contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Jul, 2012 02:25 pm
@CalamityJane,
CalamityJane wrote:
sex, hygiene, and the repercussions of family trauma.


Sounds great! Like Flowers In the Attic but with sanitary protection.
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Jul, 2012 02:31 pm
@contrex,
It was more of an chore to read. The book was a gift, it was on the bestseller list in Germany for quite some time - I still don't know why.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jul, 2012 08:12 am
Quote:
E. L. James has introduced millions of women to the world of sadomasochistic erotica through her “Fifty Shades” trilogy. But Anne Rice got there first.

Ms. Rice’s “Sleeping Beauty” trilogy, published in the 1980s under the pen name A. N. Roquelaure, was an underground hit when it was first released. Now, trying to capture some sales from “Fifty Shades” readers searching for their next book in the genre, Ms. Rice’s publisher will rerelease the novels this week with slick new covers.

In case any potential reader misses the point, each book jacket is stamped with a message: “If you liked 50 Shades of Grey, you’ll love the Sleeping Beauty trilogy.”

The reissued books include a new preface by Ms. Rice, who wrote that the novel “Fifty Shades of Grey” proved that “people in general are ‘out of the closet’ as enjoyers of erotic books.”

......

She said that the empowerment of women today had allowed them to freely acknowledge enjoying erotic novels. “Women have just as much right to pornography as men do, and I’m talking about literary porn, erotica,” she said. “If a woman wants to read about being overwhelmed by a pirate, that’s her right.”


More: http://mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/08/in-race-toward-the-erotic-reviving-an-old-trilogy/
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Jul, 2012 01:39 am
The British tabloid newspaper "The Sun" has a story headed "Burning love" about a woman (a "saucy mum") who was so engrossed in the book that she failed to notice that her house was on fire.

"Shona Gilmour, 47, failed to spot that her chip pan was ablaze as she leafed through an “interesting” part of the steamy bestseller.

And she admitted she only tore herself away from the raunchy prose when a sheet of flame EXPLODED across her kitchen."

http://img.thesun.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01546/shona_1546628a.jpg

In British English, "chips" are what Americans call "potato fries", and a "chip pan" is a deep fryer. Electric ones with lids and thermostats are quite common but some people just use a pan of oil on the stove

http://www.thesun.co.uk/scotsol/homepage/news/4426595/Fifty-Shades-of-Grey-fan-misses-chip-pan-blaze.html

Fires caused by the user setting one going and then forgetting about it are quite common; I once had a lucky escape when I lived in an apartment house and the woman who lived below me nodded off because she was on drugs (downers). Luckily it just burnt itself out without setting anything else afire; her apartment looked like a maniac had sprayed everything (everything!) with matte black paint.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Jul, 2012 02:54 am
Americans do not use any such expression as "potatoe fries." There are many different ways that Americans prepare fried potatoes--hash browns and home fries being two forms which are usually served with breakfast. What the English call chips, the Americans call French fries or just simply fries.
contrex
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 15 Jul, 2012 03:17 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
Americans do not use any such expression as "potatoe fries."


1. I see you studied spelling under Quayle.

2. Someone had better tell the USDA

Quote:
Frozen Potato Fries Situation and Outlook

In 2000/01, frozen potato fry exports from the 3 major exporting countries, the United States, the Netherlands, and Canada, are forecast at a record 2.3 million tons, 2.5 percent above the previous year’s shipments. All three countries are expected to register export gains in 2000/01 with Canada leading the trio in export growth. Canada’s exports are forecast to increase 13 percent in 2000/01 to 700,000 tons. Canadian exports have experienced double-digit growth rates for the past several years largely due to the expanding domestic processing industry and favorable exchange rates. U.S. frozen potato fry exports were $338,315 million and 463,890 tons in 1999/2000, almost double the volume and twice the value of just 6 years ago. U.S. fry exports are forecast to increase 5 percent in 2000/01. Rising per capita incomes in many countries, expansion by multinational fast food companies, and Market Access Program activities, are expected to continue to spur demand for frozen potato fries. The Netherlands’ exports of frozen potato fries in 1999/2000 were 1.113 million tons and are forecast at 1.065 million tons for 2000/01.

United States

The U.S. potato crop is estimated at 21.7 million tons for 1999/00, up slightly from last year’s crop of 21.6 million tons. Washington, Wisconsin, Oregon, Colorado, and California had increases in production while Idaho and North Dakota experienced a decline in production. The Western states account for almost 70 percent of total U.S. potato production, with Idaho and Washington being the two largest producers.

About 57 percent of U.S. potato production was processed, of which 29 percent was used to produce frozen potato fries. Today, Russet Burbank is the main variety grown for the production of frozen potato fries. The food service sector accounts for 90 percent of U.S. frozen potato fry consumption while retail accounts for the remaining 10 percent. With a relatively large U.S. potato crop and a steady domestic demand for fries, U.S. frozen potato fry production in 2000/01 is forecast at 3.5 million tons, up from last years level of 3.4 million tons. Over the past five years, U.S. production of frozen potato fries has increased over 2 percent annually.

After a decade of record export gains, exports in 1999/2000 were 463,890 tons, down from the previous year’s level of 473,238 tons. While the U.S. dominates the Japanese market with an 87 percent market share, there was a drop in U.S. frozen potato fry exports to Japan in 1999/2000 after a decade of strong growth. In 2000/01, U.S. exports of frozen fries are projected to increase to 485,000 tons (or 14 percent of domestic fry production), up slightly from the previous year of 463,890 tons.

The top 5 U.S. potato fry markets accounted for nearly 74 percent of 1999/2000 shipments. These countries include Japan with 49 percent of total exports; Mexico and South Korea at 7 percent; Hong Kong at 6 percent, and Taiwan at 5 percent. The United States also exports to Europe, but the outlook for U.S. exports of frozen potato fries to this market in the 2000/01 season is dim, due to adequate supplies of fries in Europe. U.S. exports generally occur when potatoes are in short supply in Europe, such as in 1998/99, when U.S. fry exports to the European Union were 16,010 tons. In general, transportation costs for frozen potato fries from the U.S. Pacific Northwest are far too high to be feasible.

Expansion of the international fast food industry, product quality, rising incomes in many countries, and ongoing Market Access Program activities have all played a role in stimulating demand for U.S. frozen potato fries. Export prospects for the next decade are very promising given the sustained expansion of the international fast food industry.


3.
http://i124.photobucket.com/albums/p29/badoit/PotatoFries2.jpg

4.
http://i124.photobucket.com/albums/p29/badoit/PotatoFries.jpg

5.
http://i124.photobucket.com/albums/p29/badoit/PotatoFries3.jpg

Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Jul, 2012 04:16 am
@contrex,
Yeah, right . . . i've been an American for over sixty years, but you're better informed on the subject than i am. If you're ever in the United States, you be sure to go into a restaurant and order "potato fries." I'd say there are likely to be a couple of predictable responses. One would be a blank stare, followed by "You mean fries? French fries? Home fries? What the hell are you talking about?' The other in many places might well be: "You ain't from around here, are ya." (A statement, not a question.)

Knob
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Jul, 2012 04:24 am
Oooo . . . i found it online . . . i found it on the interwebs . . . it must be true!
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Jul, 2012 04:56 am
8 minutes... is that what passes for lighting wit in your country?
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Jul, 2012 05:00 am
Ha! You're pathetic. Maybe you sit around waiting for opportunities to sneer at people, but i've got better uses for my time.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Jul, 2012 05:32 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
Ha!


I haven't seen "Ha!" used like that for so long.

0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  3  
Reply Sun 15 Jul, 2012 09:02 am
I have to say, I have never heard of "potato fries" until just now.
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  2  
Reply Sun 15 Jul, 2012 12:18 pm
@contrex,
I think this might be one of those things where there is an official term, and then the word everyone uses.

I have only ever used or seen "fries" or "french fries," not "potato fries." Sometimes "home fries."

"Sweet potato fries" are a separate thing, made from sweet potatoes rather than regular potatoes.

(Incidentally, the first image in your Google search screen shot is of fries that are quite orange, probably sweet potato fries.)
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2012 11:24 am
Please burn your 'Fifty Shades of Grey,' urges one British charity
Wearside Women in Need is so outraged by the sado-masochistic bestseller it has organized a “Fifty Shades of Grey” book burning.
http://www.csmonitor.com/Books/chapter-and-verse/2012/0828/Please-burn-your-Fifty-Shades-of-Grey-urges-one-British-charity
0 Replies
 
JoySmith000
 
  2  
Reply Sat 15 Sep, 2012 10:50 am
Anything by Nora Roberts is guaranteed to be good. Right now I'm reading His Every Desire by Emma Rose and it's worth a read as well (though it is a bit...descriptive like fifty shades of grey).
0 Replies
 
 

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