Reply Thu 30 Sep, 2010 05:46 pm
So, I was at albertson's. I usually buy my olives from bins at another store, and haven't liked the ones from albertson's in the past, just a couple of times, but...

I'm here. I scoop up some oil cured olives at 8.99 a pound. Criminy. I weighed them on the meat slicing scale, when no one was about. Half a pound and more, in memory, .54 pound. They were already in the container, or I would have tossed half.

Still, I had them in the plastic container and decided to go with it, and learn to scoop less in the future. Plus, I can use them and they last a long time in my refrigerator.

So, I get to the check out counter and my bill for the olives is $3.50.



Tell me about meat scales, produce scales, and yadda yadda.





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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 1,148 • Replies: 6
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Sep, 2010 05:52 pm
@ossobuco,
I suppose you could calibrate the produce scales by tossing in a package of meat that is labeled by weight. Maybe not. I'm betting the scales are more accurate that the stated weight on the meat, but at least if they're radically different, you know one isn't right.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Sep, 2010 05:58 pm
@roger,
I was used to lab scales, in the past. How can grocery store scales vary, from the meat counter to the checker? People don't check, or 'they' jerry rig. Not to accuse, but this seems simple enough to explore.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Sep, 2010 06:06 pm
@ossobuco,
I was an early one to freak on regulation. At one clinical lab, we had a state inspector, whom I remember as the persona of an evil bitch original, insisting we take the temperature of our refrigerators and freezers every day and chart that. And clean the coils extremely often, and chart that.

This was early times, and I suppose that is all done naturally now, but we were plotzed.

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parados
 
  2  
Reply Thu 30 Sep, 2010 08:29 pm
@ossobuco,
plastic container.

The produce scale is probably set to subtract the weight of the container.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Sep, 2010 08:48 pm
@parados,
But the produce scale had the high number, and the cash register the lower.



I figure it is some answer like this, wondering.
parados
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Sep, 2010 08:57 pm
@ossobuco,
Cash register would weigh less because it subtracts the weight of the container before recording weight.

Both container and item weighed .54 at meat scale

$3.99 at $8.99 a pound would mean the cash register recorded .39 pounds to charge you for.

.54 - .39 means the container would have weighed .15 pounds or 2.4 ounces.


They probably set the scale for the highest weight container since they can probably only charge for item weight under the law. Trying to adjust the scale for each container would be difficult and lead to errors that might violate the law.
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