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Calling all bakers: glass/ceramic pan v. metal pan?

 
 
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 06:25 pm
I want to make this certain cake for a block party this weekend. The recipe says to bake it in a glass or ceramic pan (and I always have) but this time I want to double the recipe and make it in a bigger pan and I only have a metal one.

The cake is a gooey chocolate upside down (hot fudgy on the bottom, brownieish on the top) cake so the texture and consistency is really important to it's success.

Typically the cake is cooked in an 8x8 pyrex pan at 325 for about 45 minutes

A variation calls for cooking the cake in 6-8 oz ramekins for 20 minutes at 400.

I need to cook it in a 8.5 x 12.5 metal pan or a 12 x 17 metal pan.

I'm thinking -- the smaller metal pan, at 300, for about an hour.

What do you think?

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Type: Question • Score: 4 • Views: 8,854 • Replies: 18
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farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 06:26 pm
@boomerang,
go to AMericas Test Kitchen. They always do some good science about cooking.

Ill stay tuned, cause I have no advice here. I got nothin.
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 06:31 pm
@farmerman,
I got the recipe from their cookbook!
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 06:35 pm
@boomerang,
WHich one, we have most of em. I love these guys. They play with cooking like a chemistry set.
Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 06:46 pm
@boomerang,
Generally you need to lower the temperature (-25 deg. F) when baking in glass. In your recipe you'd bake at 350 F, unless your metal pan is dark. Dark metal will heat up faster so you would use the same temperature as glass.
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 06:47 pm
@farmerman,
It's the "10th Anniversary, Best Recipes" issue.

I usually don't buy cookbooks but this one is the bomb!
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 06:50 pm
@Swimpy,
Brilliant! Thank you!

I haven't "seen" you in ages and ages. I hope all is well.
Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 06:51 pm
@boomerang,
I'm usually here once a day, but seldom post. It's good to see you too. Now how about that recipe?
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 06:57 pm
@Swimpy,
Here you go! This cake looks pretty awful but tastes divine. It's a really goofy recipe; you make a brownie type batter, sprinkle dry ingredients on top, cover it with water and bake. I don't really like chocolate but even I'll indulge in a spoonful or two:



Quote:
Hot Fudge Pudding Cake
(Recipe from America's Test Kitchen

Serves 8

If you have cold, brewed coffee on hand, it can be used in place of the instant coffee and water, but to make sure it isn’t too strong, use 1 cup of cold coffee mixed with 1/2 cup of water. Serve the cake warm with vanilla or coffee ice cream. Leftovers can be reheated, covered with plastic wrap, in a microwave oven.

2 teaspoons instant coffee
1½ cups water
2/3 cup (2½ ounces) Dutch-processed cocoa
1/3 cup packed (1¾ ounces) brown sugar
1 cup (7 ounces) granulated sugar
6 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 ounces bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, chopped
¾ cup (3¾ ounces) unbleached all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
1/3 cup whole milk
¼ teaspoon salt
1 large egg yolk

1. Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 325 degrees. Lightly spray 8-inch square glass or ceramic baking dish with nonstick cooking spray (see illustration on page 321). Stir instant coffee into water; set aside to dissolve. Stir together 1/3 cup cocoa, brown sugar, and 1/3 cup granulated sugar in small bowl, breaking up large clumps with fingers; set aside. Melt butter, remaining 1/3 cup cocoa, and chocolate in small bowl set over saucepan of barely simmering water; whisk until smooth and set aside to cool slightly. Whisk flour and baking powder in small bowl to combine; set aside. Whisk remaining 2/3 cup sugar, vanilla, milk, and salt in medium bowl until combined; whisk in yolk. Add chocolate mixture and whisk to combine. Add flour mixture and whisk until batter is evenly moistened.

2. Pour batter into prepared baking dish and spread evenly to sides and corners. Sprinkle cocoa/sugar mixture evenly over batter (cocoa mixture should cover entire surface of batter); pour coffee mixture gently over cocoa mixture. Bake until cake is puffed and bubbling and just beginning to pull away from sides of baking dish, about 45 minutes. (Do not overbake.) Cool cake in dish on wire rack about 25 minutes before serving.

Variation
Individual Hot Fudge Pudding Cakes
Follow recipe for Hot Fudge Pudding Cake, heating oven to 400 degrees and lightly spraying eight 6- to 8-ounce ramekins with nonstick cooking spray; set ramekins on baking sheet. Divide batter evenly among ramekins (about ¼ cup per ramekin) and level with back of spoon; sprinkle about 2 tablespoons cocoa/sugar mixture over batter in each ramekin. Pour 3 tablespoons coffee mixture over cocoa/sugar mixture in each ramekin. Bake until puffed and bubbling, about 20 minutes. (Do not overbake.) Cool ramekins about 15 minutes before serving (cakes will fall).
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 07:00 pm
@boomerang,
Is it their Hot Fudge Pudding Cake? I always use a square Pyrex -- 8 x 8. If you double the recipe and make it in a metal pan, you'd have to increase the temp, right?
Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 07:01 pm
@boomerang,
Sounds interesting. I'll have to give it a try sometime. Thanks!
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 07:08 pm
@Irishk,
Yes, that's what they call it! What a yummy cake. I think it will be perfect for a buffet type party.

And it sounds like I will have to increase the temp.

Now -- should I use the big pan or the little pan? Now I'm kinda thinking that the bigger pan would keep the cake at the same thickness.....

I just don't want the center to be squishy.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 07:13 pm
@boomerang,
See if this info from my favorite baking website answers your question:

http://www.baking911.com/pantry/substitutes_pansizes.htm

There is a chart near the bottom of the page that gives pan size conversion data.

Regarding the material of the pan, she gives this advice:

Quote:
Pan Size and Estimated Baking Time in a 350 degree F Oven: There really isn't a baking formula for time to bake... that's why one usually gives a range in a recipe and the baker her/himself needs to determine the final end point. Be sure to use the visual indicators to test for the proper doneness. If you select a glass bakeware dish or a dark, non-stick pan, reduce the oven temperature by 25 degrees F.



Here's her advice on doubling and tripling a recipe:

http://www.baking911.com/howto/recipes_doubletriplecut.htm

Oddly, on that page about doubling a recipe, she gives this opposing advice about pans, oven temperature and baking times:

Quote:
NOTE: If you choose to scale a cake recipe, in general, I don't recommend adjusting the oven temperature, unless you are prepared to throw out a lot of recipes. Some baker's claim you should reduce the oven temperature when baking the recipe in a larger pan. In general, I won't recommend it because it is a fairly complex decision, based upon a lot of variables, and is not something I recommend as a blanket "yes!" on my website. In general, the larger the surface area that's exposed to the heat, the faster the cake will bake. In discussing this with Shirley Corriher, baking911.com's Advisor, she agrees with me. To paraphrase her: It depends on the new surface area and the size and thickness of the new pan, as well as the material. And, the decision to adjust baking temperatures is a complex one. Also, in Rose Levy Beranbaum's book, The Cake Bible, she does NOT recommend adjusting the oven heat as the pan size increases. Her charts show that the baking time will increase, as do I.

In general, if the new cake's surface is exposed to more oven heat than before, watch the cake during baking and if it starts to bake unevenly and brown quickly at the edges, reduce the oven temperature by 25 degrees F. If the cake is deeper than before, meaning you're using a deeper pan, then you may need to use a heating core to get the middle to bake better, but don't change the oven's temperature. (6-19-05)
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 07:43 pm
@Butrflynet,
Thanks Butrflynet!
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 08:10 pm
@boomerang,
Based on that last bit of info, I'd probably double the recipe, use the 8.5 x 12.5 metal pan, set the oven temp to a bit over 325 and check for doneness at 45 min. Then continue to check at 5 min. intervals.
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 09:51 pm
That is a cake I have made for years and years. My recipes come either from a Williams-Sonoma cake book (where it is called Denver Fudge Cake) or from the Woman's Day Encyclopedia. The two recipes differ a little but I never thought one was better than the other. As I read my cookbooks sometimes to help me sleep, it is a matter of which one I can find when I want to make that dessert, which is a winter time fav.

I always baked mine in a square stainless steel pan that I used to use for brownies.
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 09:57 pm
BTW, I bake pies exclusively in ceramic but I use metal pans for cakes, not that I bake many cakes.
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 10:06 pm
@plainoldme,
I have 2 heavy 10" glass pie pans that I just love. I hardly ever make layer cakes -- usually I'll make a sheet cake and use a large Pyrex casserole type dish. I have a ton of those for some reason. Love the way things brown when they're baked in glass.
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2010 10:37 pm
@Irishk,
I don't make cakes often because my family is lukewarm toward them. I do have a pair of 8, 9 and 10" cake pans and several bundt style pans.

My family likes pies and cheesecake.
0 Replies
 
 

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