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Scientists May Have Uncovered Ancient Microcontinent

 
 
Reply Mon 25 Feb, 2013 02:28 pm
Scientists May Have Uncovered Ancient Microcontinent
by Scott Neuman
February 25, 2013 1:51 PM

Rodinia. Mauritia is shoehorned between India and Madagascar.
United States Antarctic Program/Wikipedia Commons

The remains of a small continent have been hiding right under our noses for the past 85 million years or so.

That's according to a new study published Sunday in the journal Nature Geoscience. Scientists looked at lava sands from beaches on Mauritius to determine when and where the material might have originated.

Their conclusion? The lava sands, containing particles called zircon xenocrysts, came from a Precambrian microcontinent dubbed "Mauritia" that was sandwiched between the land masses that today make up Madagascar and India. It was all part of a supercontinent known as Rodinia that existed between 2 billion and 85 million years ago. (Not to be confused with the better known and slightly more contemporary supercontinent Pangaea).

Mauritia was a sliver of land that broke apart and disappeared under the sea as the Rodinia ripped itself apart as part of the process of plate tectonics, scientists believe.

The BBC quotes the study's lead author, Trond Torsvik, as saying the sand his team examined dates to a 9-million-year-old eruption near the modern-day islands of Marion and Reunion that spewed much older material.

"We found zircons that we extracted from the beach sands, and these are something you typically find in a continental crust. They are very old in age," said Torsvik of the University of Oslo in Norway.

Torsvik believes pieces of Mauritia have been interred under 6 miles of surface and spread over a swath of the Indian Ocean, according to the BBC.

"However, a small part could have survived.

" 'At the moment the Seychelles is a piece of granite, or continental crust, which is sitting practically in the middle of the Indian Ocean,' explained Prof Torsvik.

" 'But once upon a time, it was sitting north of Madagascar. And what we are saying is that maybe this was much bigger, and there are many of these continental fragments that are spread around in the ocean.'
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Type: Question • Score: 7 • Views: 1,292 • Replies: 8
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farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Feb, 2013 03:59 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
If the mods are gonna tag these damn threads, they should at least get it right. THIS HAS absolutely nothing to do with ARCHAEOLOGY.
I like to keep my tags strait so I re-tagged it.My work is done.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Feb, 2013 04:00 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
to geologists this was news in 1993
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Feb, 2013 04:09 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

to geologists this was news in 1993


Heh

Cycloptichorn
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Feb, 2013 04:09 pm
@farmerman,
Maybe I should retag it as "Atlantis"?
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Feb, 2013 04:32 pm
@farmerman,
At least they didn't tag it 'scientology.'
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Feb, 2013 05:20 pm
@roger,
no to the rat
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Feb, 2013 05:21 pm
@edgarblythe,
hmmm
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Feb, 2013 05:22 pm
@farmerman,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rodinia
As we can see, this is old stuff.
0 Replies
 
 

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