Reply Mon 13 Aug, 2012 08:30 am
2012 August 13
A Flight Through the Universe
Video Credit: M. A. Aragón (JHU), M. SubbaRao (Adler), A. Szalay (JHU), Y. Yao (LBN, NERSC), and the SDSS-III Collaboration

Explanation: What would it be like to fly through the universe? Possibly the best simulated video of this yet has been composed from recently-released galaxy data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

Every spot in the above video is a galaxy containing billions of stars. Many galaxies are part of huge clusters, long filaments, or small groups, while expansive voids nearly absent of galaxies also exist.

The movie starts by flying right through a large nearby cluster of galaxies and later circles the SDSS-captured universe at about 2 billion light years (a redshift of about 0.15) from Earth.

Analyses of galaxy positions and movements continues to bolster the case that our universe contains not only the bright matter seen, like galaxies, but also a significant amount of unseen dark matter and dark energy.

AMAZING PHOTOS

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=08LBltePDZw&

http://www.sdss3.org/dr9/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sloan_Digital_Sky_Survey

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dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Mon 13 Aug, 2012 03:50 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
Enuf to make you believe in God
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 16 Aug, 2012 10:30 am
@dalehileman,
NASA telescope sees a supermom of a galaxy
By Seth Borenstein, The Associated Press
August 15, 2012

This undated handout artist illustration provided by NASA shows a cosmic supermom. It's a galaxy that gives births to more stars in a day than ours does in a year. Astronomers used NASA's X-Ray telescope to spot this distant galaxy creating about 740 new stars a year. By comparison our Milky Way galaxy spawns just about one new star each year. This new galaxy is about 5.7 billion light years away. It is in the center of a recently discovered cluster of galaxies that give the brightest x-ray glow astronomers have seen. The study appears Wednesday in the journal Nature. (AP Photo/NASA)

This undated handout artist illustration provided by NASA shows a cosmic supermom. It's a galaxy that gives births to more stars in a day than ours does in a year. Astronomers used NASA's X-Ray telescope to spot this distant galaxy creating about 740 new stars a year. By comparison our Milky Way galaxy spawns just about one new star each year. This new galaxy is about 5.7 billion light years away. It is in the center of a recently discovered cluster of galaxies that give the brightest x-ray glow astronomers have seen. The study appears Wednesday in the journal Nature. (AP Photo/NASA)

WASHINGTON - Scientists have found a cosmic supermom. It is a galaxy that gives births to more stars in a day than ours does in a year.

Astronomers used NASA's Chandra X-Ray telescope to spot this distant gigantic galaxy creating about 740 new stars a year. By comparison, our Milky Way galaxy spawns just about one new star each year.

The galaxy is about 5.7 billion light years away in the centre of a recently discovered cluster of galaxies that give off the brightest X-ray glow astronomers have seen. It is by far the biggest creation of stars that astronomers have seen for this kind of galaxy. Other types, such as colliding galaxies, can produce even more stars, astronomers said.

But this is the size, type and age of galaxy that shouldn't be producing stars at such a rapid pace, said the authors of a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

"It's very extreme," said Harvard University astronomer Ryan Foley, co-author of the study. "It pushes the boundaries of what we understand."

The unnamed galaxy — officially known by a string of letters and numbers — is about 3 trillion times the size of our sun, said study lead author Michael McDonald of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

There's another strange thing about this galaxy. It's fairly mature, maybe 6 billion years old. Usually, this kind "don't do anything new... what we call red and dead," McDonald said in an interview. "It seems to have come back to life for some reason."

Because of that back-to-life situation, the team of 85 astronomers has nicknamed the galaxy cluster Phoenix, after the bird that rises from the ashes. The galaxy that is producing the stars at a rate of two per day is the biggest and most prominent of many galaxies there.

It's "helping us answer this basic question of how do galaxies form their stars," said Michigan State University astronomer Megan Donahue, who was not part of the study but praised it.

There is lots of very hot hydrogen gas between galaxies. When that gas cools to below zero, the gas can form stars, McDonald said. But only 10 per cent of the gas in the universe becomes stars, Donahue said.

That's because the energy from black holes in the centre of galaxies counteract the cooling. There's a constant "tussle between black holes and star formation," said Sir Martin Rees, a prominent astrophysicist at the University of Cambridge in England. He was not part of the study, but commented on it during a NASA teleconference Wednesday.

In this case, the black hole in the central galaxy seems to be unusually quiet compared to other supermassive black holes, Rees said. "So it's losing the tussle," he said.

But this massive burst of star birth is probably only temporary because there's only so much fuel and limits to how big a galaxy can get, Foley said.

"It could be just a very short-lived phase that every galaxy cluster has and we just got lucky here" to see it, Foley said.

Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/technology/NASA+telescope+sees+supermom+galaxy/7095185/story.html#ixzz23j9iKTd0
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hater
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Jul, 2013 09:55 pm
@dalehileman,
so what? there's nothing useful out there.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jul, 2013 10:30 am
@hater,
Quote:
there's nothing useful out there.
You mean of course nothing in the immediate vicinity
0 Replies
 
 

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