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all get out = insane?

 
 
Reply Thu 30 Dec, 2010 12:55 am

Context:

Both of whom are as boring as all get out. Two rich and jobless people who do nothing but go to clubs and complain about petty garbage.
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 1,926 • Replies: 10
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Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Thu 30 Dec, 2010 01:15 am
The stock phrase "as _____ as all get out" is simply an intensifier, it means greatly, or to a great extent. It was as hot as all get out = it was very, very hot. So, in this case, . . . as boring as all get out means very, very boring.
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Fido
 
  2  
Reply Thu 30 Dec, 2010 01:42 am
@oristarA,
oristarA wrote:


Context:

Both of whom are as boring as all get out. Two rich and jobless people who do nothing but go to clubs and complain about petty garbage.

Agreed that it is an intensifying adjective, but it is old style, hillbilly sort of colloquial, which makes the question of clubs seem inapproriate since clubing is more English, in my opinion, and also nearly begs the question: If they are so boring, then why are they subject of any conversation... The hint of protestant snobbery shines through well enough... Jobless is the equal of worthless, and nonproductive, and even to some: Unvirtuous... But how would anyone ever get rich, or so little value money as to thorow it away on drink and conversation if the they actually worked for their wages???

As a statement of fact, both sentences together are cursed with ambiguities and incongruities... It is meant to paint and demean the idle, snobbish rich, and rather displays an envy and admiration of them.
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OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Dec, 2010 02:44 am
@oristarA,

All get out = completely.

It was completely boring.
People who use this language usually are not well educated, lower class.
Fido
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Dec, 2010 03:28 am
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:


All get out = completely.

It was completely boring.
People who use this language usually are not well educated, lower class.

Would beg to differ... Colloquial is defined as: belonging to the words, phrases and and idiom characteristic of conversation and informal writing, according to Websters, and I agree that is what this sentence is; characteristic of conversation from the Latin Colloquy, conversation, together, plus speech.... It says the label [colloq] is used throughout the dictionary in that sense and does not indicate substandard or illiterate usage... I have heard the expression many times in my life, though it is some what dated, and not by especially uneducated people, but neither is it thought upper class to gossip, though slander and contumely are better than a gun at bringing the greats down a notch whether they deserve it or not....
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OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Dec, 2010 04:53 am

I stand by what I said.
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Dec, 2010 07:54 am
Thank you all
0 Replies
 
Fido
 
  0  
Reply Thu 30 Dec, 2010 09:03 am
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:


I stand by what I said.
I only wish I cared....
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JTT
 
  0  
Reply Thu 30 Dec, 2010 03:27 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Quote:
People who use this language usually are not well educated, lower class.


OmSig's proof for this arrant drivel he writes; "he stands by what he says"!

I think that you simply took exception to the description of those in the example sentence, Om; it hit home, didn't it?
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contrex
 
  2  
Reply Thu 30 Dec, 2010 04:47 pm
JTT, have you ever thought about getting a "life"?
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Thu 30 Dec, 2010 09:32 pm
@contrex,
Thanks for your concern, C, but it seems like you blow with the four winds.

First I'm on 'ignore', then you're all worried about my daily goings on. What'll it be next?
0 Replies
 
 

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