

Do we have any middle age or older Hungarians on this website that would like to comment on how reluctant the USSR of the late 1950s happen to had been in rolling tanks over their borders?
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jun, 2013 01:40 pm
@BillRM,
Quote:
Silly person who seems never to had read any history.


I've read a damn sight more history than you ever have and from better sources.

There was never the slightest chance that the Soviets could have "run hundreds of thousands of main battle tanks across Europe to the English channel". Not an earthly. Yanks or no Yanks in the way.

Battle tanks look good on TV I know but they are beasts in actual fact. And they suck gas like a sludge gulper. Especially uphill and there are a lot of hills from Russia to the channel. What's your estimate of fuel consumption for the trip.

And they could have by-passed the American Zone anyway. Cut it off if things go to plan. Which they never do of course. Except in board games I mean.

If Stalin had ordered that, after ordering the tanks and associated equipment and supplies, the generals would have put him to sleep. They would probably have put him to sleep for ordering the tanks and associated equipment and supplies because Western intelligence would notice such an industrial re-orientation very early in the proceedings and that wouldn't be a thing Uncle Joe didn't know.

Do you feel that the USA needs talking up all the time which is what you were doing.

Whenever I am accused of being silly, Billy, I automatically think that my respondent has either lost the argument or has become confused.

Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 14 Jun, 2013 01:49 pm
@BillRM,
... and they certainly would tell, too, that Radio Free Europe with its Hungarian language program misled the Hungarian people that NATO or United States would intervene if citizens continued to resist.
roger
 
  2  
Reply Fri 14 Jun, 2013 02:46 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
That was a rotten trick, Walt. I continue to be embarassed.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jun, 2013 02:48 pm
@roger,
Me too.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jun, 2013 03:19 pm
@spendius,
Strange the USSR was able to move tens of thousands of tanks across Europe while fighting the German rear guard all the way to the middle of Europe and of course Germany was able to move their tanks to the channel waters from the middle of Europe.

But for some strange reason starting in the middle of Germany with a force that was not build under the handicap of fighting inside their own lands they could not do what the Germans did with far less force IE reach the channel waters with armor.

Then there is no reason to think that they would need to move their tanks from the middle of Russian to the channel under their own power!!!!!!!!

Their launching point would had been East Germany not mother Russia..
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  0  
Reply Fri 14 Jun, 2013 03:22 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
... and they certainly would tell, too, that Radio Free Europe with its Hungarian language program misled the Hungarian people that NATO or United States would intervene if citizens continued to resist.


True however having zero to do with the willingness of the USSR to cross nation borders with military force including tanks in the after WW2 period.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Jun, 2013 08:17 am
Microsoft is doing some serious backpedaling on the XBox One. The present it as a "sharing" thing, not as a privacy issue but they've changed the fact that you must be online to access the games which means that you can turn the camera off.

Quote:


Last week at E3, the excitement, creativity and future of our industry was on display for a global audience.

For us, the future comes in the form of Xbox One, a system designed to be the best place to play games this year and for many years to come. As is our heritage with Xbox, we designed a system that could take full advantage of advances in technology in order to deliver a breakthrough in game play and entertainment. We imagined a new set of benefits such as easier roaming, family sharing, and new ways to try and buy games. We believe in the benefits of a connected, digital future.

Since unveiling our plans for Xbox One, my team and I have heard directly from many of you, read your comments and listened to your feedback. I would like to take the opportunity today to thank you for your assistance in helping us to reshape the future of Xbox One.

You told us how much you loved the flexibility you have today with games delivered on disc. The ability to lend, share, and resell these games at your discretion is of incredible importance to you. Also important to you is the freedom to play offline, for any length of time, anywhere in the world.

So, today I am announcing the following changes to Xbox One and how you can play, share, lend, and resell your games exactly as you do today on Xbox 360. Here is what that means:

An internet connection will not be required to play offline Xbox One games – After a one-time system set-up with a new Xbox One, you can play any disc based game without ever connecting online again. There is no 24 hour connection requirement and you can take your Xbox One anywhere you want and play your games, just like on Xbox 360.

Trade-in, lend, resell, gift, and rent disc based games just like you do today – There will be no limitations to using and sharing games, it will work just as it does today on Xbox 360.

In addition to buying a disc from a retailer, you can also download games from Xbox Live on day of release. If you choose to download your games, you will be able to play them offline just like you do today. Xbox One games will be playable on any Xbox One console — there will be no regional restrictions.

These changes will impact some of the scenarios we previously announced for Xbox One. The sharing of games will work as it does today, you will simply share the disc. Downloaded titles cannot be shared or resold. Also, similar to today, playing disc based games will require that the disc be in the tray.

We appreciate your passion, support and willingness to challenge the assumptions of digital licensing and connectivity. While we believe that the majority of people will play games online and access the cloud for both games and entertainment, we will give consumers the choice of both physical and digital content. We have listened and we have heard loud and clear from your feedback that you want the best of both worlds.

Thank you again for your candid feedback. Our team remains committed to listening, taking feedback and delivering a great product for you later this year.





DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Jun, 2013 08:40 am
@boomerang,
After the original specs came out, folks online were calling it the Xbone.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Mon 24 Jun, 2013 09:06 am
I came across this article this morning that I think really illustrates the danger of some school interventions:

Quote:
By the time Scott Kaufman was 3 years old, he’d had 21 ear infections and was diagnosed with an auditory processing disorder that made it nearly impossible for him to understand words in real time. The hearing lag, he explains, “made me appear really slow in any classroom type environment.”

At 9, when he was given an IQ test, he had trouble catching what the test administrator was saying. As a result, Kaufman was held back in the third grade and relegated, for the rest of elementary school, to special education, or the “resource room” as he calls it, in his new book, Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined, which examines the severe limitations of the conventional metrics we use to measure student intelligence— like the IQ test and the SAT.

Kaufman warns parents and educators about the dangers of labeling kids early on as either “ungifted” or “gifted and talented”— and creating a self-fulfilling prophecy for students that can follow them into adulthood. He says the latter group can feel enormous fear about losing the label, and avoid seeking new skills and react unhealthily to minor setbacks.

Luckily for Kaufman, everything changed one day in the ninth grade. A young teacher, Joyce Juell, who was substitute teaching in special education, took him aside and asked why he was still in the “resource room”.

“It was pretty amazing,” recalls Kaufman, “and everything just accelerated rapidly from there. Because this one teacher saw beyond the label of a ‘special ed kid,’ she empowered me to question the experts’ opinion of my intelligence.”

Today, at 34, Kaufman is a psychology professor at New York University, with a Ph.D. in cognitive science from Yale and a blog “Beautiful Minds” on Scientific America. After that fateful encounter with Juell freshman year, he says, he went on to earn straight A’s in regular high school classes, where he’d been getting C’s and D’s in his special education ones.

But why wouldn’t Kaufman have performed better in his special education classes if, clearly, he was so capable of it?

The answer may lie in something called the “expectancy effect.” According to Kaufman, educational research shows that pigeonholing students can actually create outcomes, so that children placed in special education or called “ungifted” can become much less motivated than their peers—because they internalize the label and eventually believe that they aren’t intelligent. He illustrates in his book how studies have also shown that teachers treat students differently based on their “status,” are more respectful of “regular” kids than the “ungifted,” and have higher expectations for “talented” children, creating a kind of intelligence feedback loop.

Jessica Lahey, an English and Latin middle school teacher in Lyme, N.H., who writes about education for the New York Times, says that she believes even one positive interaction— like the one Kaufman had with Juell— can reorient a student’s frame of mind.

She recounts the story of a boy who was “really disruptive” and “drove her nuts” in the classroom. He really was on the verge of failing, Lahey says, and she realized she had to try something different— and come up with a way to have at least one positive interaction with the “problem student.”

Instead of chastising him for his poor behavior and lackluster academic performance, she came up with one seemingly small compliment— a deliberate step to change their dynamic— and six months later, his grade and attitude were completely different.

Students pushed into less competitive tracks or special education, aren’t potentially only held back by their own sense of identity and their teachers’ expectations, it can also affect how they do on the SAT, experts say.

“The SAT is absolutely not an intelligence test. It’s entirely based on coursework,” says Leslie Sepuka, a spokesperson for The College Board, the non-profit organization that administers the SAT.

The best way to prepare for the SAT, she explains is to take challenging courses in high school. According to Sepuka, SAT takers in the class of 2012 who reported taking The College Board’s “core curriculum” scored 144 points higher, on average, than those who did not.

Because of some students like Kaufman's more limited coursework, they’re already taking the SAT with one hand tied behind their back too, likely garnering them lower scores, and college rejections— all reinforcing the label they may have acquired a decade earlier.


http://www.today.com/moms/former-special-ed-students-book-shows-why-its-wrong-label-6C10415044
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Jun, 2013 09:12 am
@boomerang,
Right on, Scott Kaufman.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Mon 24 Jun, 2013 09:12 am
We had a very similar experience with Mo in elementary school.

He had his "hero" teacher this year, his science/math teacher, who sat him down one day and said "You're smarter than what you're showing me." When he tried to make excuses saying "At my last school blahblahblah..." she said "You're not at that school anymore. Show me what you can do."

And he did.

I sent her a note thanking her for giving him that push. It was really all he needed. He finished up the year making really good marks -- even earning an A on his end of year paper. Before he would never write anything without huge interventions and hand holding. He hated writing and was convinced he couldn't do it.

The labels he got in elementary school nearly buried him.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Jun, 2013 10:38 am
@boomerang,
So glad to read that. Big yayyy.
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Jun, 2013 11:22 am
@ossobuco,
This is one of those occasions when my amiable nature drives me into taking up where I left off in Charlotte Haldane's little book Marcel Proust.
0 Replies
 
 

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