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They Did It To Pluto, But Not To Pink! Please Not Pink!

 
 
Reply Fri 2 Mar, 2012 10:57 am
They Did It To Pluto, But Not To Pink! Please Not Pink!
March 2, 2012
by Robert Krulwich - NPR

Pluto isn't a planet anymore. It's been demoted. Now it's pink's turn. I'm talking about the color pink. It turns out (and this is not a new development, it's just something I didn't know), there is no pink in a rainbow. It isn't there.

Red is there. Violet is there. Green is there. Blue, too. They are bands of light that scientists can measure. So they are out there. They exist.

Rainbow

Curiously, however, when you look at a rainbow, you will notice that red is on one side, violet on the opposite side.

This is a problem. Because pink happens when the red and violet sides get together, but they don't get together — which makes pink an act of wishful thinking, or, to put it bluntly — pink is a made up color.

I am shocked.

I know, of course, that all colors are just waves of light, so every color we "see," we see with our brains. But what this video says is that there is no such thing as a band of wavelengths that mix red and violet, and therefore, pink is not a real wavelength of light. That's why pink is an invention. It's not a name we give to something out there. Pink isn't out there.

So when we look at puffy clouds at sunset, at a carnation, this color we talk about when we say pink slip, pink collar, pretty in pink, tickled pink, in the pink, Pinky Lee, Pink Panther, Pink Floyd — this color doesn't exist, except in our brains.

I had no idea.

PHOTO AND VIDEO:
http://www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/2012/02/28/147590898/they-did-it-to-pluto-but-not-to-pink-please-not-pink
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 2 Mar, 2012 11:08 am
I wonder if there is any connection between female brain chemistry and a little girl's affinity for the color pink.
Eva
 
  3  
Reply Fri 2 Mar, 2012 12:21 pm
This is ridiculous...and wrong. Pink is a tint of red. Take red paint, add white, and you get pink.

And Butrflynet, it's social conditioning. A hundred years ago, pink was for baby boys, and pale blue was for baby girls. My father's birth certificate (1921) had a pink ribbon on it. The reasoning then went like this...Pink is a pastel version of red, which was considered a strong, masculine color. Blue was considered beautiful but passive, so the pastel version of it was thought to be feminine.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 2 Mar, 2012 12:23 pm
@Butrflynet,
Me too. That affinity seems to be too universal to be learned, doesn't it?
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 2 Mar, 2012 12:24 pm
@Eva,
I guess I should have held up on the enter key for another two minutes.
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  2  
Reply Fri 2 Mar, 2012 12:28 pm
@Eva,
Mixing paint isn't the same thing as mixing light.

Light is additive. Add white light to red light and you get white light.
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 2 Mar, 2012 12:37 pm
@parados,
I looked at the light from some of my crystal prisms to see if I could see any pink in the refraction. All I see are the same colors in a rainbow.

Interestingly, some images that are supposed to be depicting a prism's refraction do include what looks like the color pink.

0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 2 Mar, 2012 12:44 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
Who puts pink in a rainbow?

Roy G. Biv:

Red
Orange
Yellow
Green
Blue
Indigo
Violet


While pink has never been in the rainbow, of course it's a color.
0 Replies
 
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Fri 2 Mar, 2012 12:44 pm
@parados,
Yes, this whole theory is based on light, not pigments. I suppose if they want to claim there is no such thing as pink light, they might have a case. But to claim the color doesn't exist when it DOES exist in pigments is ridiculous. And wrong.
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Fri 2 Mar, 2012 12:47 pm
Crayola speaks:

These be the pinks:
82 Piggy Pink 1998
83 Pink Flamingo 1998
84 Pink Sherbet 1998

But no PINK

Joe(I pinky swear)Nation
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Fri 2 Mar, 2012 01:05 pm
@Joe Nation,
Thank you, Joe! Crayola has spoken!

I don't believe this theory because it holds that pink doesn't exist because scientists can't identify it and measure it. Scientists can only identify and measure seven colors: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet. That leaves out brown, gray, lavender, PINK, and about a thousand other colors.

What a silly theory.
Strauss
 
  1  
Reply Fri 2 Mar, 2012 01:13 pm
Wiki wrote:
The human eye can distinguish about 10 million different colors
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Fri 2 Mar, 2012 02:53 pm
@Eva,
You know where you go to adjust your computer screen and it says:

Optimize Visual Display
and you click on it and it gives you two choices:

True Color
Millions of Colors

??

Joe(only women can see millions of colors, ask any house painter)Nation
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Fri 2 Mar, 2012 03:33 pm
@Joe Nation,
Joe(only women can see millions of colors, ask any house painter)Nation




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVMDS3qeLb8

DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 2 Mar, 2012 03:35 pm
@Eva,
It is kind of ridiculous, but it isn't wrong.

Pink is basically an optical illusion.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2012 04:05 am
@DrewDad,
I like fuchsia.

0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2012 04:55 am
@Frank Apisa,
I've been telling that joke for years and never knew it was in a movie!

Thanks.

Joe( Cool )Nation
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2012 07:25 am
@Eva,
Eva wrote:
This is ridiculous...and wrong. Pink is a tint of red. Take red paint, add white, and you get pink.
Yes; that is the significant point. Pink is lite red.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Mar, 2012 07:29 am
to quote some wise men (guys?)

the band is just fantastic
that is really what i think
oh by the way
which ones pink
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Mar, 2012 08:07 am
Behold:

Quote:
The trouble begins when Krulwich imagines the visible spectrum curling up into a circle, with pink the missing slice between red and purple. “Pink happens when the red and violet sides get together, but they don’t get together—which makes pink an act of wishful thinking, or, to put it bluntly—pink is a made up color,” he writes.

Perhaps you are as confused by this statement as I am (and, I suspect, Krulwich is). He cites as evidence a short animated video from the ordinarily great Minute Physics team. I’ve embedded the video below so you can watch for yourself, but the important part for our purposes is their explanation of where pink comes from:

Quote:
If you try to roll up the rainbow to make a color wheel, there will be a gap between red and violet. That’s where all of the rest of the light in the universe is supposed to go—radio waves, microwaves, infrared, ultraviolet, x-rays, gamma rays and so on. But since we can’t see any of those wavelengths, we replace all of that hidden grandeur with pink.


This explanation is so muddle-headed and absurd that I hardly know where to begin. The classical electromagnetic spectrum extends from a wavelength of zero meters all the way up to infinity. How is one to connect those two ends? And even if one could, adding two (or more) invisible wavelengths together would never produce something visible. Infrared light plus ultraviolet light is just that—a combination of infrared and ultraviolet. They do not average out to yellow.

On a more fundamental level, however, Krulwich is right. Pink is not out there, because no color is really “out there.” The world is full of electromagnetic radiation, and the only intrinsic properties that this radiation possesses are physical ones such as wavelength and intensity. Color, on the other hand, is all in your head. “Color is not actually a property of light or of objects that reflect light,” wrote the biologist Timothy H. Goldsmith in his 2006 Scientific American article What Birds See. “It is a sensation that arises within the brain.” My colleagues at Scientific American Mind have for years been elucidating the ways in which the optic system converts electromagnetic radiation into color, a mysterious and fascinating process (and one that can go wrong in interesting ways). Recent research even indicates that people can be made to see “forbidden colors“—greens that are tinted red, or blues that appear yellow.

Pink is real—or it is not—but it is just as real or not-real as red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet.


(Bold emphasis mine, italics in original.)

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/2012/03/05/stop-this-absurd-war-on-the-color-pink/
0 Replies
 
 

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