8
   

After Hugo Chavez -?

 
 
georgeob1
 
  0  
Reply Thu 27 Dec, 2012 02:29 pm
@edgarblythe,
I wouldn't be surprised if Chavez manages to get through the inaugriation and them pass the presidency on to his designated successor without an election.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Dec, 2012 04:10 pm
@georgeob1,
That seems to be what he is angling for.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Dec, 2012 10:32 am
Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez has suffered "new complications" after a cancer operation in Cuba, his vice-president has said.

In a televised address from Cuba, Nicolas Maduro said Mr Chavez continued to be in a "delicate state".

Mr Chavez underwent his fourth cancer operation on 11 December in Cuba but suffered a respiratory infection.

The president - who has been in power since 1999 - is due to be sworn in on 10 January for another six-year term.

Mr Maduro did not give details about Mr Chavez's condition but said the latest complications were connected to the respiratory infection.

Abraham Zamorano
BBC Mundo, Caracas
Although Mr Maduro's speech was an obvious blow for Mr Chavez's supporters, the mood in Caracas remains calm - as if people were used to bad news about the president's health.

Many residents are away for the holidays, which increases the subdued mood on the streets. But for those who are still in the city, it is business as usual, with last-minute shopping on New Year's Eve.

Opposition leaders have not yet commented on Mr Maduro's speech. But over the weekend some lawmakers asked for a more detailed medical report.

Most people say Mr Chavez's future is in God's hands. Caracas officials have cancelled the New Year celebrations and asked people to keep the president in their prayers.

"We have been informed of new complications that arose as a consequence of the respiratory infection we already knew about," he said.

"The president gave us precise instructions so that, after finishing the visit, we would tell the (Venezuelan) people about his current health condition.

"The state of health of President Chavez continues to be delicate."

He added that the treatment was "not without risk."

Mr Maduro, appearing solemn, spoke alongside Mr Chavez's eldest daughter, Rosa, his son-in-law Jorge Arreaza, and Venezuelan Attorney General Cilia Flores.

The vice-president said he would remain in Havana "for the coming hours" but did not specify how long.

Secrecy over condition
Following Mr Maduro's announcement, Information Minister Ernesto Villegas appeared in a special programme on Venezuelan TV, calling on Venezuelans not to believe rumours about the president's health.


Late on Sunday, Mr Villegas said a government-organised New Year's Eve concert in central Caracas had been cancelled and he urged Venezuelans to pray for President Chavez.

The BBC's Sarah Rainsford in Havana says it is now three weeks since Hugo Chavez has been seen or heard from in person.

There continues to be huge secrecy surrounding his precise condition, she says.


Venezuelan constitution

Article 231: The president-elect shall take office on January 10 of the first year of their constitutional term, by taking an oath before the National Assembly. If for any reason, (they) cannot be sworn in before the National Assembly, they shall take the oath of office before the Supreme Court.
Article 233:(...) When an elected President becomes absolutely absent prior to inauguration, a new election...shall be held within 30 days.
Article 234: When the President is temporarily unable to serve, they shall be replaced by the Executive Vice-President for a period of up to 90 days, which may be extended by resolution of the National Assembly for an additional 90 days.
There are also many questions about what will happen on 10 January when Mr Chavez is due to be re-inaugurated, our correspondent adds.

National Assembly head Diosdado Cabello recently said that the swearing-in ceremony would be delayed in the case of Mr Chavez's absence.

However, opposition leaders say postponing the inauguration would be unconstitutional.

The constitution states that if there is an "absolute absence" of the president, elections must be held within 30 days.

Mr Chavez has said that, should his health fail, Venezuelans should vote for Mr Maduro in fresh elections.

Officials have never disclosed the type or severity of Mr Chavez's cancer, which was first diagnosed in June 2011.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Mar, 2013 04:15 pm

ABC News
Venezuelan leader Hugo Chávez dies
USA TODAY - ‎12 minutes ago‎
Chávez's political moves brought criticism from the United States and his ties with some of the world's most notorious leaders exacerbated his relationship with Washington.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Mar, 2013 04:19 pm
Vice President Nicolás Maduro will succeed Mr. Chávez as interim president, but must hold a new election within 30 days, according to the constitution.

It seems likely Mr. Maduro will face off against opposition governor Henrique Capriles, who lost to Mr. Chávez in October's presidential election, but retained his governor's seat during an election in December.
georgeob1
 
  0  
Reply Tue 5 Mar, 2013 04:46 pm
@edgarblythe,
We'll see if they follow the constitutional requirements. There have been statements from the military and the government that suggest they might try to evade them. However, I don't know enough to have a firm opinion of the likelihood of that.

Venezuela has a long history of bad, inept government. Whoever follows Chavez will have a hard time continuing his policies. The currency is now thoroughly depreciated and vital imports are more costly than ever. The government's assault on private business has left the country with little remaining productive capacity. Inept management of oil production has yielded still lowering production amid rising foreign demand. Chavez was skilled at using national wealth to buy the support of needed sections of the population, who became very devoted to him for it. However, he did little to help Venezuela's economy in any lasting way. He has certainly pissed away great portions of his nation's natural wealth, and the abundance with which he once paid off his supporters is largely dissapated. Indeed Venezuela's economy is in far worse shape now than 15 years ago. Some will see him as a hero to the poor. However the fact is he screwed them, along with everyone else.

It will also be interesting to see if the very large annual subsidies to Cuba are continued. Venezuela's ability to addord the cost is now much reduced. Chavez may have died just in time.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Mar, 2013 05:06 pm
@georgeob1,
Any economy must balance the good of the nation as a whole to succeed. I may have socialist tendencies, but I am not dumb enough to kill industry in the process of being good to the poor.
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georgeob1
 
  0  
Reply Tue 5 Mar, 2013 05:18 pm
@edgarblythe,
I'm sure you're not. However, history is full of deceitful leaders who built their personal power on the illusion they were helping the poor, while in fact they were merely stealing public and private property, and, more importantly, the freedom of their people, and using it cynically to buy the support of desperate , but foolish, people.

Despite all his heroic self-promotion, Chavez was merely one of a long chain of authoritarian dictators who used what was produced by others to seduce the vulnerable into surrendering their freedom to his rule. Venezuela is much worse off for the experience.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Mar, 2013 05:22 pm
@georgeob1,
It appears you are right about Chavez. But will a new leader be any better?
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georgeob1
 
  0  
Reply Tue 5 Mar, 2013 08:46 pm
@edgarblythe,
Good question. The jury is still out. Venezuela has suffered from both left and right wing authoritarian governments. The excesses of one beget the other. Chavez was one of their worst, and they sorely need to break the pattern. Sadly the conditions for doing so now don't look very good.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Mar, 2013 08:47 pm
I assume the military is right wing in the event they stage a coup.
georgeob1
 
  0  
Reply Tue 5 Mar, 2013 08:51 pm
@edgarblythe,
Maybe not. Chavez himself came from a dissident group in the Army and he has carefully chosen its leaders over the past 12 years. It was one of the leading generals who announced a few months ago that the Army would not allow the "Bolivarian revolution" to be reversed by Chavez' demise. Hard to know just what might be behind such statements.
MattDavis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Mar, 2013 09:20 pm
@georgeob1,
Just a bookmark really.
It has been nice to read back through the conversations George and Edgar Very Happy
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  -4  
Reply Tue 5 Mar, 2013 09:21 pm
@edgarblythe,
Quote:
I assume the military is right wing in the event they stage a coup.


If the military was right wing, Ed, the ongoing terrorism of the US against Venezuela would have already deposed Chavez.

You and Gob go on like this is some theoretical issue.

All the while your governments are funding actions seeking to undermine the government of Venezuela.

Isn't that terrorism, Edgar?
0 Replies
 
Lola
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Mar, 2013 10:36 pm
curiousity bookmark
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  0  
Reply Tue 5 Mar, 2013 10:41 pm
I'm sorry, I may have missed something, but does everyone know that the dictator strong man of Venezuela did in fact finally die today?
 

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