8
   

Are you irrated by trolls who say only buy American?

 
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Mon 28 May, 2012 10:16 am
@Val Killmore,
Val Killmore wrote:
What I have done is not coin a new word, but used a word in a different context


wellllllll, not exactly

troll and trolling already have meanings in the sales/marketing/advertising worlds

they are closely aligned to the way the words are used for fishing - trolling for customers ...

you know those lovely 'qualifying' phone calls people used to (still?) get from life insurance agents - that's a form of trolling

put out the bait, move away slowly, see if the fish/target customer follow

loss leaders in stores are also forms of trolling in the sales/marketing/advertising arena

You haven't used the words in a new context. Just misused them in a context they're already used (wanna see my textbooks from the 1990's?).
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Mon 28 May, 2012 10:23 am
I think part of the linguistic problem here is that the identical words -- 'troll' as a verb and 'troll' as a noun -- have entirely different etymologies and, hence, entirely different meanings. In other words, one has nothing to do with the other. As has been pointed out, the verb comes from a fishing term. The noun, on the other hand, derives from Scandinavian mythology and folklore. Mass confusion inevitably arises if we start treating verb and noun as though they both came from the same source and meant the same thing. They don't.
0 Replies
 
Val Killmore
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 May, 2012 02:13 pm
@Setanta,
Troller means something else to do with fishing.

I used troll specifically because I have heard it used it by my friends in various business fields such as troll marketing is this, troll marketing is that, and customer hogging trolls are harmful to customer-to-business interaction, etc.

I guess you aren't aware of terminologies with the marketing profession, Mr. Know It All.

(I still consider you to be a Grammar Nazi, because this discussion is informal, so what is the point of criticizing the language usage, it is unnecessary)
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 May, 2012 02:15 pm
@Val Killmore,
It seems you've misunderstood how your friends are using the terminology.
Val Killmore
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 May, 2012 02:17 pm
@ehBeth,
Please, would you be kind enough to help me understand how my friends are using the terminology then, if I'm misunderstanding them.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Mon 28 May, 2012 02:46 pm
@Val Killmore,
Sure, Bubba, whatever you say . . . one lie is as good as another to someone who can't admit a mistake . . .
Val Killmore
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 28 May, 2012 03:36 pm
@Setanta,
Oh please, why would I lie? And I haven't made a mistake yet.

Stop trolling my post, your posts deviate people from the subject matter, and the original intentions of my post. I wish there was some ignore button for you.

Here is an example that it's just not my friends who use it.

"The whole trick in this type of environment is you've got to stop the trolls knocking you off the bridge, because there are a number of big trolls out there, and they're getting a bit bigger and hairier," she said. As a result, Ms Garrett-Cox and her team are picking defensive stocks, including Unilever of the UK and Sanofi, the French pharmaceuticals business.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/beware-of-market-trolls-says-investor-7542531.html

So there you go Mr. Grammar Nazi, a troll in the marketing language is competition that use propaganda to steer customers away from your business.

Please correct me, if I made a mistake, Mr. Obnoxious Nitwit.


Setanta
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 28 May, 2012 03:45 pm
@Val Killmore,
There is an ignore function. You make one mistake after another, beginning with the claim that you have used the noun troll appropriately. I'm not the only one who has pointed this out to you. Your example is a reference to the children's story Billy Goats Gruff, from Norway, where the noun troll originated. It does not serve as an example to support your quixotic usage of the noun.

Have a lovely evening, Mr. Fuckwit.
Val Killmore
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 28 May, 2012 07:42 pm
@Setanta,
Man you are too predictable, and it seems I have the knack to get under your skin easily.

You squirm at the aspect of someone trying to change your narrow mindedness on a subject matter.

Language isn't simple and straight forward as you think.
It is sad to see such a pathetic response, and not using the richness and diversity of the English expression to come up with a better response. So now look at who is debasing the English language!

And seriously, stop taking a dump on my post, or I shall have to resort to buying some hounds and hunting you down. Your red furry coat will make a nice cozy hat for the winter.
wmwcjr
 
  2  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2012 01:44 am
@Val Killmore,
Mr. Killmore, there is no need for you to purchase any hounds for the purpose of hunting down Mr. Setanta. He has already been disposed of, and his red furry coat has been fashioned into a nice cozy hat for you to wear this winter. Our manikin's head has kindly agreed to parade this latest product of our proud company before your very eyes. (Please see below.)

http://www.gd-wholesale.com/userimg/46/2433i1/fur-hat-601.jpg
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2012 02:19 am
@Val Killmore,
What a drama queen. I haven't said anyone has "debased" the language. I've simply pointed out that you're using troll inappropriately. Get over youself.
0 Replies
 
IRFRANK
 
  3  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2012 06:52 am
@tsarstepan,
It's difficult to buy an 'American' car. I work for a Japanese company, make brakes for the Corvette, in America. (Columbia, SC). All cars are international at this point. Regardless of what Detroit says.
0 Replies
 
IRFRANK
 
  2  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2012 06:54 am
@Val Killmore,
Quote:
Troll as in someone who drives a civic with a bumper sticker
"Real Americans Buy American"


Honda's have some of the highest 'American content'.
Val Killmore
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 May, 2012 01:19 pm
@IRFRANK,
It doesn't matter, even if a Honda is 90% American content, without that 10%, that car won't hit production line.

Making one's main criteria for buying a product to be American made is quite idiotic.
"Patriotic purchasing" is quite a propaganda these days, with the American businesses trying to get a customer.
The kind of cars Americans buy is but just a fraction of the problem of our economy.
America is dependent on foreign economy, as much as others are dependent on us.

Consumers like efficiency and value for money, not to buy a piece of crap that will break down out of some misguided belief that it will keep a countryman his or her job. The truth is most of those jobs have been outsourced or given to robots, which is just another corporation practicing capitalistic rights.

One can't simply, take out foreign market out of the American business infrastructure.

If Real Americans only buy American, then Americans won't have anything in their bank account as savings.

Besides cars, USA labor (w/ our unions) = expensive American-made products

The products will be more expensive than identical foreign products
So, this won't most likely help the American economy at all.
0 Replies
 
 

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