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"Farewell to Arms" passage

 
 
Reply Sun 20 Oct, 2013 11:25 am
I'm hardly literate reading Hemingway's Farewell to Arms. My first reaction, Why so hard to determine this guy's name

http://www.shmoop.com/farewell-to-arms/summary.html

But specifically in Book 2, Chapter XXIV notwithstanding Henry's goodbye to Catherine, upon entering his train car where the machine-gunner apparently had apparently been saving him a set then usurped by a captain of artillery

What's belletristic technique of this sort called, and in this instance what sort of allegory if any

Thanks fellas

No, not a homework assignment, just "intellectual" curiosity in literary rubrics


Yea, S., again forgive me, couldn't resist
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timur
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Oct, 2013 12:15 pm
Dale wrote:
I'm hardly literate reading Hemingway's Farewell to Arms.

Indeed and belles-lettres you don't do:
Dale wrote:
the machine-gunner apparently had apparently


Dale wrote:
been saving him a set

It was a seat, Dale.


Quote:
then usurped by a captain of artillery

Had you read the book, you would know that it was not usurped, the captain had the right to claim the seat.
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 20 Oct, 2013 12:38 pm
@timur,
Dale wrote:
been saving him a set

Quote:
It was a seat, Dale.
Alas Tim I would have caught that eventually tho a2k doesn't allow much time for edit. My apologies to all for such grotesque raillery

Quote:
then usurped by a captain of artillery

Quote:
Had you read the book, you would know that it was not usurped, the captain had the right to claim the seat.
Thank you for that report, Tim. Actually I had read the book but being forgetful, I'm in the process of rereading

Since I read only during the commercials I keep a second bookmarks going halfway thru the remainder of the tome and even so disremember such detail

The Captain's authorization aside, however, I'm wondering about deeper meanings, belletristic technique, allegory, etc

But thanks for your interest Tim
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Oct, 2013 01:21 pm
@dalehileman,
In fact I was gratified at getting any response at all. My interest arises not from my love of Hemingway out of a sense of guilt in not having pursued the classics, among other possible uplifting pursuits while at my advanced age I often don't comprehend the subtleties, taking most input literally at face value and that's why I inquire about the significance of the train seating incident. Note Tim I spelled it right this time
timur
 
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Reply Mon 21 Oct, 2013 01:27 pm
@dalehileman,
Dale wrote:
Note Tim I spelled it right this time


Yeah.

The old man and the seat..
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Oct, 2013 01:31 pm
@timur,
Being Recording Secretary of the Greater Southwest Beer-Tasting Society

I only fly by the sea of my pints
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timur
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Oct, 2013 01:38 pm
@dalehileman,
If nobody comes to your help, I'll get back to you, one of these days..
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Oct, 2013 04:06 pm
@timur,
Be wading with baited berth
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Mon 21 Oct, 2013 05:31 pm
@dalehileman,
It's been probably somewhere in the vicinity of 50 years (no exaggeration) since the most recent time I actually perused any part of Farewell to Arms. Loved it at the time. But as I seem to recall its major appeal lay in Hemingway's style, his vocabulary and method of telling an essentially simple story. The plot is actually minimal and I don't recall anything that I would have identified as allegorical at the time. Since I was young then, I might well have been wrong on that score. But I still recall the style,particularly the poetry of that opening paragraph, more than anything else about the book.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Oct, 2013 09:43 am
@Lustig Andrei,
Delighted to learn there are 3 of us anyhow

Quote:
But I still recall the style,
Yea Andy indeed that's his forte, and any subtle humor one might have missed in his youth

..or even his old age (me)


Alas, speaking of age, didn't the poor fellow eventually commit suicide
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Oct, 2013 03:37 pm
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:
Alas, speaking of age, didn't the poor fellow eventually commit suicide


Oh yes. He knew when his time was up. His widow Mary kept insisting that it had somehow been an accident while he was cleaning a shotgun. Why would one stick the barrel of a loaded shotgun in one's mouth,take off his socks and pull the trigger with his big toe while cleaning the piece? Unlikely, if you ask me. Time magazine, as I recall, devoted an entire issue to the obituary with tributes from every author and sycophant still living. But, as Yogi Berra used to say, you can look it up.
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