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DNA inheritance

 
 
Reply Tue 22 May, 2012 03:27 am
Would a man have DNA that matched his maternal grandfather? This is for a crime story, help, please!
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Type: Question • Score: 3 • Views: 2,097 • Replies: 12
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jespah
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 May, 2012 05:15 am
@Pauline Rendall,
I don't think anyone can inherit exact, precise, perfect matching unless they're a clone. He has a maternal grandmother, plus he has a father, yes? So he should have DNA from them as well.
Pauline Rendall
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 May, 2012 07:32 am
@jespah,
Thanks, but not quite. He has a mother and a grandfather, but only the grandfather is available.
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 May, 2012 08:03 am
@Pauline Rendall,
It doesn't matter who's available - he's still the child of his mother and his father. Half of his DNA will come from his father.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 May, 2012 08:26 am
@Pauline Rendall,
There are cases of family member's DNA being used to track down the real culprit.

Quote:
Using DNA to catch criminals has become common, but police in Denver, Colorado, this year demonstrated how the practice can be taken to a new level: They tracked down a suspect not through his DNA, but through that of his brother.

Here's how it happened, the Denver district attorney's office said:

In February 2008, two cars were broken into. Police found blood at both scenes and ran the samples through DNA databases but couldn't find a match. Then, as part of a study being conducted by the district attorney's office, investigators used new software to see whether the DNA in the blood was close enough to potentially be from a family member of someone in the criminal DNA database.
The software came up with six potential matches. Five didn't pan out, but one led police to a convicted car thief and, ultimately, that man's brother, Luis Jaimes-Tinajero.

Jaimes-Tinajero pleaded guilty in September to one count of criminal trespass and received a sentence of two years' probation.

Attempts to contact Jaimes-Tinajero for this report were unsuccessful.

District Attorney Mitch Morrissey called it one of the first cases in the country to use software to find familial DNA matches.

"Our hope here is to show that it works, which we have done," he said. "I think it's a valuable way to generate leads."

Morrissey's office developed the software tool with the Denver police, he said. He hopes to use it to solve murders, rapes and cold cases.

The matches to family members won't be used as evidence itself, he said, but rather as a way to generate leads for investigators to explore, similar to the way police may use a witness report of a partial license plate.


http://articles.cnn.com/2009-11-17/justice/colorado.family.dna_1_dna-cold-cases-stephen-mercer?_s=PM:CRIME
Pauline Rendall
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 May, 2012 09:03 am
@izzythepush,
Great, thanks. I was a bit thrown because I'd downloaded DNA charts from the internet and they showed Mtc going down the maternal line and Y-markers going down the paternal line and I couldn't see where they might meet in the line that I needed to follow. But I'm sorted now, thanks very much.
Ceili
 
  2  
Reply Tue 22 May, 2012 09:05 am
Mitochondrial DNA comes from your mother, and Y-Chromosome DNA from your father.
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izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Tue 22 May, 2012 10:09 am
@Pauline Rendall,
Lets not forget the science on this is still ongoing. At the moment you may not be able to look at someone's DNA, and say it's definitely from someone else's grandfather, but I wouldn't be surprised if you could in ten years time.
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 May, 2012 10:19 am
@izzythepush,
Amazing. That story kind of tells us that the cost of DNA use has come way down if they can do all this for a charge of criminal trespass.
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Tue 22 May, 2012 10:26 am
@Pauline Rendall,
Pauline Rendall wrote:

Would a man have DNA that matched his maternal grandfather? This is for a crime story, help, please!

Yes, definitely. Half of the GrandFather's DNA goes into making the Mother. Half of the Mother's DNA goes into making the child (the Man). Every generation can also carry replication errors (mutations) and combinations which are completely unique to each individual. But I believe these represent a tiny fraction of the genome (in a healthy individual).
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 May, 2012 10:34 am
@roger,
It also shows how quickly technology is moving, they only discovered blood groups in 1900. Now they can identify you from your brother's sweat.
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 May, 2012 10:36 am
@izzythepush,
thank (deity of ones choice) i don't have a brother
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 May, 2012 11:08 am
@djjd62,
I do, but he's not that sweaty.
0 Replies
 
 

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