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MUST READ BY NEIL deGRASEE TYSON! Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier

 
 
Reply Sun 1 Apr, 2012 09:13 am
Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier [Hardcover]
by Neil deGrasse Tyson, Avis Lang, Editor

Book Description
Publication Date: February 27, 2012

A thought-provoking and humorous collection on NASA and the future of space travel.

Neil deGrasse Tyson is a rare breed of astrophysicist, one who can speak as easily and brilliantly with popular audiences as with professional scientists. Now that NASA has put human space flight effectively on hold—with a five- or possibly ten-year delay until the next launch of astronauts from U.S. soil—Tyson’s views on the future of space travel and America’s role in that future are especially timely and urgent.

This book represents the best of Tyson’s commentary, including a candid new introductory essay on NASA and partisan politics, giving us an eye-opening manifesto on the importance of space exploration for America’s economy, security, and morale. Thanks to Tyson’s fresh voice and trademark humor, his insights are as delightful as they are provocative, on topics that range from the missteps that shaped our recent history of space travel to how aliens, if they existed, might go about finding us.

Editorial Reviews

“A genial advocate for the space program, Tyson offers diagnoses of its malaise that will resonate with its supporters.” (Booklist )

“An enthusiastic, persuasive case to start probing outer space again.” (Kirkus Reviews ) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Neil deGrasse Tyson is an astrophysicist with the American Museum of Natural History, director of the world-famous Hayden Planetarium, a monthly columnist for Natural History, and an award-winning author. He has begun production of a new Cosmos series, premiering in early 2013. He lives in New York City.

READER REVIEW:

February 19, 2012
By Scott - See all my reviews

On October 4, 1957, the first artificial satellite, Sputnik 1, was launched into orbit. This technological first marked the beginning of a new era of competition between the former Soviet Union and the United States. While on the surface the Space Race might have appeared to be spurred on by man's desire for knowledge and exploration, in truth, the only thing that made man's footprints on the Moon possible was the looming Cold War and aspiration to assert technological dominance over each other. Adjusted for inflation, the Apollo program today would cost over 200 billion dollars, twenty times the yearly budget of NASA. It is unlikely any of us alive today will ever see man step foot on the Moon or another planetary surface, or see the equivalent of what millions of people witnessed on July 20, 1969 when Apollo 11 landed on the Moon. The overwhelming costs, technological hurdles, and political backdrop are what make the Space Race such a fascinating subject, and it would be hard to find someone who is so passionate about it or conveys these ideas better than astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson.

Like his last novel Death by Black Hole: And Other Cosmic Quandaries, Space Chronicles is a compilation of previously-published articles and talks over the last fifteen years, with a central theme of the Space Race and exploration (although some of the chapters don't really fit this theme entirely). It is mostly centered on the United States' involvement with a look at the development of NASA. It contains an original prologue by Dr. Tyson with a discussion on Space Politics, with a focus on the last three presidential administrations. A selection of Dr. Tyson's tweets (which are usually interesting facts about the Universe) are scattered in relevant sections throughout the book, and add short distractions to the current chapter. The rest of the book is divided into three sections:

Part 1 - Why - Articles detailing with the reasons humans desire to explore space

Part 2 - How - Articles concerned with how we have overcome the barriers to space entry.

Part 3 - Why Not - These chapters are mostly ideological articles and speeches about why we should explore space.

The last third of the book contain Appendices related to NASA and space travel. I think they're a nice addition to Space Chronicles, although I'm pretty sure they were added as filler, since without them, the actual content of the book is only 220 pages. All of them are easily found online but they make a nice reference while reading and I frequently found myself going back to them. They consist of:

National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (the law that created NASA)
NASA's budget from 1959-2010

2010 Space Budgets for the United States and Globally
Space Budgets: US and Non US: 2010

Anyone who has enjoyed Dr. Tyson's previous books will enjoy Space Chronicles. Since it doesn't deal with as much cosmology, it is a bit easier read than his last book, Death by Black Hole: And Other Cosmic Quandaries. I also found it more persuasive. Space exploration is a subject Dr. Tyson excels at. For anyone who has ever heard him give a speech on the subject, he offers up very convincing reasons for the necessity of a space program, many which will resonate long after finishing the book. A great example of this is the final chapter in the book, which is a speech given at the University of Buffalo that I originally saw two years ago, and still has a powerful impact on me today. Unlike Death by Black Hole, which seemed to be a bit thrown together and thematically forced, the articles that make up Space Chronicles flow much easier into each other and under their relevant chapters, although you will notice some repetition throughout them. The speeches that make up some of the chapters are also well-adapted, although I strongly encourage anyone who enjoys them to go back and watch the original videos, or actually, to just skip those chapters and watch the videos instead (especially the last chapter). The main reason Dr. Tyson is so successful as a media figure is due to his ability to convey subject matter to his audience, and he does this best in person, where his passion and oration can really stand out.

Almost all of the material from this book is already available publicly online. The only original material I noticed was the prologue and a poem (Ode to Challenger, 1986). Although it's been published before, I think the editor has done an excellent job in culling through Tyson's large body of work to pick the best material, and arranged it in a way that makes for an intriguing (albeit very short) read. Some of the chapters are as short as one paragraph, others are a dozen pages or so. Tyson's most ardent fans might find the material a bit too familiar, but as a whole, Space Chronicles presents itself as a nicely-wrapped look at the last fifty years of space travel, and what's in store for the future. All of the material works well in the book, but all of the chapters adapted from speeches are much better when viewed in their original video presentation. Other than the length of the book, the only real criticism I could give it is that it doesn't source the original material. A few of the chapters do this and actually state at the top that they are from videos, but most of them don't. I can't figure out any rhyme or reason to including this information on some but not others, which would seem simple enough to do (I was able to find almost all of it in about an hour). If you are interested in reading some of the articles or videos from the book, I will provide links to all of those that I've been able to find that are in the public domain, as well as book previews from the publisher and Google Books in the review comments below.
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BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Apr, 2012 09:25 am
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
This is a wonderful C-SPAN program by Neil deGrasse Tyson that will inspire you. BBB

Space Chronicles
Mar 15, 2012

American Museum of Natural History

Neil deGrasse Tyson talks about the history and future of NASA and the US space program. He argues that the exploration of space benefits Americans more than they may think. Hosted by theAmerican Museum of Natural Historyin .

http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/305092-1

0 Replies
 
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Apr, 2012 12:01 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
I always enjoy this fellow. He has that natural gift of easily conveying otherwise complicated topics in the scientific world and getting people interested.

Thank you for posting about this read, BBB.
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  2  
Reply Sun 1 Apr, 2012 12:07 pm
@Sturgis,
You have good taste in people. I so admire Neil deGrasse Tyson.

BBB
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Apr, 2012 12:13 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
A former school pal, who also landed in teaching science (apparently our high school knew how to churn out science teachers), had the opportunity and found him as easy going and informed in person as he is in his writings and video appearances.
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  2  
Reply Sun 1 Apr, 2012 12:16 pm
@Sturgis,
I know you will enjoy this ALOT!

http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/305092-1

BBB
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Sun 1 Apr, 2012 12:35 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
This is a wonderful find! Having viewed the first few minutes, I have set it to the side for this evening, very glad to have it.
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OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Sun 1 Apr, 2012 02:28 pm

If aliens DID find us, we 'd be in BIG trouble.

( bad enuf with the Mexicans )
0 Replies
 
 

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