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Anyone hereabout a speedreader

 
 
Reply Mon 21 Jan, 2013 12:17 pm
Especially concerned with its execution, after casual investigation I note how easy to misinterpret by the skip of a single word

The speedreader typically proceeds in a descending twirling fashion but wondering what technique might prevent this occasional lapse
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  4  
Reply Mon 21 Jan, 2013 02:47 pm
@dalehileman,
I detest the very idea of speed-reading. I'm a relatively slow reader because I savor every word. Somebody bothered to write it, I should at least have the courtesy to read all of it. How much time do I want to save?
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Mon 21 Jan, 2013 03:05 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Yes Andy I understand but one needs just a glance at what's happening in the world, and the day is after all just so long
Lustig Andrei
 
  3  
Reply Mon 21 Jan, 2013 03:17 pm
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:
the day is after all just so long


True, but I have no intention of trying to read all of, say, Ulysses in one day.
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Mon 21 Jan, 2013 03:19 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
I was thinking more in terms of the Victorville, Ca Daily Press
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
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Reply Mon 21 Jan, 2013 03:20 pm
i heard about a speed dealer

got 40 years
Lustig Andrei
 
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Reply Mon 21 Jan, 2013 03:23 pm
@djjd62,
Yeah, the cops set up those speed traps . . .
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georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jan, 2013 04:01 pm
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:

Especially concerned with its execution, after casual investigation I note how easy to misinterpret by the skip of a single word

The speedreader typically proceeds in a descending twirling fashion but wondering what technique might prevent this occasional lapse


I took a speedreading course a long time ago. We then used machines with an automatic cover that descended over each page at a fixed rate - a device to help the students developed the scanning technique. To my surprise, we all found that with concentration we could nearly double our normal reading speed without any measurable loss of comprehension - as measured in tests of short-term recollection. Whether this translates to long-term retention of complex ideas that may be in the test is another question.

We also found that without conscious effort and practice, we reverted back to our normal speeds, though some claimed to have experienced a steady improvement imn reading speed.
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Mon 21 Jan, 2013 06:14 pm
@georgeob1,
Thanks Geo but by chance did you encounter the phenom I query
georgeob1
 
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Reply Mon 21 Jan, 2013 10:01 pm
@dalehileman,
No: at least I am not familiar with the term.

I do remember well the book I used in the course. It was an historical novel, called "A Crossbowman's Story" : a fictiona account of the real journey of a Spoanish soldier, Francisco Orellana across the Andes in Peru in an early expedition led by Ferdinand Pizzaro's brother Gonsalves, and a subsequent journey down from the headwaters of the Amazon to the Atlantic after Orellana and a group of about 15 other soldiers became separated from the main force after a battle. When, after a couple of months on the river they got to the mouth of the Amazon and realized they were in salt water, they went ashore; built a larger boat with sails, and navigated up around the coast to the SApanish settlement in Trinidad. Tough guys !

The story has stayed with me for many years. Perhaps it was all the concentration, trying to stay ahead of ther screen.
dalehileman
 
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Reply Tue 22 Jan, 2013 11:57 am
@georgeob1,
Quote:
No: at least I am not familiar with the term.
Forgive, Geo, the phenomenon as misunderstanding a phrase by overleap of, say, a single word, and my query to find a technique that might overcome such a tendency, that is without significantly slowing

Quote:
I do remember…. "A Crossbowman's Story" : a fictiona account…….When, after a couple of months on the river…...built a larger boat……. Tough guys !…….trying to stay ahead of the screen.
Evidently you were eminently successful so I presume you didn't experience the difficulty
georgeob1
 
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Reply Tue 22 Jan, 2013 01:22 pm
@dalehileman,
In the course we were encouraged to try to read and grasp whole phrases, sentences, and paragraphs, instead of focusing on each individual word. Indeed as the speed was ramped up it became necessary just to keep up. At the high end of this as one's proficiency grtew, it was possible to miss the whole point by something like what you suggested.
dalehileman
 
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Reply Tue 22 Jan, 2013 01:37 pm
@georgeob1,
Quote:
to miss the whole point by something like what you suggested.
Yea Geo, the very prob

I gather we don't harbor many other speedreaders
0 Replies
 
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Jan, 2013 03:19 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Lustig Andrei wrote:
I detest the very idea of speed-reading. I'm a relatively slow reader because I savor every word. Somebody bothered to write it, I should at least have the courtesy to read all of it. How much time do I want to save?

You're a relatively young man, MA ... Dale doesn't have as much time as you do.
dalehileman
 
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Reply Tue 22 Jan, 2013 06:36 pm
@Ticomaya,
Quote:
Dale doesn't have as much time as you do.
Thanks Tico but being old, retired, I probably waste much more time than Andy
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Wed 23 Jan, 2013 10:12 am
I took a speed-reading course about 40 years ago. You run your finger down the centre of the page and follow it with your eyes. It's surprising how much our peripheral vision can absorb.

I wouldn't read a novel that way, but it was extremely useful in university when reading material for essay topics; you got the gist of the material and if what you read was pertinent, you'd go back and read it more thoroughly.
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Wed 23 Jan, 2013 03:33 pm
@Mame,
Quote:
It's surprising how much our peripheral vision can absorb.
One of the many aspects of technique, Mame. Employing the technique you describe, given the typical newspaper column I find I can't take in an entire line with each jump unless alternate between slightly left of center and slightly right, I suppose one might call jogging

The expert, as I mentioned, scans in a kind of descending circumgyration (for immediate want of a better term). As long as we're slightly OT however, how about other techniques. Some concentrate on the noun though I've always thought the verb more enlightening
0 Replies
 
 

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