20
   

A dumpster full of books..... :(

 
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 11:27 am
All of the books (and trash) are gone today. I must have just happened upon the books between the time they hit the top of the dumpster and the scheduled trash pick up. My dog needs better poop timing.
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 11:41 am
I don't get it. Would you be so upset by a dumpster full of typewriters, or a dumpster full of slide rules?

Books aren't nearly as valuable today as they were when we kids. There are two reasons for this, first of all, actual books are incredibly cheap to produce and to buy. Secondly, the information in books is readily available in other places.

I had a funny reaction when my daughter started coloring in one of her chapter books. It was pretty creative what she was doing and she did it out of respect for the story.

I had a strong reaction at first. I was taught as a kid that books were valuable, even sacred, and must never be defaced. I started to scold her until I realized that not only was what she was doing pretty cool, but that the book she was "defacing" could be replaced for 4.95 at Amazon. I can imagine that there are lots of schools that have far too many books for the space they have. If they don't have any real value, then throwing them out makes sense.

The idea that books are sacred is outdated. It comes from an earlier time when a physical book would cost a month or more of an average salary. Those times are long gone.

Ideas are sacred. Stories are sacred. Books are just a bunch of pieces of paper glued together.
boomerang
 
  5  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 11:55 am
@maxdancona,
One of the chief ways we share information and stories is through books. So yes, I think books are important.

For 5 years this school nagged me and the parents of 600 other kids to buy books for them. Then they throw them in the trash.

And children's picture books are really quite expensive. (Anyone who visits antique stores can tell you typewriters and slide rules are too.)
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 11:56 am
@maxdancona,
I nearly agree Wink

I made an experience about two years ago, when I tried to sell and donate my father's library (about 6,000 books).
I wanted to donate those, I couldn't sell to antique dealers and in auctions (about 5,000 Smile ) to a (Protestant) charitable institution, with homes and hospitals for the mentally ill and disabled, since they make collections in churches (Catholic and Evangelical/Protestant) all over Germany. I've learnt that they send at least four large (shipping) containers per month to the paper mills ...
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 12:15 pm
@boomerang,
Books were one of the chief ways we shared information 20 years ago. In 20 more years, I doubt that people will have books (i.e. glued together stacks of printed paper) at all except as antiques.

Times change.

Books are a now a commodity. They are cheap and easy to get. A good new child's paperback can be purchased for $5. Our favorite hardcover picture books "D'Aulaires' Book of Norse Myths", sells new on Amazon for $16.47 (the price of a normal dinner at chain Restaurant in Boston).

This doesn't mean that you shouldn't buy books for the school. My daughter's school generally asks for books on a theme or to meet a specific needs. They are requesting access to the information in the book, the stories or the theme, rather than the glued together paper.

When you buy books you are buying a commodity. The paper the books you are buying is made of is inconsequential. What matters it the experience you are giving to the readers.

As the needs of the students and the schools community change, the paper becomes worthless.


0 Replies
 
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 12:18 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Same here. I hope the books go to be recycled and not burned, but our local schools are going digital and at a very quick rate. It's cheaper and easier to update information in the long run. I understand you frustration, Boomer, especially considering it was so recent that the school asked for book funds, but the digital switch is also recent because of ipads and Kindles becoming so accessible. I think in another 10-20 years there will be no paper books in schools other than on display such as you see in museums.

PS Not sure why typewriters are so expensive in your area but my dump has a pile of them in the free shed. The town is probably going to be put them into metal recycle this year.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 12:20 pm
@Green Witch,
If you happened to see a dumpster full of Ipads, please let me know.
voice of Logic 700
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 02:05 pm
@boomerang,
You should! Literacy is important, maybe if you talk to the principal s/he could explain. Or maybe the principal was unaware of this. Being concerned with the well being of the school and stuff like that is the right thing to do. You never know, it might have been some students throwing out books.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 02:57 pm
@boomerang,
I must add to max that not everyone has $4.95 at hand to spend; I would hope that would be self evident, but I guess not.

Anyone look at my Zadie Smith link? I think what she is saying is still true in many places. That was back towards the end of page one.

What I hadn't considered before is that there would be dog poop in the bin, urkk. But, some of those boxes looked to be separate from all that. I see that as a stopper though, for liability reasons, whether or not the books could actually be contaminated.

I still see setting up something for book saving in the future - as you are doing, Boomer - would be a good idea.
Green Witch
 
  2  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 03:07 pm
@maxdancona,
In our society it is just a matter of time...

http://www.corbisimages.com/images/Corbis-42-15368223.jpg%3Fsize%3D67%26uid%3D1524e9fc-9917-4493-b4d3-03bae66bcad5
0 Replies
 
Atom Blitzer
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 03:10 pm
@ossobuco,
You know you can get some text books for free. I found my algebra book and my history book in bit torrent, so two less books to carry home.
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 03:13 pm
@Atom Blitzer,
I gather you need internet access for that.

Not everyone can afford internet access.
Atom Blitzer
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 03:27 pm
@ossobuco,
Do you know what's more expensive than a pdf file of a book or a buying a ebook online, the hard cover text book. In most instances a physical hard cover costs three times as much as its electronic format version.
boomerang
 
  3  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 03:31 pm
@Atom Blitzer,
Are you including the price of the device you read it on and the cost of the internet connection that delivers it?
Atom Blitzer
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 03:35 pm
@boomerang,
The device will pay for itself in the long run if you're a avid book reader, or don't buy it and just use your laptop. If you don't have internet, go to the library and order the ebook online there and download it to your USB.
Now don't you go on about gas money needed to drive to the library.
In a decade or so, hard text will fall on the wayward side. My highschool is switching all textbooks to electronic format next year.
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 03:37 pm
@boomerang,
what's to be gained by edumacating poor folks, boom...
Atom Blitzer
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 03:40 pm
@Rockhead,
What kinda question is that? Everything is to be gained by educating poor folks.
Rockhead
 
  2  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 03:42 pm
@Atom Blitzer,
OK.

we're gonna have to fit you for a satire detector son.

just hold still. this won't hurt a bit...
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 03:44 pm
Here's an interesting article on the haves v. the have nots regarding internet access:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/04/opinion/sunday/internet-access-and-the-new-divide.html?pagewanted=all

I've been trying to find some statistics on technology in the schools but the latest I can find is from 2008. It seems that in our high-tech times we still have several years lag in getting data together.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  3  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 03:49 pm
@Atom Blitzer,
Maybe it will pay for itself in the long run.

Some people don't have even a short run. They don't have a roof over their heads or food in their bellies.

I don't need a lecture about how to get books. I've got every gadget you can name. I'm not just concerned with myself.

I'm guessing you go to a private school.
0 Replies
 
 

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