7
   

VERY Good philosophy educating books

 
 
luburium
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Aug, 2010 01:20 am
@Jebediah,
Of course, that's why I am asking for books nothing else here, Also Medical research was first made by monks by using different plants to treat Headaches and such, but I suppose Voodoo men from tribal groups used it first to stop bleeding and such things.
0 Replies
 
luburium
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Aug, 2010 01:22 am
@55hikky,
Yeah, well I like an argument just not when you're actually trying to get some tips lol.
existential potential
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Aug, 2010 01:45 am
@luburium,
if you've been studying the subject for four years, why do you need an introductory book on the subject? anyway, Nigel Warburton's book "Philosophy the basics" is a good start. surely you've read more complex texts in fours years of study though, or maybe not?
existential potential
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Aug, 2010 01:52 am
@luburium,
philosophy isn't simply about creating your own wat of thinking, a lot if it is about looking at how past philosophers thought, and learning to think critically about things.
HexHammer
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 5 Aug, 2010 04:40 am
@luburium,
For some reason I get the idea that your severly bordeline.
luburium
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Aug, 2010 04:50 am
@existential potential,
You do not necessarily have to look into the past to seek your answers cause it's like asking a computer engineer to Google your computer problem, I did explain what Philosophy means earlier as well and I stick to that definition.
0 Replies
 
luburium
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Aug, 2010 04:53 am
@existential potential,
Nope, I studied Philosophy in my own definition of what Philosophy was, I would like to right now spend time learning Philosophy by previous Philosophers and Books. Oh and btw I've done Psychology by the book which I thought co-harmonized with Philosophy since it's all about understanding.
luburium
 
  4  
Reply Thu 5 Aug, 2010 04:53 am
@HexHammer,
For some reason I feel that you're just a bitter old man whom cannot seem to know how to use a forum and stay on topic.
HexHammer
 
  -2  
Reply Thu 5 Aug, 2010 05:03 am
@luburium,
luburium wrote:

For some reason I feel that you're just a bitter old man whom cannot seem to know how to use a forum and stay on topic.
I have to make that conclusions because you never answer any of my questions, but instead make farfetched claims, very simple.
0 Replies
 
jgweed
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Aug, 2010 09:05 am
The philosophical tradition, beginning with Thales of Miletus (around 600 BC) up to Heidegger (died 1976) is long and as vastly complex as the civilisation which grew out of it; moreover, it takes as its subject matter everything. The study of Philosophy then, is a very complex and lengthy project.

In several discussion threads about studying philosophy, Bertrand Russell's History of Western Philosophy seems highly regarded (and rightly so) as a good introduction to the history of philosophy and its important thinkers, despite some decided opinions expressed from time to time by the author, a philosopher of distinction in his own right.

Now one reads philosophers to gain different perspectives on many subjects that one might not have considered on one's own and to improve one's critical thinking by examples; having a grasp of their historical importance can lead to further reading of the philosopher's own words. Luckily, the original works of many of the great philosophers can be found, in the original language or in translation, online; many sites, moreover, are devoted to the discussion of either a philosopher or a school of thought.

In addition to these on-line sources, one should mention above all else, the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy and also the Dictionary of Philosophical Terms and Names found on the Philosophy Pages website. There are moreover, many sites the treat logic and logical fallacies (for example, Fallacyfiles).
0 Replies
 
kennethamy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Aug, 2010 10:33 am
@luburium,
luburium wrote:

I might say I'm fairly good at my philosophy and all but I have only been scratching the surface of it for about 4 years, I would like to spend a lot more time on the subject and I was wondering if you could help me with any great books or sites regarding topic.


A book much better than indicated by its title is, An Introduction to Western Philosophy by Anthony Flew. It is really an introduction to philosophizing about western philosophy.
0 Replies
 
55hikky
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 3 Sep, 2010 09:14 pm
@luburium,
well, it is just a little bit funny that you start off asking for books, and claim that you are a good philosopher, yet a few of your later posts sort of promote how philosophers don't need to read to be great philosophers...
0 Replies
 
55hikky
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Sep, 2010 09:17 pm
@luburium,
isn't every study about, or every thinking, about understanding..?

is there a thinking where the outcome is not understanding something more about that subject?
0 Replies
 
Holiday20310401
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Sep, 2010 11:46 pm
@luburium,
For philosophy books I would recommend narrowing it down for starters, or at least, finding a book which helps you do so. Good ones have already been mentioned. After that it really does depend on what you're interested in more specifically. You'd know better than I what philosophical psychology there is out there. I know I enjoyed reading Maslow's "Farther Reaches of Human Nature" and Csíkszentmihályi's "Optimal Experiences". I can let you know of some other good reads in philosophy provided I know what you want other than to know the views of other philosophers. I'm actually about to start a major in psychology, and I was wondering, because it sounds like you've been reading in this field, what books are must reads.

Also, one of the more important reasons I read philosophy is -aside from gaining perspective- understanding where a philosopher's perspective came from. For that reason I am very picky, and find a lot of the writing done in philosophy books hard to stand, because though it is easy (or at least possible anyways) to see and capture the writer's reasoning and then to see what is absent in it or prejudiced about it, it is difficult to extend this process beyond the scope of the writers reasoning. One can understand what intuitions are present and not present in the writer, but not often what experiences and emotions specifically led to that intuition - let alone the hardening of that intuition. Yes I want to know where the groundwork came from for a philosopher's reasoning, but I also want to know on what ground that groundwork establishes itself. It's probably for this reason that I can't help but reject the idea of only suggesting to you to only read philosophy books. Read literature too, lol.
0 Replies
 
 

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