11
   

Sounds We Don't Hear Anymore

 
 
Eorl
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Aug, 2010 06:57 pm
The wicked swish of kids getting caned at school.
Remember that sound a little too well.
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Aug, 2010 07:11 pm
'Newsworld' playing on the tv to a Hovis ad.

Rag and bone men.

Park dusk-bells.

The loadup screech of a commodore 64 tapedeck.

The national anthem at the end of the day's tv broadcast.

The test-card beeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee...........p.

0 Replies
 
Eorl
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Aug, 2010 07:42 pm
Winding of stuck cassette with a pencil.

Leader tape hiss.
0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  2  
Reply Mon 16 Aug, 2010 07:44 pm
ka-thunk ssss ka-thunk ssss ka-thunk ssss ka-thunk ssss ka-thunk ssss ka-thunk ssss ka-thunk ssss ka-thunk ssss ka-thunk ssss ka-thunk ssss ka-thunk ssss

Then you get up and lift the tone arm off the centre of the vinyl.
Eorl
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Aug, 2010 07:49 pm
@hingehead,
Taking the plastic off a nice new TDK SA90

The crinkle of the LP's anti-static sleeve.
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Aug, 2010 07:58 pm
@Eorl,
You could afford SA90s? I was strictly an AD90 boy.

Paper boys whistles on Sunday mornings.
Pemerson
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Aug, 2010 07:58 pm
@Roberta,
Nice thread, brings back some nice memories.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Aug, 2010 08:10 pm
I always liked the Helm's truck, and the Good Humor man, as a kid. And street vendors and their carts.

The Helm's truck of my childhood died long ago, and the ice cream truck guy in my neighborhood now has been taken as at the least a sloppy driver, though I personally have not observed him at it; I'm on the side of the other guy, from various reports.

Now I think of the ice cream truck as a clown rattling piercing objects... oh, wait, maybe not the dreamsicle I envision.


With luck, that is just my present view.

Where the hell are the paletas carts?
0 Replies
 
Intrepid
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Aug, 2010 08:20 pm
The sound of the bell ringing by the knife/scissor sharpener walking down the street. And, the buzz of the foot operated wheel that he used to sharpen them.

The sheeney man in his horse and wagon calling out. Some called them the rag man.

The clip clop of the milk truck and bread truck horses as they made their daily rounds.

The air raid sirens of the 50's.

The sound of coke bottle caps falling into the tray when you opened them.

The sound of the strap on the hands delivered by the school principal. (I was never the recipient)

The chugging of steam engines.
Eorl
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Aug, 2010 08:36 pm
@hingehead,
hingehead wrote:

You could afford SA90s? I was strictly an AD90 boy.

Paper boys whistles on Sunday mornings.


Get that awful non-chrome abomination away from me! So much hiss you'd have to use dolby noise reduction, and that just made you think you had industrial deafness due to the loss of treble!

Complex click of the auto-reverse mechanism, during auto-dubbing.
0 Replies
 
Eorl
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Aug, 2010 08:41 pm
The rattle of the old diesel train, sleeping on the floor between seats during my 24 hour train trip home from boarding school on school holidays.
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Aug, 2010 09:46 pm
@Eorl,
Volkswagen beetle engines.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Aug, 2010 10:16 pm
@Intrepid,
Intrepid wrote:


The sheeney man in his horse and wagon calling out. Some called them the rag man.



Am I reading this right? Trying to remain calm.

Remembering the ice cream trucks. And a dozen kids shouting up to their mothers, "Hey, ma. Throw me down a nickel."
Intrepid
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Aug, 2010 10:20 pm
@Roberta,
Not sure if you are reading it right. What/how are you reading it? Confused
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Aug, 2010 10:43 pm
@Intrepid,
Intrepid wrote:

Not sure if you are reading it right. What/how are you reading it? Confused


According the google (and me), sheeny is a contemptuous term for a Jew. The equivalent of kike.
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 Aug, 2010 10:50 pm
Yeah, Roberta, I kinda wondered about that too, but it allegedly was a Detroit-area localism, and had no ethnic connotations. I grew up near Detroit and don't remember the term, tho we had other localisms there--I remember kids at Halloween going door to door and calling out "help the poor" instead of "trick or treat"--we went "begging" , not "trick or treating"--and it seems that call has died out around Detroit now too.

Here's a discussion of "sheeny man":
http://historymike.blogspot.com/2009/05/on-garbage-picking-sheeny-man-and.html

Quote:
While visiting with my grandparents the other day, my grandfather mentioned an expression I had not heard in some time: "the sheeny man." Originally "sheeny" was an ethnic slur used to describe immigrant Jews, but in the Detroit area "the sheeny man" referred to anyone who patrolled the alleys looking for value in the trash of residents.

In other words, a "garbage picker," though these days such people are more likely to be referred to as urban foragers, curb shoppers, or recycling entrepreneurs.

In Detroit during the 1960s and 1970s, the sheeny man was just as likely to be black as white, and this was one of those expressions passed from generation to generation that lost its ethnic connotations. While being called a "sheeny man" was certainly less glamorous than being called a "rock star" or "MLB starting pitcher," in the blue-collar Detroit neighborhoods in which I grew up "sheeny man" was just a work-oriented moniker, nothing more.

I recently remarked on another blog that I have spent almost the entirety of my life (with the exception of vacations and a brief stint living in Dallas) in the middle of the American Rust Belt in cities like Toledo and Detroit. I do not know if urban foraging is as prevalent in wealthier cities, but it is clear that plenty of people in decaying Midwestern cities derive a significant portion of their incomes by sifting through the trash of others.

What I find especially interesting is the rapidity with which items I discard get snapped up by folks driving through the neighborhoods. At times I scarcely return to my house before a rumbling old pickup appears to take away an item I place at the street, hauling away material that I considered trash but which has value to another person.

Of course, I am not immune to the lure of someone else's unwanted materials, and over the years I have procured from the trash objects that still possessed value and utility. These ranged from bikes to lawnmowers to snowblowers, though my wife will argue that much of the "wealth" I brought home merely collected dust until a yard sale or an inevitable garage-cleaning.

So pick away, ye dumpster divers and refuse gleaners: our landfills are less full and our garages are less cluttered for your efforts.


Everybody in Cambridge seems to fit that description. Stuff left out for trash disappears quick--impoverished students furnish whole apartments that way--backyards have the patio furniture someone else threw away, and of course the homeless deposit bottle pickers who support themselves by 2am foraging.
0 Replies
 
Intrepid
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Aug, 2010 12:18 am
@Roberta,
Roberta wrote:

Intrepid wrote:

Not sure if you are reading it right. What/how are you reading it? Confused


According the google (and me), sheeny is a contemptuous term for a Jew. The equivalent of kike.


I certainly meant no disrespect with the term. All I know is that is what they were called and we never used it in what we considered a derogatory way. As far as we knew, and I believe it is still so, the meaning was a junk man. This was in Toronto in the 50's.
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Aug, 2010 12:33 am
@Intrepid,
Intrepid wrote:

Roberta wrote:

Intrepid wrote:

Not sure if you are reading it right. What/how are you reading it? Confused


According the google (and me), sheeny is a contemptuous term for a Jew. The equivalent of kike.


I certainly meant no disrespect with the term. All I know is that is what they were called and we never used it in what we considered a derogatory way. As far as we knew, and I believe it is still so, the meaning was a junk man. This was in Toronto in the 50's.


Intrepid, I had a feeling that the answer would be something like that. Still I got a bit of a start when I saw that word. I suspect that the expression didn't start out with the innocence it now seems to carry.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Aug, 2010 04:47 am
Wind-up alarm clocks with a bell alarm that could wake the dead.

0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Aug, 2010 11:24 am
Someone telling another to dial "Popcorn" to check what time it is.

The chipping away of freezer ice build up with an ice pick.

Live pipe organ music at the local pizza parlor.

A gas station attendant volunteering to check under the hood for you.

The brrrng brrrng of the bell on a tot's tricycle.

The rat-a-tat-tat-tat-tat of the ticker tape as it feeds through a telegraph machine.

 

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