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topic for my term paper

 
 
Reply Sat 4 Dec, 2010 02:18 pm
hello, i ve to write a term paper on semantics or syntax.. my instructor asked me
to choose a topic from these types ... please help me because i have not found a topic yet.
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Type: Question • Score: 3 • Views: 3,829 • Replies: 7
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tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Dec, 2010 02:29 pm
@red rose,
Well when students come to this forum they often forget to mention the necessary context:
What grade are you in? High school or college?
It matters because of the level of work needed to be done. I hope its nothing higher then freshman college as it shows a sad sack attitude and poor level of academic preparedness to such important assignment.
How many pages and how much does this paper count in terms of one's total grade? When is it due?
If all you have is a 2 or 3 page paper that's worth less then a pebble's drop in your total grade then why come to us for such a simple task that's handled in an hour. On the other hand... if you have a major project that needs pages of endnotes and an extensive annotated bibliography then I will pray for your academic soul since you're arbitrarily coming here for help.

What kind of library access do you have?
Librarians are the greatest academic source for help. Especially college librarians who are delighted to have students actually ask them for help. They can help you aim and target the subject for your paper as well as where to find the primary sources and secondary analysis.
0 Replies
 
laughoutlood
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Dec, 2010 10:27 pm
@red rose,
merry christmas
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Dec, 2010 01:45 am
@red rose,
Quote:
se·man·tics
noun pl but singular or pl in constr \si-ˈman-tiks\
Definition of SEMANTICS
1
: the study of meanings: a : the historical and psychological study and the classification of changes in the signification of words or forms viewed as factors in linguistic development b (1) : semiotics (2) : a branch of semiotic dealing with the relations between signs and what they refer to and including theories of denotation, extension, naming, and truth
2
: general semantics
3
a : the meaning or relationship of meanings of a sign or set of signs; especially : connotative meaning b : the language used (as in advertising or political propaganda) to achieve a desired effect on an audience especially through the use of words with novel or dual meanings


Origin of SEMANTICS
(see semantic)
First Known Use: 1893


Quote:
syn·tax
noun \ˈsin-ˌtaks\
Definition of SYNTAX
1
a : the way in which linguistic elements (as words) are put together to form constituents (as phrases or clauses) b : the part of grammar dealing with this
2
: a connected or orderly system : harmonious arrangement of parts or elements <the syntax of classical architecture>
3
: syntactics especially as dealing with the formal properties of languages or calculi
See syntax defined for English-language learners »

Origin of SYNTAX
Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French sintaxe, from Late Latin syntaxis, from Greek, from syntassein to arrange together, from syn- + tassein to arrange
First Known Use: 1574
Rhymes with SYNTAX


These two quotes are from the Webster Dictionary definitions above:

the study of meanings: the historical and psychological study and the classification of changes in the signification of words or forms viewed as factors in linguistic development.

the way in which linguistic elements (as words) are put together to form constituents (as phrases or clauses) b : the part of grammar dealing with this.


Here are definitions of some more word definitions; any of which would be good syntax and semantic topics for your term paper at any education level. The higher the grade level, the deeper into the etymology of the words you'll want to dwell.

Quote:
A homonym ('same name') is a word that has the same pronunciation and spelling as another word, but a different meaning.

For example, mean (an average) and mean (nasty) are homonyms. They are identical in spelling and pronunciation, but different in meaning.

Here are some more homonyms:
- punch (a drink) and punch (a hit)
- dog (an animal) and dog (to follow closely)
- bat (an animal) and bat (baseball equipment)

Homonyms are by definition also homographs and homophones (see below).


A homograph ('same writing') is a word that has the same spelling as another word, but a different meaning.

For example, punch and punch are homographs, but so are bow (Robin Hood's weapon) and bow (the front of the ship). Homographs don't have to be pronounced the same way.


A homophone ('same sound') is a word that has the same pronunciation as another word, but a different meaning.

For example, punch and punch are homophones, but so are creak (the sound) and creek (a tiny river). Homophones don't have to be spelled the same way.

Here are some more homophones:
- there, their and they're
- to, too, and two
- led and lead (the metal)
- weak and week

Many puns rely on homophones for their humour.

To summarize:

* Homonyms sound the same and are spelled the same, and have different meanings.
* Homographs are spelled the same (but need not sound the same), and have different meanings.
* Homophones sound the same (but need not be spelled the same), and have different meanings.

[Note: there is no universal agreement on these definitions. Some dictionaries or reference works may have alternate definitions.]

But wait ... there's more!


Heteronyms, or heterophones ('different name') are spelled the same, but have different pronunciations and meanings.

For example, desert (to abandon) and desert (a dry region) have the same spelling, but are pronounced differently, and have different meanings.

(Heteronyms are homographs that are pronounced differently ... or homographs that aren't homophones).


Contronyms, or antagonyms have opposite meanings in different contexts.

For example, cleave can mean to stick together, or to split apart.


Capitonyms are spelled the same but have different meanings when capitalised.

For example:
- polish (to shine something) and Polish (from Poland). These are pronounced differently.
- caterpillar (the insect) and Caterpillar (the machinery company). These are pronounced the same.

Capitonyms may or may not be pronounced the same.
0 Replies
 
red rose
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Dec, 2010 09:06 am
actually , i would like to thank you all for your helping.
i am a fresh student in a college . i have to write a term paper of three pages.
unfortunately , i do not ve access to a library in my college . At the same time, i would like to choose an interesting topic.
could you plz provide me with suggestions about a free online library or some interesting topics in semantics or syntax?
thanks all
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Dec, 2010 09:09 am
@red rose,
What kind of college doesn't have a library? Are you enrolled in beauty college?
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Dec, 2010 03:01 pm
@red rose,
Quote:
could you plz provide me with suggestions about a free online library or some interesting topics in semantics or syntax?


I just did. Look up ^
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Dec, 2010 03:02 pm
@Butrflynet,
A free online library? Have you met Google?
0 Replies
 
 

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