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chillin' with chiles and chilis

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 15 Feb, 2012 07:05 pm
@InfraBlue,
Oh, and glad you're here, talk more please.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 15 Feb, 2012 07:27 pm
So when I clicked on Penzeys, a purveyor I don't just hate off hand but seems out of scope here, they said no when I typed chile - but hey, I was instructed when I landed here, it's spelled chile.

http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penzeys/c-SpicesAs_Herbs_and_Seasonings.html
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InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Feb, 2012 11:45 pm
I haven't had La Posta's carne adobada, I've got to try it the next time my family and I go.

There's a chile colorado dish that's similar to carne adobada, asado de puerco.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_aP4DPESR2ps/SUXF7zRBNXI/AAAAAAAAADA/tOfMCIaYe6c/s400/Asado+de+Puerco.JPG

It calls for chile ancho and chile guajillo, and among other things, half of an avocado stone, which is ground, and which serves as a thickening agent.

As far as powdered chile goes, I don't see the point if one is going to be using dried chiles in the first place.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 18 Feb, 2012 03:08 pm
@InfraBlue,
I don't know enough to know the point.. since compatible dried chiles would seem to do the job.

Your photo looks quite similar to the dish I made..


edit: wondering how you grind an avocado stone (something that has never occurred to me to do) - hold it with, say, some pliers, hit it with a hammer, put it in manual coffee grinder thing?
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Feb, 2012 05:14 pm
@ossobuco,
Aha, here's how to grind an avocado stone:

http://www.rawfoodinfo.com/articles/art_avocadostonescrub.html


Yesterday I bought another package of dried chiles.
I'm beginning to catch on that a Mexican company calls them chilis, New Mexican, chiles.
This package had two names for the pods, Puya Chile, Pulla Chile, and on the front of the package, Chili Puya.
This time the package described it: "This is similar to the guajillo chile, only smaller and more potent. It has a fruity flavor that's good in salsa and stews.

OK, then, I'll use that along with the New Mexico mild ones mentioned in another post in my next adobado effort (soon, soon).
Googling, it has mexican origin, is 5000-8000 SHU.

0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Feb, 2012 05:42 pm
@ossobuco,
why grind an avocado stone ? is it nutritious...tasty?

{Edit: oh...thickening agent, huh? I see a recommendation in smoothie recipe for a half a seed ground up finely per 32 oz smoothie to keep the frothing down --- as a thickener. It is high in potassium and phosphorous, I think. And can be used as body scrub}
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InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Feb, 2012 05:58 pm
The blogger uses a coffee grinder to grind the avocado stone.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Feb, 2012 06:15 pm
@InfraBlue,
Right, so I sort of guessed right, but didn't think of drying it first. Well, I often dry them, since they are quite beautiful, before I toss them, and back in my never really a hippie days I used to plant them in a pot to no avail. They'd grow, but then I'd throw them out. (My aunt in West LA had a wonderful avocado tree, Haas variety. Too bad I thought they were squishy when I was a kid. Besides, you know, being green.)


Adds, infrablue, I've bookmarked that blog.
0 Replies
 
 

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