27
   

Should homeschoolers be allowed to play on public school teams?

 
 
Rockhead
 
  3  
Reply Sun 12 Feb, 2012 03:41 pm
@Thomas,
ok.

but sport teaches lessons, just like the classroom.

except maybe more rooted in real life.

I would not trade my high school playing field experiences for a whole nother year of book study...
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Feb, 2012 03:42 pm
@Thomas,

Ceili wrote:
I think you under estimate sport.
Thomas wrote:
I disagree, on the basis of having met plenty of young Germans and young Americans fresh out of high school. School sports teams are pervasive in America, practically non-existent in Germany. Nevertheless, I have found both groups practically equal in their capabilities for team work and fair play, discipline, and all of that. (I can't speak to hand-eye coordination.) The differences between the groups are negligible compared to the differences between individuals within each group. I'm not going to pretend I've run a controlled study, because I haven't. But if school sports made an important difference, I would have noticed that difference between the young German and American grown-ups I have worked with. And I haven't.
I believe that is very plausibly paradigmatic.





David
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Feb, 2012 03:49 pm
@Rockhead,
Rockhead wrote:
I would not trade my high school playing field experiences for a whole nother year of book study...

How about playing-field experiences outside of school? You can play team sports in private sports clubs, or in the YMCA, or in Boy Scouts. Or a bunch of guys can spontaneously get together in the park and play ball. What's so special about sports teams put together by schools?
Rockhead
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Feb, 2012 03:51 pm
@Thomas,
"How about playing field experiences outside of school? You can play team sports in private sports clubs, or in the YMCA, or in Boy Scouts."

only if your parents want to spend the bucks to do it.

mine said no...

the Y and the scouts had no programs here at that time. not sure that they do now. certainly not baseball.
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Feb, 2012 04:02 pm
@Thomas,
"bunch of guys can spontaneously get together in the park and play ball. What's so special about sports teams put together by schools? "


coaching...
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Feb, 2012 04:57 pm
@Rockhead,
I strongly want to emphasize this. I learned things about baseball and basketball from my first coach (his successor was a doofus) that experience hadn't taught me, and which i hadn't learned in PE. Hell, i learned things about running from this guy--nobody had ever told me that if i could develop the stamina to turn the half mile into a sprint rather than a long-distance event, i'd beat almost all comers (he didn't promise me a rose garden). I did, and i beat everyone i met until i got to state. He taught me about running on your toes in a sprint--never let you heel hit the ground. He assessed my performance, decided my ankles might prove too weak, and showed me how to tape up my ankles before every track meet.

It would take pages and pages to tell what he taught me (us) about baseball and baketball.

Good point, Boss.
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Feb, 2012 06:30 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Hell, i learned things about running from this guy


Did he chase you?
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  3  
Reply Sun 12 Feb, 2012 06:52 pm
You may joke if you wish. The point is that, although i had previously leaned toward Thomas' position, Rockhead's remark made me rethink my position. As soon as i read it, i thought of my first high school coach, and how much i learned from him. When you're right, you're right, and Rockhead is definitely right about that aspect of organized sports in school.
0 Replies
 
wmwcjr
 
  2  
Reply Sun 12 Feb, 2012 08:11 pm
@Rockhead,
Rockhead wrote:
Re: Thomas (Post 4894632)
ok.

but sport teaches lessons, just like the classroom.

except maybe more rooted in real life.

I would not trade my high school playing field experiences for a whole nother year of book study...

What lessons did you learn from sport?
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2012 05:50 am
@wmwcjr,
That 's a good, probing question, Bill.





David
boomerang
 
  3  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2012 07:16 am
@wmwcjr,

Quote:
What lessons did you learn from sport?


Speaking as the parent of a child who does not do particularly well at school due to some learning disabilities I can say that I think he has learned a lot from sports.

He's learned to keep trying, to keep working at something, to learn from his mistakes, and to move on. Because he really enjoys playing sports and he knows that as he gets older his grades are one of the things that will allow him to play on the school's teams he has transferred these lessons to his school work.

Schools really pit student against student and my son doesn't feel very valued there. In sports, even the sports he isn't very good at, he feels that he's making a contribution.

For a lot of kids his age (11), words of encouragement coming from parents fall flat. They've heard it so much from their parents that they stop listening. Hearing that they have value outside the family circle means a lot.
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2012 07:33 am
@boomerang,

Quote:
What lessons did you learn from sport?
boomerang wrote:
Speaking as the parent of a child who does not do particularly well at school due to some learning disabilities I can say that I think he has learned a lot from sports.

He's learned to keep trying, to keep working at something, to learn from his mistakes, and to move on. Because he really enjoys playing sports and he knows that as he gets older his grades are one of the things that will allow him to play on the school's teams he has transferred these lessons to his school work.

Schools really pit student against student and my son doesn't feel very valued there. In sports, even the sports he isn't very good at, he feels that he's making a contribution.

For a lot of kids his age (11), words of encouragement coming from parents fall flat. They've heard it so much from their parents that they stop listening. Hearing that they have value outside the family circle means a lot.
Is he learning anything from gunnery practice ?
U know, the Author of America's Declaration of Independence,
the 3rd President of the US and Founder of the University of Virginia
recommended proficiency in gunnery practice, in preference to ball games.
He thought it builds character.





David

Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2012 07:38 am
@boomerang,
Quote:
For a lot of kids his age (11), words of encouragement coming from parents fall flat. They've heard it so much from their parents that they stop listening. Hearing that they have value outside the family circle means a lot.


A very important insight--one i suspect many parents haven't thought about.
0 Replies
 
wmwcjr
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2012 08:14 am
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:
Re: wmwcjr (Post 4894930)
That 's a good, probing question, Bill.





David

Thank you, David. Smile
0 Replies
 
wmwcjr
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2012 08:20 am
@boomerang,
Thank you for providing an interesting insight I had not considered. Smile Kids can have a rough time in school. I'm happy for the reinforcement your son receives in sports. Smile
0 Replies
 
wmwcjr
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2012 08:35 am
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:
Re: boomerang (Post 4895354)

< snip >

Is he learning anything from gunnery practice ?

Most likely, gunnery practice is not offered at his school. Sad
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2012 10:36 am
@wmwcjr,
OmSigDAVID wrote:
Re: boomerang (Post 4895354)

< snip >

Is he learning anything from gunnery practice ?
wmwcjr wrote:
Most likely, gunnery practice is not offered at his school. Sad
When I 've gone for gunnery practice lately,
it has not occurred to me to attend a school.

Gunnery ranges r better for that.
Some of them have fully automatic weapons
and rent u their whole display cases.





David
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2012 10:39 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Kids have to be 12 years old before they're allowed to take the gun safety classes that would allow them to use the shooting range.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2012 10:41 am
@boomerang,
boomerang wrote:
Kids have to be 12 years old before they're allowed to take the gun safety classes that would allow them to use the shooting range.
I see.

I wonder how thay know
whether he is 11 or 12.





David
0 Replies
 
Ceili
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Feb, 2012 10:50 am
@Thomas,
In Canada our #1 sport is hockey, it is rarely played as a school sport until college or university. Soccer is the fastest growing sport. It's played from on community teams from age 4 and on school teams from grade 6, I think...
Germany has one of the best football teams in the world and some of the best players? Where did they learn to play? Do they have a system of community based teams only? Do kids not play soccer/football in school at all? This seems odd to me.
I've traveled a fair bit and no matter where I've been, it seems to me schools always have a field, an clear area where kids play games. I've stumbled across quite a few pick-up matches. I've watched cricket in India and baseball in Puerto Rico. In Thailand, my hotel window overlooked a school yard that seemed to have an endless soccer game going on. These kids played because they loved the game, like most people who play sports. They wouldn't try out, go to practice or get up early for a game if they didn't love the game and want to improve.

I think sport in the US is a wee bit different though, in that, it has been something that has always seemed to cross the dividing lines. It's the only thing in the US that doesn't care what colour, religion, where you're from, what you do, how fat you are, if you're handicapped or gay... everyone can be on the bandwagon, everyone can join the club, there's an understanding among fans that if you're wearing that jersey or hat, you'r family... At least until the game is over.
Every time I've been south of the border and we are in a boring long line up, my husband and I have a running joke. He'll starts talking about sports and the whole line of people eventually jump in and start talking, it's amazing. I keep waiting for the day people will look at him like he's from Mars, hasn't happened yet. People don't feel threatened or uncomfortable talking about sports. It may seem like a pack mentality, but I think it's more than that, it's an identity of common ground.
 

Related Topics

Kid wouldn't fight, died of injuries - Discussion by gungasnake
Weed Out Individualism at an Early Age - Discussion by gungasnake
Public school zero tolerance policies. - Question by boomerang
Dismantling the DC voucher program - Discussion by gungasnake
Adventures in Special Education - Discussion by littlek
home schooling - Discussion by dancerdoll
Can I get into an Ivy League? - Question by the-lazy-snail
Let's start an education forum - Discussion by cicerone imposter
 
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 01/21/2022 at 06:21:13