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Wal-Mart signifies all that is wrong in America

 
 
McGentrix
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Dec, 2003 11:58 am
Paris hilton thought Walmart was a place to walls and stuff for walls.
0 Replies
 
PDiddie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Dec, 2003 12:12 pm
The excerpt following is from the LA Times online; to read it you must register (it's free and similar to the NYT, for those of you who have done that).

Quote:
Chastity Ferguson kept watch over four sleepy children late one Friday as she flipped a pack of corn dogs into a cart at her new favorite grocery store: Wal-Mart.

The Wal-Mart Supercenter, a pink stucco box twice as big as a Home Depot, combines a full-scale supermarket with the usual discount mega-store. For the 26-year-old Ferguson, the draw is simple.

"You can't beat the prices," said the hotel cashier, who makes $400 a week. "I come here because it's cheap."

Across town, another mother also is familiar with the Supercenter's low prices. Kelly Gray, the chief breadwinner for five children, lost her job as a Raley's grocery clerk last December after Wal-Mart expanded into the supermarket business here. California-based Raley's closed all 18 of its stores in the area, laying off 1,400 workers.

Gray earned $14.68 an hour with a pension and family health insurance. Wal-Mart grocery workers typically make less than $9 an hour.

"It's like somebody came and broke into your home and took something huge and important away from you," said the 36-year-old. "I was scared. I cried. I shook."


An Empire Built on Bargains Remakes the Working World
0 Replies
 
Dartagnan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Dec, 2003 01:02 pm
McGentrix wrote:
Paris hilton thought Walmart was a place to walls and stuff for walls.


I read somewhere that she rehearsed that line. Some of her apparent cluelessness, one suspects, is an act for the camera.
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hobitbob
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Dec, 2003 04:18 pm
Wal-Mart:
Fat women in pink stretch pants reeking of tobbacco and beer waddling down the aisles, five runny-nosed ill mannered children in tow.
Year-supply of cheetos in cart, she continues, happily lost in her dreams of upper middle classdom.
Outside, lifts trunk of older car, "Power of Pride" sticker prominently diplayed, sighs, scratches buttocks.
Inside the car, children wail, KYGO blaring, home to wait for her love to return from the lumberyard. Proud to be American.
0 Replies
 
PDiddie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Dec, 2003 04:24 pm
hobitbob wrote:
Wal-Mart:
Fat women in pink stretch pants reeking of tobbacco and beer waddling down the aisles, five runny-nosed ill mannered children in tow.
Year-supply of cheetos in cart, she continues, happily lost in her dreams of upper middle classdom.
Outside, lifts trunk of older car, "Power of Pride" sticker prominently diplayed, sighs, scratches buttocks.
Inside the car, children wail, KYGO blaring, home to wait for her love to return from the lumberyard. Proud to be American.


Shocked

Change the call letters and that coulda been here in Deep-In-The-Hearta.

Man, bob, you really need to, like, stay away from Wally's.

It's starting to affect, you know, your whole outlook.
0 Replies
 
PDiddie
 
  1  
Reply Sun 18 Jan, 2004 08:36 pm
More compassion for their associates from the retail giant:

Quote:


Locked In by Wal-Mart
0 Replies
 
BlueMonkey
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 12:09 am
SealPoet wrote:
They can run their store any damn way they please.

But they can't force me to shop there.

It's a store for the sheep that make up a scant majority of this country. (but not the majority of a2k members).


I have yet to read all of the post but I am almost done. This one struck me though. Alwasy the minority of anything likes to make fun of the majority becuase they are the majority. Lame. Had everyone been in the minority with them they would become the majority but that wouldn't be so much fun now would it. It is always fun to be the smallest, correct? That is why you stick up for the lame mom and pop shops that cost and arm and a leg to shop at? They are so helpless in their quest to stay open until the owners die. (roll eyes here)

I am not a sheep. I do not ba nor do I have to be shaved for the comfort of lame dork humans. I well groomed having nothing to do with being outside eating grass. I shop at Wal-Mart and nothing you can say-so far to this point- can make me stop shoping there.

This whole sweat shop thing is so over done. I have seen them. I know. I know they exist. I know they use them. But what Americans don't see is that is what some countries need. Even if they use kids so what. Maybe those kids are working to feed their famlies. It is apparent that if they didn't need to work they would not be working there. Just because it is called a sweat shop doesn't make it evil.

Sheep, ha. How about everyone who doesn't go to Wal-Mart are whinners because it is apperent that that holds some truth. That is all I read here. So far.
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BlueMonkey
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 12:18 am
PDiddie,

They complain when they are not protected from the outside of the world of theft they complain when they think it is too much. There is no happy medium. I do not feel empathy for him. He should have crushed his ankle. It just didn't happen. It must have been his fault. Otherwise it would have been in the story. But since it was his fault don't put it in because if they did he would lose sympathy points. Well he lost them all with me.
0 Replies
 
BlueMonkey
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 12:26 am
hobitbob wrote:
Wal-Mart:
Fat women in pink stretch pants reeking of tobbacco and beer waddling down the aisles, five runny-nosed ill mannered children in tow.
Year-supply of cheetos in cart, she continues, happily lost in her dreams of upper middle classdom.
Outside, lifts trunk of older car, "Power of Pride" sticker prominently diplayed, sighs, scratches buttocks.
Inside the car, children wail, KYGO blaring, home to wait for her love to return from the lumberyard. Proud to be American.


I am a fit 23 year old male who has a stable income and goes to Wal-Mart. I would not move to another city if it didn't have a Wal-Mart. Wal-Mart is a God send. I live in a major city and I have many choices but I go to Wal-Mart. Oh and there is this thing called H.E.B. and I go there also. I like it. I don't like Mom and pop shops because they are small and boring and I could careless for the prices they so chose to use. H.E.B. is a thing of Texas. It is growing also. You soon will be complaining about that too. Good luck on that.

you people are so sad. And I love that the Majority of the people in this country go to Wal-Mart and to H.E.B. (if they live in Texas) and yall are the minority not going. But I am the minority in this discussion. I love it. Yall are not the minority in this discussion I am. And yes that is the reason why I love it.
0 Replies
 
PDiddie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 07:15 am
Good morning, Blue Monkey.

Glad you found this thread and weighed in.

I'm also glad you like shopping at Wal-Mart. As you have observed, many of us don't.

That's primarily a function of what we have learned about the business practices of the company.

Here's a bit more about that (in the excerpt and link that follows). I don't expect it will change your mind. It may persuade some who are more ambivalent than you about the issue not to shop there. I hope so:

Quote:
Wal-Mart is now the world's biggest corporation, having passed ExxonMobil for the top slot. It hauls off a stunning $220 billion a year from We the People (more in revenues than the entire GDP of Israel and Ireland combined).

Wal-Mart cultivates an aw-shucks, we're-just-folks-from-Arkansas image of neighborly small-town shopkeepers trying to sell stuff cheaply to you and yours. Behind its soft homespun ads, however, is what one union leader calls "this devouring beast" of a corporation that ruthlessly stomps on workers, neighborhoods, competitors and suppliers.

Despite its claim that it slashes profits to the bone in order to deliver "Always Low Prices," Wal-Mart banks about $7 billion a year in profits, ranking it among the most profitable entities on the planet.

Of the 10 richest people in the world, five are Waltons--the ruling family of the Wal-Mart empire. S. Robson Walton is ranked by London's "Rich List 2001" as the wealthiest human on the planet, having sacked up more than $65 billion in personal wealth and topping Bill Gates as No. 1.

Wal-Mart and the Waltons got to the top the old-fashioned way--by roughing people up. The corporate ethos emanating from the Bentonville headquarters dictates two guiding principles for all managers: Extract the very last penny possible from human toil, and squeeze the last dime from every supplier.

With more than one million employees (three times more than General Motors), this far-flung retailer is the country's largest private employer, and it intends to remake the image of the American workplace in its image--which is not pretty.

Yes, there is the happy-faced "greeter" who welcomes shoppers into every store, and employees (or "associates," as the company grandiosely calls them) gather just before opening each morning for a pep rally, where they are all required to join in the Wal-Mart cheer: "Gimme a 'W!'" shouts the cheerleader; "W!" the dutiful employees respond. "Gimme an A!'" And so on.

Behind this manufactured cheerfulness, however, is the fact that the average employee makes only $15,000 a year for full-time work. Most are denied even this poverty income, for they're held to part-time work. While the company brags that 70 percent of its workers are full-time, at Wal-Mart "full time" is 28 hours a week, meaning they gross less than $11,000 a year.

Health-care benefits? Only if you've been there two years; then the plan hits you with such huge premiums that few can afford it--only 38 percent of Wal-Marters are covered.

Thinking union? Get outta here! "Wal-Mart is opposed to unionization," reads a company guidebook for supervisors. "You, as a manager, are expected to support the company's position. ... This may mean walking a tightrope between legitimate campaigning and improper conduct."

Wal-Mart is in fact rabidly anti-union, deploying teams of union-busters from Bentonville to any spot where there's a whisper of organizing activity. "While unions might be appropriate for other companies, they have no place at Wal-Mart," a spokeswoman told a Texas Observer reporter who was covering an NLRB hearing on the company's manhandling of 11 meat-cutters who worked at a Wal-Mart Supercenter in Jacksonville, Texas...

Wal-Mart is an unrepentant and recidivist violator of employee rights, drawing repeated convictions, fines, and the ire of judges from coast to coast. For example, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has had to file more suits against the Bentonville billionaires club for cases of disability discrimination than any other corporation. A top EEOC lawyer told Business Week, "I have never seen this kind of blatant disregard for the law."

Likewise, a national class-action suit reveals an astonishing pattern of sexual discrimination at Wal-Mart (where 72 percent of the salespeople are women), charging that there is "a harsh, anti-woman culture in which complaints go unanswered and the women who make them are targeted for retaliation."

Workers' compensation laws, child-labor laws (1,400 violations in Maine alone), surveillance of employees--you name it, this corporation is a repeat offender. No wonder, then, that turnover in the stores is above 50 percent a year, with many stores having to replace 100 percent of their employees each year, and some reaching as high as a 300 percent turnover!

Then there's China. For years, Wal-Mart saturated the airwaves with a "We Buy American" advertising campaign, but it was nothing more than a red-white-and-blue sham. All along, the vast majority of the products it sold were from cheap-labor hell-holes, especially China. In 1998, after several exposes of this sham, the company finally dropped its "patriotism" posture and by 2001 had even moved its worldwide purchasing headquarters to China. Today, it is the largest importer of Chinese-made products in the world, buying $10 billion worth of merchandise from several thousand Chinese factories...

Wal-Mart does not want the U.S. buying public to know that its famous low prices are the product of human misery, so while it loudly proclaims that its global suppliers must comply with a corporate "code of conduct" to treat workers decently, it strictly prohibits the disclosure of any factory names and addresses, hoping to keep independent sources from witnessing the "code" in operation.

...workers (were interviewed) in China's Guangdong Province who toil in factories making popular action figures, dolls and other toys sold at Wal-Mart. In "Toys of Misery," a shocking 58-page report that the establishment media ignored, (Charlie Kernaghan of the National Labor Committee) describes: 13- to 16-hour days molding, assembling, and spray-painting toys--8 a.m. to 9 p.m. or even midnight, seven days a week, with 20-hour shifts in peak season.

Even though China's minimum wage is 31 cents an hour--which doesn't begin to cover a person's basic subsistence-level needs--these production workers are paid 13 cents an hour.

Workers typically live in squatter shacks, 7 feet by 7 feet, or jammed in company dorms, with more than a dozen sharing a cubicle costing $1.95 a week for rent. They pay about $5.50 a week for lousy food. They also must pay for their own medical treatment and are fired if they are too ill to work.

The work is literally sickening, since there's no health and safety enforcement. Workers have constant headaches and nausea from paint-dust hanging in the air; the indoor temperature tops 100 degrees; protective clothing is a joke; repetitive stress disorders are rampant; and there's no training on the health hazards of handling the plastics, glue, paint thinners, and other solvents in which these workers are immersed every day...

These factories employ mostly young women and teenage girls. Wal-Mart, renowned for knowing every detail of its global business operations and for calculating every penny of a product's cost, knows what goes on inside these places. Yet, when confronted with these facts, corporate honchos claim ignorance and wash their hands of the exploitation: "There will always be people who break the law," says CEO Lee Scott. "It is an issue of human greed among a few people."

Those "few people" include him, other top managers, and the Walton billionaires. Each of them not only knows about their company's exploitation, but willingly prospers from a corporate culture that demands it. "Get costs down" is Wal-Mart's mantra and modus operandi, and that translates into a crusade to stamp down the folks who produce its goods and services, shamelessly building its low-price strategy and profits on their backs.

Worse, Wal-Mart is on a messianic mission to extend its exploitative ethos to the entire business world. More than 65,000 companies supply the retailer with the stuff on its shelves, and it constantly hammers each supplier about cutting their production costs deeper and deeper in order to get cheaper wholesale prices. Some companies have to open their books so Bentonville executives can red-pencil what CEO Scott terms "unnecessary costs."

Of course, among the unnecessaries to him are the use of union labor and producing goods in America, and Scott is unabashed about pointing in the direction of China or other places for abysmally low production costs. He doesn't even have to say "Move to China"--his purchasing executives demand such an impossible lowball price from suppliers that they can only meet it if they follow Wal-Mart's labor example. With its dominance over its own 1.2 million workers and 65,000 suppliers, plus its alliances with ruthless labor abusers abroad, this one company is the world's most powerful private force for lowering labor standards and stifling the middle-class aspirations of workers everywhere.

How high a price are we willing to pay for Wal-Mart's "low-price" model? This outfit operates with an avarice, arrogance and ambition that would make Enron blush. It hits a town or city neighborhood like a retailing neutron bomb, sucking out the economic vitality and all of the local character. And Wal-Mart's stores now have more kill-power than ever, with its Supercenters averaging 200,000 square feet--the size of more than four football fields under one roof...

By slashing its retail prices way below cost when it enters a community, Wal-Mart can crush our groceries, pharmacies, hardware stores, and other retailers, then raise its prices once it has monopoly control over the market...

Indeed, Wal-Mart operates as a massive wealth extractor. Instead of profits staying in town to be reinvested locally, the money is hauled off to Bentonville, either to be used as capital for conquering yet another town or simply to be stashed in the family vaults (the Waltons, by the way, just bought the biggest bank in Arkansas).


And there's more at this link.
0 Replies
 
gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 08:08 am
Quote:
I would not move to another city if it didn't have a Wal-Mart.


BlueMonkey, I'm sorry, but that's the scariest thing I've heard since coming to this site.
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lost my calgon
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 09:35 am
I agree that wal-mart employees should form a union.

I only shop at wal-mart simply because they have everything I need and their prices are low.

They have lay-away and generally take anything back without a receipt.

If another store like...Kmart or Target could match their prices and figure out a way to make it easier to shop without bumping into people all the time then I would switch in a heartbeat.

But in todays economy where jobs are limited...desperate people for a job are going to work wherever they can get hired. At this point I don't think it matters how your treated at work. I think what matters is that you can bring home a paycheck. It's not right and wal-mart abuses this but thats just the way it is. And will always be until our economy grows strong...which will never happen.
0 Replies
 
BlueMonkey
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 01:36 pm
gustavratzenhofer wrote:
BlueMonkey, I'm sorry, but that's the scariest thing I've heard since coming to this site.


Boo!
0 Replies
 
BlueMonkey
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 01:56 pm
Thanks to Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., up to $7 million in Sam Walton Community Scholarships will be awarded in 2004. Every Wal-Mart and SAM'S CLUB will have two $1,000 Sam Walton Community Scholarships to award in May. Applications are now available in Wal-Mart stores and SAM'S CLUB locations and from high school counselors, with an application deadline of February 1, 2004.



The Wal-Mart Teacher of the Year program annually recognizes thousands of outstanding educators across the country. Our customers have the opportunity to nominate a teacher of their choice each year through an in-store nomination and balloting process, which will take place during the month of February. One outstanding teacher is recognized in each of our 3,500+ Wal-Mart Store, SAM'S CLUB, Distribution and Transportation facilities each year. Each winning teacher is recognized on National Teacher's Day (Tuesday, May 4, 2004), with a $1,000 grant that is donated back to the teacher's school.



Since 1985, Wal-Mart has actively supported one of the world's most vital student movements, Students In Free Enterprise (SIFE). Founded in 1975, SIFE is a positive grassroots student organization active on more than 1400 college and university campuses in 33 countries with the mission of helping others achieve their dreams through free enterprise education.



There are currently 90 million Americans who have trouble reading and/or writing. More than 44 million function at the lowest literacy level, and many cannot complete a simple job application. People with low-level literacy skills face daily challenges when confronted with everyday tasks like following street signs or paying bills.

In 2001 Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. took on the challenge of helping to improve the literacy level in America. With a Wal-Mart facility in almost every city across this country, we believe it is our responsibility to help combat these alarming statistics.

In support of that initiative, each of our 3,500+ Wal-Mart Stores, SAM'S CLUB's, Transportation and Warehouse facilities donate a monetary grant to a local literacy organization (grant amounts vary from $1,000-$2,500 per location). To date, Wal-Mart has donated over $10 million to the cause of literacy, helping non-profit literacy groups in thousands of communities across the country that are helping to teach people how to read.




Wal-Mart and its associates were recently awarded the prestigious "Corporate Patriotism Award," sponsored by the Employer Support for Guard & Reserve (ESGR) at the 9th annual American Veteran Awards: A Tribute to Freedom on November 21, 2003.

This award is presented each year to a company that exhibits exceptional support and dedication to the ideals of AVA in raising awareness and support of U.S. service members and their families. The award is open to any American corporation who donates substantial resources, without corporate financial gain, in assisting veterans, active duty military and reservists.

The Corporate Patriotism Award was presented by Jeffrey Katzenberg, co-principal of DreamWorks SKG, to Tom Coughlin, vice chairman of Wal-Mart. The national broadcast of this ceremony will be shown on the History Channel on February 8th, 2004 at 7:00pm ET/PT (check your local listings).

Wal-Mart's Tradition of Supporting Our Troops and Veterans.
During World War II, Wal-Mart founder, Sam Walton and his brother Bud joined thousands of other hometown heroes to protect our freedom, understanding that ideals require action and sacrifice. In 1962, Sam founded Wal-Mart based on the same values he helped defend during war times; respect, quality of life, opportunity and freedom.

Today, our associates continue to serve their country and their communities. From the local to the national level, in good times and bad, they are encouraged to take the initiative when they see a need. Hundreds of reservists employed by Wal-Mart have been called to active duty this year.Wal-Mart continues their benefits, provides assistance to their families and makes up the difference between military pay and regular Wal-Mart wages.

For the last two years, Wal-Mart has sponsored National Guard units to come home from training for the holidays before they deploy overseas. To help service men and woman stay in touch with their loved ones, Wal-Mart supports the Veteran of Foreign Wars' (VFW) "Operation Uplink" by providing free phone cards so they can call home from anywhere in the world. We also provide kiosks at Wal-Mart stores where families can send free messages to their beloved soldiers.

With the help of the VFW, Wal-Mart associates and customers also send message books to troops expressing their encouragement and support. Wal-Mart also provides millions of dollars in financial aid to military family support organizations and works with suppliers to send clothing for the wounded and special need items to the troops. In times of crisis, Wal-Mart always rises to the challenge quickly and without question. We are proud to be the recipients of this high honor.

About the American Veteran Awards (AVA)
The American Veteran Awards (AVA) is America's preeminent tribute uniting arts and entertainment with the patriotic fabric of our nation - our past, present and future military and their families. AVA is an annual project of Veterans Foundation Incorporated, a 23-year old nationally recognized non-profit, non-political, non-membership 501(c)(3) organization. For more information, visit www.avashow.com.
0 Replies
 
BlueMonkey
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 02:03 pm
Women's Health is a growing concern among women 18-59, and over 60% of these women feel there is an "information overload." There is a lot of information out there, but who has time to mine through it all. For this reason, Wal-Mart is supporting Speaking of Women's Health, a nonprofit organization dedicated to educating women to make informed decisions about their health, well-being and personal safety. It is our goal to provide women with a one-stop source of health and lifestyle information. Join women across the country as Speaking of Women's Health encourages everyone to "Make Health a Habit."

What Wal-Mart is Doing.
Women across the country will be able to add health and wellness information to their shopping carts on September 19 and 20 when all local Wal-Mart stores will host a Speaking of Women's Health Community Health Event. Participants will be able to "stock up" on tips and information important to their health including a free copy of Speaking of Women's Health: The Book. An estimated 4.7 million copies of the 15-chapter paperback will be given away, courtesy of the National Speaking of Women's Health Foundation and its national sponsors.

The free books will be available on Friday, Sept. 19, and Saturday, Sept. 20, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at all Wal-Mart stores nationwide while supplies last. Packed with useful tips, advice, and information for women of all ages, the educational resource addresses a variety of women's unique health needs, from relationships and stress to osteoporosis and menopause.

In addition to the book giveaway, select Wal-Mart stores also will host various health and wellness information stations and screenings where shoppers will be able to pick up health literature and product samples.




Through our nationwide family of store associates, Wal-Mart is actively involved on a daily basis in community service projects that enhance the quality of life for families and preserve and celebrate cultural traditions.

This is why all Wal-Mart stores nationwide are celebrating Hispanic cultures, achievements and history. This year, Wal-Mart continues its annual tradition of recognizing and honoring Hispanic Americans with three separate publications. The first, which will be distributed in all stores, is a special poster titled, "A Land of Hispanic Heritage."

The map will serve as an ideal learning tool for educators and parents across the country, as it highlights Hispanic Heritage places of note, museums, cultural centers and historical information in all 50 states. The back of the poster provides even more detailed information.

The 2004 Celebraciones Calendar and Wal-Mart's 2003 Hispanic Heritage program will be distributed in more than 1,300 Wal-Mart stores and Neighborhood Markets that feature a larger Hispanic customer-base. The calendar features traditions and customs of various Latino holidays and celebrations. The program is a 32-page magazine titled "Viviendo" (Living) which includes profiles of Hispanic leaders; recipes; an original interview with Edward James Olmos, an award-winning actor; and much more. The publications will be available until October 15, or while supplies last.




Wal-Mart Thursday donated $100,000 to the Fort Campbell Army Emergency Relief fund, the largest donation ever to the organization.

The retail chain's donation is part of $800,000 given to local family support groups at 11 military installations affected by the deployment and $1 million given to national military family support groups.

Nearly 20,000 Fort Campbell soldiers were deployed to the Middle East in late February and early March.

The retail company has three Wal-Mart Supercenters and a SAM'S CLUB in Clarksville. Additionally, there is a Wal-Mart Supercenter and a Wal-Mart distribution center in Hopkinsville, Ky.

AER is the Army's emergency financial assistance organization. It provides help to soldiers and their families in times of need.

"This goes a long way in providing readiness for our soldiers," said post garrison commander Col. Kim Summers during a presentation at the Fort Campbell Boulevard Supercenter.



With over 255,000 Associates over the age of 55, Wal-Mart is no stranger to the issues that are important to seniors. To celebrate National Grandparent's Day, each Wal-Mart store awards a local youth-oriented 501(c)3 non-profit a $500 grant to carry out projects that benefit seniors. More than $800,000 was contributed to help in this special effort last year!

There are many exciting and rewarding opportunities for youth in your community who wish to participate in or create their own Grandparent's Day activities in their town. There have been many fun, creative ideas for projects that have been implemented in recent years. Programs that qualify for the Grandparent's Day grant may include (but are not limited to):


Delivering fruit baskets to nursing homes
Hosting a bingo game for senior citizens
Providing lunch for grandparents at a local food kitchen
Delivering flowers to local grandparents with families out of town
Please visit your local store before August 22 to apply. Grants are awarded on a first come, first serve basis. All Grandparent's Day grants will be presented on September 5, 2003 in conjunction with Grandparent's Day Sunday, September 7.




During times of natural disaster, the Wal-Mart Foundation, through our Wal-Mart and SAM'S CLUB locations, may provide community disaster relief funds to the local American Red Cross and / or Salvation Army chapters. Wherever there is a Wal-Mart or SAM'S CLUB location, the Wal-Mart Foundation can provide a cash donation to these organizations for immediate relief for our customers who we serve in the disaster areas. The Wal-Mart stores and SAM'S CLUB's will also assist directly by providing donations of needed supplies such as water and snacks during these times.

Overland Park SAM'S CLUB to Donate $15,000 To Assist Red Cross in Disaster Relief

Overland Park, Kan., May 9, 2003 - Overland Park SAM'S CLUB associates this week will donate $15,000 to the American Red Cross Greater Kansas City Chapter for community disaster relief. The donation will support tornado- relief efforts taking place in the Kansas City area.

"The tornado that swept through this part of Kansas and Missouri last week impacted our entire community," said John Festa, manager of the Overland Park SAM'S CLUB. "It's a wonderful feeling to know that by giving back to our community we make a difference in the lives of people in need."

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. Contributes $50,000 for Tornado Disaster Relief in Oklahoma

Bentonville, Ark., May 12, 2003 --- Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. contributed more than $50,000 in merchandise and disaster-relief funds to help the victims of tornadoes devastating cities across Oklahoma.

A truckload of merchandise - sun block, paper goods, antibacterial soap, personal care items and more - has been given by Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. and delivered by local associates to city of Moore, Okla. In addition, Wal- Mart has given cash donations totaling $50,000 to chapters of the American Red Cross, Salvation Army and the Cities of Moore and Midwest City, Okla.

"The devastating tornadoes throughout our state have challenged us to reach out even more to our neighbors in need," said William Meek, store manager for Wal-Mart. "Wal-Mart and SAM'S CLUB associates throughout the state have done a remarkable job of providing aid to their communities, and we're happy to help the Red Cross, Salvation Army and others in their efforts to get as many victims as possible back on their feet."



The Community Matching Grant Program is the largest program funded by Wal-Mart and SAM'S CLUB. The Matching Grant program allows local nonprofit organizations to hold fundraisers at their local Wal-Mart or SAM'S CLUB. Wal-Mart and SAM'S can elect to match a portion of the funds raised up to $1,000. Events held off the premesis of a Wal-Mart store or SAM'S CLUB are also eligible for funding when a Wal-Mart or SAM'S CLUB associate is actively involved in the event. Additionaly, once the Wal-Mart or SAM'S CLUB has met certain criteria in the Matching Grant Program each year, a second source of funding is awarded to the store / club to use in the community. These funds do not require a fundraiser to be held, instead the funds can be awarded directly to a deserving organization.

More than 80,000 grants, totaling $56 million, were awarded through the Community Matching Grant program last year. An additional $33 million was raised by the pariticipating community organizations who received matching funds for a combined impact of nearly $90 million through the Matching Grant program.

Organizations that may qualify to receive funding through the Matching Grant Program are 501(c)(3) non-profit organizations or organizations that are exempt from needing 501(c)(3) status, such as public schools, faith-based institutions such as churches (must be conducting a project that benefits the community at large), and government agencies.

To learn more about receiving a grant from your local Wal-Mart or SAM'S CLUB, please see the Community Involvement Coordinator at the location closest to you.
0 Replies
 
BlueMonkey
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 02:06 pm
On Saturday, May 29, 2004, the WWII Memorial will be dedicated as the first national memorial honoring all who served during World War II. This memorial is a product of years of dedicated planning. Finally, our nation will have a monument that acknowledges the commitment and achievement of the entire nation during the largest and most devastating war in history. All military veterans of the war and the citizens on the home front will be honored. This memorial, placed on the National Mall in Washington DC, will be a symbol of our national unity.

In June, 2000, on the anniversary of "the longest day", the long-overdue memorial to World War II veterans marched a step closer to reality as Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. presented a check for $14.5 million to Sen. Bob Dole, chairman of the National World War II Memorial Campaign. The contribution was presented by a group of World War II veterans and Wal-Mart associates during a special ceremony at the memorial site on the National Mall.

The donation was the largest gift toward the memorial and significantly closed the funding gap to complete the project.

"The effort behind this donation reflects what this memorial represents: millions of Americans united for a just and common cause," said Dole. "Wal-Mart and SAM'S Club associates and customers generated the largest single donation we've received. This truly has become a campaign across America, for America."

Why did Wal-Mart raise funds for the WWII Memorial?
Wal-Mart has a unique ability to mobilize our associates when it involves an issue they are passionate about. With more than 1,900 current associates who are WWII veterans, Wal-Mart and SAM'S Club recognize how important this memorial is to them and to the communities we serve.

Our associates recognize that this memorial not only salutes the men and women who fought in the war and directly participated in related efforts here at home; it also symbolizes the unity shown by the entire nation in support of this important event in our history and making our country what it is today.

The WWII Registry
At a time when fewer than one in ten adults recognize that 16 million Americans served in uniform during the Second World War, the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) introduced a World War II Registry online to document the names of those who participated in history's largest and most devastating war. The Registry is accessible on the web site of the National World War II Memorial (www.wwiimemorial.com). Any American that served in the armed forces or contributed to the war effort on the home front, whether in factories and shipyards or farms and neighborhoods, is eligible.

There is no charge to place a name in the Registry. Individuals can be enrolled through the web site or by calling the memorial's toll free number at 1-800-639- 4WW2.
0 Replies
 
Dartagnan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 02:09 pm
Thanks for sharing WalMart corporate PR, BlueMonkey. They certainly use their profits to buff their image, no question.

Your repeated explanations for everything they do--including locking workers in overnight--suggests you may do PR for them. Could that possibly be the case? Though gloating that an employee crushed his ankle suggests that you're not--they wouldn't be that clumsy. You're just an over-eager consumer of cheap merchandise.
0 Replies
 
BlueMonkey
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 02:11 pm
[www.CapitalismMagazine.com] "Is Wal-Mart Good for America?"

That is the headline on a New York Times story about the country's largest retailer. The very idea that third parties should be deciding whether a particular business is good for the whole country shows incredible chutzpa.

The people who shop at Wal-Mart can decide whether that is good for them or not. But the intelligentsia are worried about something called Wal-Mart's "market power."

Apparently this giant chain sells 30 percent of all the disposable diapers in the country and the Times reporter refers to the prospect of "Wal-Mart amassing even more market power."

Just what "power" does a sales percentage represent? Not one of the people who bought their disposable diapers at Wal-Mart was forced to do so. I can't remember ever having bought anything from Wal-Mart and there is not the slightest thing that they can do to make me.

The misleading use of words constitutes a large part of what is called anti-trust law. "Market power" is just one of those misleading terms. In anti-trust lingo, a company that sells 30 percent of the disposable diapers is said to "control" 30 percent of the market for that product. But they control nothing.

Let them jack up their prices and they will find themselves lucky to sell 3 percent of the disposable diapers. They will discover that they are just as disposable as their diapers.

Much is made of the fact that Wal-Mart has 3,000 stores in the United States and is planning to add 1,000 more. At one time, the A & P grocery chain had 15,000 stores but now they have shrunk so drastically that there are probably millions of people -- especially in the younger generation -- who don't even know that they exist.

An anti-trust lawsuit back in the 1940s claimed that A & P "controlled" a large share of the market for groceries. But they controlled nothing. As the society around them changed in the 1950s, A & P began losing millions of dollars a year, being forced to close thousands of stores and become a shadow of its former self.

Let the people who run Wal-Mart start believing the talk about how they "control" the market and, a few years down the road, people will be saying "Wal-Who?"

With Wal-Mart, as with A & P before them, the big bugaboo is that their low prices put competing stores out of business. Could anyone ever have doubted that low-cost stores win customers away from higher-cost stores?

It is one of the painful signs of the immaturity and lack of realism among the intelligentsia that many of them regard this as a "problem" to be "solved." Trade-offs have been with us ever since the late unpleasantness in the Garden of Eden.

How could industries have found all the millions of workers required to create the vast increase in output that raised American standards of living over the past hundred years, except by taking them away from the farms?

Historians have lamented the plight of the hand-loom weavers after power looms began replacing them in England. But how could the poor have been able to afford to buy adequate new clothing unless the price was brought down to their income level by mass production machinery?

Judge Robert Bork once said that somebody always gets hurt in a court room. Somebody always gets hurt in an economy that is growing. You can't keep on doing things the old way and still get the benefits of the new way.

This is not rocket science. But apparently some people just refuse to accept its logical implications. Unfortunately, some of those people are in Congress or in courtrooms practicing anti-trust law. And then there are the intelligentsia, perpetuating the mushy mindset that enables this counterproductive farce to go on.

This refusal to accept the fact that benefits have costs is especially prevalent in discussions of international trade. President Bush's ill-advised tariff on foreign steel was a classic example of trying to "save jobs" in one industry by policies which cost far more jobs in other industries making products with artificially expensive steel. Fortunately, he reversed himself.

Is it still news that there is no free lunch?
0 Replies
 
BlueMonkey
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 02:17 pm
D'artagnan,

They usually tell how someone crushes their ankle if it isn't their fault. And the truth is always left out when it is. That article did not explaine why it got crushed. It is aparent it was his fault. Why should I feel sorry for him if it was his fault. If he had opperated or took the proper safty percautions there would not have been a problem in the first place, correct? It is also not news worthy. People hurt themselves all the time I don't read about.

It is funny how the bad is illuminated but when the good comes into play it means nothing. But since that is the way hateful people operate I should not be suprised.

There isn't one person in here who can't say they never done something that was wrong. Stole a candy bar at one of those Mom and Pop stores. Stole a candy bar from Wal-Mart, speed, hit someone, slandered someone, spit in someone's food, hit someone's car in the middle of the night and not leave a note. It is like Wal-Mart has to be an angel to get on your good side. And not even one person in here is an angel. Not even close. It is the fact that they were big. If it was a small comapny that was doing okay and they had sweat shops no one cares. But low and behold a big one does it and it is a crime. Yawn. Fight another fight - this one is boring.

Devils Advocate. Fun.
0 Replies
 
Dartagnan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Jan, 2004 05:17 pm
BlueMonkey wrote:
D'artagnan,

They usually tell how someone crushes their ankle if it isn't their fault. And the truth is always left out when it is. That article did not explaine why it got crushed. It is aparent it was his fault.


You're a savvy news reader, Blue Monkey, that's obvious. There's no fooling you, nosirree. I've known quite a few journalists over the years--if all readers were as smart as you, they'd all be out of work!
0 Replies
 
 

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