6
   

Best Mystery and Suspense Novels

 
 
Reply Sat 12 Jan, 2013 04:06 am
Which books do you suggest in mystery and suspense? I need the best ones you have read
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Jan, 2013 06:45 am
@discountkart,
I liked Gillian Flynn's novels, especially "Gone Girl"
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Jan, 2013 01:52 pm
I'm a fan of Ngaio Marsh. Also, I enjoyed reading the old Sherlock Holmes mysteries.
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Jan, 2013 02:02 pm
@discountkart,
Some of my favorite authors in this genre include Sue Grafton, Raymond Chandler. Robert Parker, Scott Turow, Dashiel Hammet, Ngaio Marsh, others. Chandler, Hammet and Marsh, of course, are classics, nearly as venerated as A. Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes. The others are more modern. For police procedurals Joseph Wambaugh, ex-LA cop, can't be beat. There are a number of others that, for some reason, don't come to mind immediately.
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Jan, 2013 02:05 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
I agree with Andy about Wambaugh and police procedurals. I would add Wahloo and Sjowall to that genre.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Jan, 2013 02:08 pm
@Roberta,
Yep, wasn't thinking of the Swedes.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Jan, 2013 02:17 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
A good writer relatively new to english translations is the Norwegian writer, Jo Nesbo. He's also a musician and an economist.

Suspense? John Le Carre.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  2  
Reply Sat 12 Jan, 2013 03:51 pm
I have a recently acquired liking for T. Jefferson Parker's novels. Sadly, in the one I am nearly finished with right now, he has a police detective who carries a couple of spare cylinders for his Colt Python. C'mon Parker, if you're going to write about guns, learn something about guns.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Jan, 2013 04:40 pm
@roger,
Yeah, I'm with you on that, roger. Irritates the bejazus out of me to have writers confidently describing something they're obviously unfamiliar with.

Just discovered a new detective story writer from South Africa -- Deon [sp.?] Meyer. Apparently he writes in Africaans because the book I read (Thirteen Hours) is a translation. The fascinating part for me is that he writes about present-day post-Apartheid South Africa and the interactions between black, white and "colored" characters is fascinating. He obviously knows what he's talking about. To add spice to the stories (for me, at least) his series character, a South African Police Inspector, is a recovering alcoholic who doesn't drink any more and attends A.A. meetings!
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Jan, 2013 05:06 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Jo Nesbo's protagonist is also an alcoholic in a stop mode (in the latest I've read). Nesbo has an excellent translator, Don Bartlett, who appears to be as spare and wellwording as Nesbo... or at least pay great attention to Nesbo's taut prose.
Hard to tell, since I speak no norwegian.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Jan, 2013 05:14 pm
@ossobuco,
Meantime, I'm not clear on the interests of discountkart with a2k, but I've trouble resisting a book thread.

The poster can write a book title in the search window (upper right, dark blue band) and see what any of us has said about any book.
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Jan, 2013 06:38 pm
Is it time yet to say, "Agatha Christie"?
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Jan, 2013 06:45 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Say away, Andy.

I'm back to suggest some Poe short stories. The mysteries weren't great, but the suspense stories were good. Try the Telltale Heart.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Jan, 2013 07:03 pm
@Roberta,
IMO, Roberta, out of the 100-plus books that Aunt Agatha wrote, there are only maybe a half dozen at most that I'd recommend as pretty timeless. She was good at flouting the conventions of murder mystery writing at the time and some of her best stuff is good because it goes against the grain of what a solution to a murder should be. The Murder of Roger Achroyd, Muder on the Orient Express, And Then There Were None (also published as Ten Little Indians) and Three Blind Mice (The Moustrap in the stage version) all fall into this category of totally unexpected solutions.
wandeljw
 
  3  
Reply Sun 13 Jan, 2013 09:30 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Lustig Andrei wrote:

IMO, Roberta, out of the 100-plus books that Aunt Agatha wrote, there are only maybe a half dozen at most that I'd recommend as pretty timeless. She was good at flouting the conventions of murder mystery writing at the time and some of her best stuff is good because it goes against the grain of what a solution to a murder should be. The Murder of Roger Achroyd, Muder on the Orient Express, And Then There Were None (also published as Ten Little Indians) and Three Blind Mice (The Moustrap in the stage version) all fall into this category of totally unexpected solutions.


The ones that go against the grain are truly classics, especially And Then There Were None. Josephine Tey, who was a contemporary of Christie, wrote mainly for the theater. Tey wrote only a small number of mystery novels, but all are classics and went against the grain. The Daughter of Time is especially good.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Jan, 2013 01:59 pm
@wandeljw,
The Daughter of Time is probably the most satisfying mystery I have ever read. (Never mind that it has some historical inaccuracies. Smile)
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » Best Mystery and Suspense Novels
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.24 seconds on 11/30/2020 at 08:05:01