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How many books do you own; how do you shelve them?

 
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Sep, 2010 01:09 pm
@dyslexia,
Quote:
you've made your point beth so whatever I might say in the future should probably be ignored.


Not true at all, Dys. I guess, by your reckonin', you were a hypocrite, aren't we all on some issues, before you wrote this;

Quote:
is that I've seen a trend among people I know to amass various "stuff" often in the vein of conspicuous consumption. over the years I have become an advocate for simplifying, not only in an ecological sense but beyond that to valuing quality of living vs quantifying life. ie american families have consistently become smaller yet over the past 25 years the average square feet of american homes has doubled in size. This quantifying of life, does not, in my opinion, result in improving quality or happiness and may very well have the opposite effect. according the the threads I read here and what news I read the masses are dissatisfied with current education, food quality, manufactured junk, t.v. junk, the list is endless. I shall continue to voice my small opinion as long as I can full well knowing no "enlightenment" is on the horizon. I do not offer answers but I sure would enjoy more people asking themselves questions.



but it sure was spot on! Well said, especially about the houses.

0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Sep, 2010 03:41 pm
well, reading back through this thread has been a kick in the pants for sure, I may very well have learned more about some posters rational/analytical processes (including my own) than I care to know. I'm pretty sure that's a good thing.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Sep, 2010 03:46 pm
I have decided to put my books on microfilm and hide them in a boot.
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Sep, 2010 03:54 pm
@edgarblythe,
good thinking Laughing I didn't know microfilm still existed as storage mechanism.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Sep, 2010 03:55 pm
@dyslexia,
Problems. Always problems.
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Sun 19 Sep, 2010 05:33 pm
@edgarblythe,

To paraphrase a well known American philosopher:
Quote:
He got 99 problems but a book ain't one.
0 Replies
 
Diane
 
  2  
Reply Sun 19 Sep, 2010 06:56 pm


For people with a poor self-image, who are neurotic and have an

inferiority complex, (which could describe me pretty well),I think that

anything they can find to help them get through every day, day by day,

shouldn't be denigrated.

In fact, neuroticism is no longer in the Diagnostic and Statistical

Manual of Mental Disorders; taken out because it was agreed that

everyone is neurotic to some degree.

I wonder how many people on a2k would admit to having a poor self-image

or an inferiority complex, if they could do so in private? I'll bet

that many would do so openly.

If a person with an inferiority complex wants to impress with their

interior decorating skill, or their vast libraries of leather-bound

classics, why not let them take some comfort that outer appearance will

compensate for a lack of inner confidence and real learning? They are

easily found out anyway.

Even those rare creatures with superior intelligence and great

personalities filled with confidence, enjoy showing off their

superiority.

So many words I've used, all to say that we need our comforts, no

matter how silly or misleading they are. The fact that one's lack of

self-confidence is so easily spotted by the show of "impressive"

objects, just means they could use a little kindness and a

good dose of reality without condemnation.

djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Sep, 2010 07:04 pm
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

I have decided to put my books on microfilm and hide them in a boot.


a good book can be used to shore up the leg on a wobbly table, i'd like to see you do that with microfilm

actually i'd probably use a bad book to accomplish said task, maybe a harlequin romance
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Sep, 2010 07:06 pm
@djjd62,
I give away my unused books to the local book burners society.
0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  2  
Reply Mon 20 Sep, 2010 01:23 am
@Diane,
Quote:
So many words I've used, all to say that we need our comforts, no

matter how silly or misleading they are. The fact that one's lack of

self-confidence is so easily spotted by the show of "impressive"

objects, just means they could use a little kindness and a

good dose of reality without condemnation.


Diane, this is not directed at you, but what you posted here sparked my thoughts and helped me come to some cohesive thought about what was bothering me about several assumptions voiced by other people in this thread. So please don't take my questions personally as if they're directed at you - they're not.
They're directed to the community.

Because I'm having trouble wrapping my brain around:
a) how having a lot of books necessarily equates with unneccessarily big houses and conspicuous consumption, which is a pet peeve of mine too.
Because in truth, I have to say it's been my experience that the 3,000 square foot houses or 'mcmansions' that house a family of four that I've been in are not usually crammed with books.
As a rule, I'd say they're almost empty - just vast expanses of hardwood floors, cold ceramic tile and gleaming granite and metal surfaces in the kitchen. You could almost assume you were looking at a model home - it's as if the type of people who want to live with that much space between them don't want to do anything or have anything to clutter the space and make it look lived in- although they might have an artificial ficus or two standing sentry next to the french doors that lead from their kitchen out onto the gargantuan deck that leads out onto their gargantuan yard.

Maybe it's just my own 'prejudice' but it seems to me that people who care about 'show' don't usually care about books. And their walls and carpets are usually neutral.

On the other hand, the houses I've been in where it's obvious books and reading are a priority are most often slightly cramped for space because books line every wall and every surface. I just visited a house like that last weekend. It was amazing. I mean every wall of every room was lined with books. I asked this guy about Dover Castle and he went to the shelf and found a book for me to look at that told me all about it. I asked him about where Thomas a Becket was martyred and he went unerringly to the right spot on the right shelf without a moment's hesitation and pulled a book down about it for me to look at.

b) Why do people automatically assume an obvious love of or interest in something has to be a pretension that indicates low self-esteem?
That would be my last thought. If I saw a house with a lot of books, I'd think those people like to read. If I saw a house with a lot of cars, I'd think those people like cars. If I saw a house with a swimming pool, I'd think those people like to swim.
I hope people don't see my shelves filled with cd's and think, 'Oh she doesn't really like music - she just wants everyone to THINK she likes music.
What the hell?
I think anyone who automatically thinks that sort of **** is the insecure one.
And those are the people I think might need a dose of kindness because kindness is never bad.

But oh lord, if people are walking around and looking at the signs of what a person is interested in and love and thinking 'utter pretension and ostentation' and almost especially about something like BOOKS in a house - goodness me- I don't know what to think.

saab
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Sep, 2010 02:45 am
@aidan,
I can only agree with you Aidan.
If I see books in a home, I take for granted that these people are interested in books.
If they are leatherbound or hardcover I donĀ“t see it as bragging, but they like books they read a lot in leather or hardcover. I have several myself, but several of them my aunt has done as she could and did bind books in leather. Others are old and handed down for some generations.
If you have cds I take for granted you like music.
If a person has beautiful teacups, it is probably because tea tastes better in a thin teacup and also the pleasure of having beautiful things around.
Having nothing special around can also be a show off. A person wants to tell the rest of us that they are above collecting things.
I know a woman whose interests are theatre, concerts and art exhibitions.
She loves to tell me about her "cultural interests", but in her home there is nothing to show it - no books, no antics, no specially beautiful paintings - it is nice but a very plain home.
0 Replies
 
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Oct, 2010 02:16 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
I just added Bob Woodwards new book Obama's Wars to my library. Anyone else read it already? I'm only into the first chapter. If I got off of A2K I could have read more by now.

BBB
0 Replies
 
 

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