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How do you make sizzling rice?

 
 
jespah
 
Reply Fri 13 Dec, 2002 09:10 am
I suspect this is fairly obvious, but I'd like some guidance in the matter. I'm interested in making Chinese shrimp sizzling rice soup. I know how to make the soup part so that's no problem. What I want to be able to do is the 'special effect' of the sizzling rice.

I figure you cook the rice and then you fry it? Sort of? But the rice in the soup at our favorite restaurant doesn't come out greasy or sticky, so I am sure I'm missing a step here. Help!

Thank you.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 2 • Views: 16,808 • Replies: 19
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Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Dec, 2002 09:14 am
I thought the rice was "fried" in a dry pan... but I don't know. Would be interested.
0 Replies
 
JerryR
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Dec, 2002 09:41 am
Hi Jespah,

I've never made this, but in searching it out,..this seems to be the most common type of recipe:

Sizzling Rice Hot & Sour Soup

4 Dried black mushrooms
5 cup Chicken broth
1 Chicken breast half, skinned, boned, and cut into matchstick pieces
1/4 cup Slivered bamboo shoots
1/2 cup Rice vinegar
2 Tbsp Soy sauce
1 Green onion (including top), cut into 2 inch slivers
1 tsp Finely chopped cilantro (Chinese parsley)
1 tsp Hot pepper sauce
1/2 tsp Salt
1/2 tsp White pepper
3 Tbsp Cornstarch mixed with 1/4 cup water
1 Egg, lightly beaten Vegetable oil for deep-frying
8 Two-inch square rice crusts

Soak mushrooms in warm water to cover for 30 minutes; drain. Cut off
and discard stems and thinly slice caps. Set aside.
Bring broth to a boil over medium-high heat in a large pot. Add
chicken and cook, stirring occasionally, for 3 minutes. Stir in
mushrooms, bamboo shoots, vinegar, soy sauce, green onion, cilantro,
hot pepper sauce, salt, and white pepper. Return to a boil. Add
cornstarch solution and cook, stirring, until soup thickens slightly.
Remove pot from heat and slowly drizzle in egg, stirring constantly.
Keep warm while preparing rice crusts.
Set wok in a ring stand and add oil to a depth of about 2 inches. Over
high heat, bring oil to 375. Add rice crusts, half at a time, and
cook, turning constantly, for 15 seconds or until puffed. Lift out
and drain on paper towels. Cook remaining crusts. Pout hot soup into
a warmed serving bowl and carry to the table. Bring hot fried rice
crusts to the table and carefully slide into the soup.

To Make Rice Crusts: Combine 1 cup medium- or short-grained rice and 1 cup
water in a medium saucepan. Cover and bring to a boil over high heat.
Reduce heat to low and simmer for 25 minutes. Turn off heat and let
stand for 5 minutes. Spread cooked rice in a 1/4" thick layer on a
greased, shallow baking pan. Cut into 1 1/2-2" squares with a wet
knife. Bake in a 350 oven for 50 minutes or until rice squares are
firm and dry. Store rice crusts in an airtight container at room
temperature for up to 6 months.

Serves 4-6
0 Replies
 
JerryR
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Dec, 2002 09:52 am
Oh, and the keys to frying without making your food "greasy" are:

Cook with fresh, clean oil (meaning, you can re-use frying oil many times,..but once it absorbs food flavors or smells, or is overheated you must discard it)

Fry at the right temperature, usually around 300 - 350 degrees.

Fry in smaller batches,..as you add cold food to hot oil,..the temperature of the oil will drop,..the more cold food you add, the lower the temp of the oil will drop,.....too much can result in soggy, oily food,..as well as lowering the temp at which the oil will burn.

Don't over cook,..the bubbles you see coming out of your food while it is frying, are the moisture in the food, turning to steam and escaping,..as long as "bubbles" are coming out,..the oil can't get in, so it is best to get your food out of the frying medium, before the bubbling slows too much.
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Dec, 2002 10:04 am
Jerry, you rock! Thank you thank you thank you!!! :-D
0 Replies
 
Vincent
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Dec, 2002 02:34 pm
Jerry pretty much has it covered. Making sizzling rice soup in incidentally the best way to use up the crust that forms when you steam rice in a pot or a rice cooker (so long as it hasn't burned). Eat the fluffy steamed rice, then carefully remove the crust that has formed in the bottom of the pan. Dry completely (on a tray in a warm, switched off oven for example, or just on the kitchen counter overnight).

You can fry them as Jerry suggests, but if you have the oven going anyway, you can also bake them until golden, turning from time to time to prevent them from burning. Have the soup ready to serve, rush the crispy rice to the table in its baking dish to keep it as hot as possible, and impress your guests with the crackling and steam as you add the rice to the soup with flourish (but not so much flourish that you splatter yourself or any dining companions).
0 Replies
 
JerryR
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Dec, 2002 03:48 pm
Hi Vincent!!

Welcome aboard!!! Very Happy

It's good to see you!
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Dec, 2002 09:49 pm
It's just for the two of us, but hey, if you can't make your own homemade meals festive ...? Know what I mean?

Went to the store today and bought a lotta rice. Tomorrow, I'll cook up a bunch of the squares and put 'em away. Will let you know how it works out. I like the idea of baking them as I'll have the oven running tomorrow anyway.

Many, many thanks, gentlemen!
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Dec, 2002 10:17 pm
Hi Vincent!
0 Replies
 
Vincent
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Dec, 2002 08:06 pm
Hi, Jerry. Hi, Piffka.

I have some carcasses leftover from tonight's dinner. Maybe I'll make some stock then whip up some hot and sour soup!
0 Replies
 
JerryR
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Dec, 2002 12:52 am
Hi Vincent!

Would you do me a favor, could you please invite chun-chun over here?,...
I miss her!
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Dec, 2002 01:31 am
Vincent, it's great to see you finallly got on the boards. Yes, please do invite chun chun. I don't recall if I had a bad address or what, but she was on my invitation list and we would love to have her.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Dec, 2002 04:29 am
Vincent!
Great to see you here! Very Happy
0 Replies
 
mikey
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Dec, 2002 07:07 am
I asked the owner of the chinese food/pub here last night.
she said she measures the water and rice before boiling with her fingers......
boils for a spell, drains it, then mixes the stuff in and fries it in oil etc.

i'd stick with Jerry on this one tho.
0 Replies
 
Vincent
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Dec, 2002 04:38 pm
Mikey,

The Chinese measuring trick: Wash long grain rice, and when the water runs clean, place your index finger in the surface of the rice, but don't push it in. Fill with fresh water to the first knuckle. Bring to a boil uncovered, then clamp the lid on, reduce heat as far as it will go and leave for 20 minutes. Do not open lid and do not stir. The rice should be fluffy/slightly sticky and if you've done it right, a crust will have formed at the bottom of the pot, but not burned. This is what you want to dry and fry or bake for sizzling rice soup.
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Dec, 2002 04:52 pm
Well, I made the rice but we won't try it until Wednesday. So far, so good! :-D
0 Replies
 
Vincent
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Dec, 2002 05:10 pm
And for those of you looking for old Abuzz friends, I have just sent e-mails to Chun and to Kitchenpete, so we'll see if they show up here at some point.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Dec, 2002 05:20 pm
Thanks, Vincent.
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Dec, 2002 11:52 am
Thank you very much, Vincent! :-D
0 Replies
 
coolchef
 
  1  
Reply Thu 1 Apr, 2010 10:35 am
Mmmm never had sizzling rice before. Sounds delicious. I'll have to give it a try. Thanks Jerry for the recipe and the tips!
0 Replies
 
 

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