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Is it a great insult or not?

 
 
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2011 05:36 am

I think that the employees at the local passport office said the 95-year-old man was "like a dog with a bone" is a great insult. It is unbearable! What do you say?

Context:
Schoolcraft says they tried to dissuade him from pursuing the matter. Employees at the local passport office scared them, telling her father "If he pursued it, (he could) possibly be deported or [be] at risk of losing Social Security."

"We keep telling him, leave it alone, leave it alone, and he won't, like a dog with a bone," Schoolcraft told the Centralia Chronicle. But Davidson says: "I want to get it done before I die." He also still wants to visit his friends and family in Canada. Sen Patty Murray's office is helping him with his application.


More:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/yblog_thelookout/20110324/us_yblog_thelookout/wwii-vet-discovers-hes-not-a-u-s-citizen
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Type: Question • Score: 4 • Views: 3,836 • Replies: 30
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engineer
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2011 06:23 am
@oristarA,
No, it is not particularly insulting in regular conversation. It means someone has an issue they just can't let go of (even if it is in their best interest to do so.) Often this is an issue that is very important to the person but of much lesser importance to everyone else.
0 Replies
 
PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2011 07:08 am
In the West, this would not be derogatory. In fact, it shows dertermination and resolve. He is not going to let go of this issue until it gets solved.

Not an insult, at all.

Other cultures may view this as calling a man a dog.

But, to me, this describes this man as being able to hold on tightly to something he wants.

0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2011 07:23 am
Thank you both.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Mar, 2011 11:27 am
@oristarA,
The determination with which a dog, especially a terrier, refuses to give up a bone is a subject of admiration. To be thus compared is no insult in English-speaking countries.


oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2011 02:22 am
@contrex,
contrex wrote:

The determination with which a dog, especially a terrier, refuses to give up a bone is a subject of admiration. To be thus compared is no insult in English-speaking countries.


Cool.
Thanks
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2011 02:45 am
@oristarA,
I think I meant that it was an "object" of admiration. I think that I should clarify that saying that somebody was "like a dog with a bone" over something, meaning that the person persistently refused to give up some idea or objective or thing, may or may not indicate impatience with that person's stubborn attitude. The context will make this clear. However in Western cultures dogs are not depised animals and there will be no insult perceived merely because of the comparison with a dog.

In fact, dogs are widely prized as pets and companions and admired for various qualities such as intelligence, bravery, faithfulness, persistence, obedience, etc. Many people in my country believe that in countries like China, Korea, etc, people eat dogs and treat them as worthless pests. This is seen as being barbaric and cruel.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2011 02:49 am
I dunno . . . i like eatin' hot dogs . . .

http://images2.makefive.com/images/experiences/dining/top-meals-for-college-students/hot-dogs-7.jpg

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_xVYjgDk9WP4/R1GLASCj7BI/AAAAAAAAAA0/jCdKp4I6D60/s1600-R/HotDogs.jpg
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2011 02:54 am
Now Set, youve done gone and confuzzled me all to get out.

Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2011 03:06 am
Then my work is done here.
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2011 05:13 am
@contrex,
contrex wrote:

I think I meant that it was an "object" of admiration. I think that I should clarify that saying that somebody was "like a dog with a bone" over something, meaning that the person persistently refused to give up some idea or objective or thing, may or may not indicate impatience with that person's stubborn attitude. The context will make this clear. However in Western cultures dogs are not depised animals and there will be no insult perceived merely because of the comparison with a dog.

In fact, dogs are widely prized as pets and companions and admired for various qualities such as intelligence, bravery, faithfulness, persistence, obedience, etc. Many people in my country believe that in countries like China, Korea, etc, people eat dogs and treat them as worthless pests. This is seen as being barbaric and cruel.



How informative!

Thanks alot.
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2011 05:15 am
@dadpad,

What is Dadpad saying, Set?

dadpad wrote:

Now Set, youve done gone and confuzzled me all to get out.

Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2011 05:24 am
@oristarA,
"Confuzzled" is a made-up word, and basically means confused. "All get out" (which i had always thought was an Americanism, but maybe not) means to a great and inexpressible extent. It is an intensifier. "Done gone and" is taken from the speech of country boys. DP was indulging his humorous side.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2011 06:15 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

"All get out" (which i had always thought was an Americanism, but maybe not) means to a great and inexpressible extent.


As a BrE speaker, "all get out" is definitely an Americanism, but we Brits are doggone accustomed to using American colloquialisms jocularly, sho 'nuff.

oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2011 06:15 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

"Confuzzled" is a made-up word, and basically means confused. "All get out" (which i had always thought was an Americanism, but maybe not) means to a great and inexpressible extent. It is an intensifier. "Done gone and" is taken from the speech of country boys. DP was indulging his humorous side.


Good.

Sorry I've failed to understand "Done gone."
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2011 06:29 am
@oristarA,
Apologies Ori.
I'm aware that humour often doesnt cross the cultural divide. We have discussed this before on your translated jokes thread.
I thought you might be sufficiently well versed in English to see that I was attempting humour and that even if you didnt quite understand you would be drawn to ask and therfore learn something new. (That seems to have worked at least.)

I used the americaism ('done gone' and "all get out") as a way of expressing my (supposed) confusion so that others would realise I was attempting humour and not actually confused. Confuzzeld is a made up word that most english speakers would recognise. It's made from the two words confused and puzzled.
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2011 06:39 am
@dadpad,
Youve "done gone" and ..... a (supposed) colloquialism from southern rural America usually associated with less well educated folk.

Now you've done it! you've gone and confused me.

does that help?
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2011 07:10 am
@dadpad,
dadpad wrote:

Youve "done gone" and ..... a (supposed) colloquialism from southern rural America usually associated with less well educated folk.

Now you've done it! you've gone and confused me.

does that help?



Thanks.

Not very clearly got it.

You've done it = you've finished it?
You've gone = you've lost?





dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2011 07:23 am
@oristarA,
Remeber that colloquialisms dont necessarily have to make good english sense or be directly translateable.

Youve "done gone" and.... Substitute "have" .
You have confused me
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Mar, 2011 07:25 am
@oristarA,
oristarA wrote:


Not very clearly got it.

You've done it = you've finished it?
You've gone = you've lost?


1. "Now you've done it!"

You need to consider this as a complete phrase. It is slang and here means "Now you have done or said or written something which annoys me (or will annoy somebody else)", although I think dadpad was being jocular.

2. The slang phrase "gone and" is used to express exasperation at a reckless, careless, thoughtless, foolish or otherwise deplored act; they do not affect the meaning otherwise. It does not imply that the person physically "went" anywhere.

I allowed you to drink out of a valuable glass, and now you've gone and broken it! (and now you've broken it and I am angry)

I told Jim that Mary was pregnant and he promised not to tell anyone, but now he's gone and told her mother! (now he's told her mother and I am angry)


 

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