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Uniforms in the hospital

 
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Sep, 2012 07:12 pm
@chai2,
There is no need to argue here, I am just stating my opinion. I understand the OP. As an employee it would bother me. As a patient I don't care.

I think the OP (or any employee) has a right to not like a policy, and a right to ask for more money to compensate for having to do something she doesn't like.

Of course, this may mean seeking other employment where there is a policy she likes better or pay that is compensation enough. But it doesn't hurt to express your opinion with your current employer to see if they might work things out.

For what it is worth (and of course this is only my own feeling) it would take a lot of money to get me to wear color coded uniforms at work. But then again I have chosen a profession where that would be considered counterproductive.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Sep, 2012 07:21 pm
@maxdancona,
We understand that, re your profession.

As a patient in a lot of trouble, do you really want a lot of lookalikes wafting about in your room?

I'm sort of out of this, as RNs were easily discerned when I was around hospitals.

And so were tray girls, the name back then.
I figure it is up to the facility to make the difference clear.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Sep, 2012 07:36 pm
@ossobuco,
Quote:
do you really want a lot of lookalikes wafting about in your room?


You mean clones Smile? None of us wear a color-coded uniform at my work. I wouldn't call us lookalikes.

I can only speak from personal experience. I keep saying that it doesn't matter to me. I don't understand why you insist on arguing the point about what is important to me since I have accepted that it may be important to other people.

But no. Having people color coded is not important to me at all.

A few years back my son was airlifted into Boston Children's hospital for a sports injury. My wife and I were in the Emergency room in a pretty hectic place. People were running all over them place frantically doing very important things.

There were people in white gowns over random street clothes and people in scrubs. I am pretty sure they weren't color coded, and if they were it didn't matter to me. There was a social worker who stayed with my wife and I and made sure we were ok. She helped a lot explaining what was going on.

When a doctor had time to talk to us, he introduced himself as a doctor and then explained what was going on. That was completely sufficient. I cared that people were there to do their jobs. I didn't need to understand right then who was who and when I needed to know this, they simply told me who they were. No problem.

In my hospital stay, the women who came around to give medicine or take my blood would wear different scrubs each day. I remember them because they were sometimes colorful flowery type patterns.

I can't think of a time that color coding people in a hospital setting would be helpful to me. But that is just me, I accept that it may be important to other people.

ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Sat 8 Sep, 2012 07:40 pm
@maxdancona,
We get that.

You are not the only patient nor the only one who cares. I insist on arguing (I think of you as a primo arguer) because I think clarity of who your hospital staff people are matters. Maybe or maybe not you are out of it, but your mother or attorney or son may not be 'not caring'.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Sep, 2012 07:40 pm
This conversation makes me think of this...

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/2d/ST_TOS_Cast.jpg
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Sep, 2012 07:43 pm
@maxdancona,
Well, then, maybe they can take care of you.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Sep, 2012 06:53 am
@chai2,
I meant it towards the school uniform being color coded - simply that it was degrading to point out the teens who were heavy vs. the little ones. Asking for a black bathing suit wasn't really helping a teen feel good about herself.

Simply reminded me of the only time I can place where color coding was used in regard to people (and the star trek thing too - anyone know what colors they represented?)
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Sep, 2012 07:08 am
@maxdancona,
maxdancona wrote:
I accept that it may be important to other people.


a thousand years ago, I worked in the rehab unit of a hospital. I was very new to the ways of hospitals. I had to go on rounds - I found it very helpful to know that o.t.'s were in blue, physios were in green, kins were in yellow. Helped me put the information they provided into context. It was probably beneficial to the other folks in attendance that I didn't have to ask what specialties people had.

I think it could be useful for staff in an emergency room setting - they could just look for staff in the right colour to pull in for different types of emergencies. At KGH, you'd certainly have known not to bother grabbing someone in blue, green or yellow.
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Sep, 2012 11:09 am
In addition to color ( if color is used by your hosiptal ) we have medical coding by the style of lab coat worn in the hospital proper.

Medical students always wear white jackets, while MDs always wear long, white coats when doing rounds. Some exceptions of course exist for those groups of medical doctors, who wear scrubs, which may be green, blue and sometimes yellow.

Some confusion does exist for patients however. I've seen opthalmic techs wear scrubs when performing routine eye tests. I don't know why they wear these scrubs, since some patients get the tech mixed up with the ODs and the MDs.
0 Replies
 
drlevenstein
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Mar, 2016 11:54 pm
During your visit to hospital you will see many different uniforms and scrubs Smile
0 Replies
 
 

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