8
   

Happy Fiftieth Birthday To Kill A Mockingbird!

 
 
Reply Sun 6 Jun, 2010 07:18 pm
Quote:
“To Kill a Mockingbird” turns 50 this year, and all over the country Americans are turning out to reread and honor the story of Atticus Finch, Scout, Boo Radley, Tom Robinson " and race and justice in the pre-Civil Rights era South.

“To Kill a Mockingbird” was a bestseller and a Pulitzer Prize winner in its day.

The movie, with Gregory Peck, was a national event. The book’s author, Harper Lee, is still alive " though she hasn’t spoken publically in years. And the book itself " the story " sells on and on, and still moves.

This Hour, On Point: “To Kill a Mockingbird” at fifty.

http://www.onpointradio.org/2010/06/to-kill-a-mockingbird

I might attend this author reading:
Quote:
Writers on Writers: Harper Lee & To Kill a MockingbirdWhen: Monday, June 14, 2010
7:00PM - 11:00PM Where: Barnes and Noble
150 East 86th Street, New York, New York
Mary Murphy, author of Scout, Atticus and Boo and Wally Lamb discuss Harper Lee and her classic To Kill A Mockingbird as part of the Barnes and Noble Writers on Writers series.

http://tokillamockingbird50year.com/event/117048971667080
http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=117048971667080
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 8 • Views: 1,641 • Replies: 17
No top replies

 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Jun, 2010 07:51 pm
For many years I thought that novel was older than that. By the time I knew about it, it was already a classic.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Jun, 2010 08:05 pm
@tsarstepan,
Love dat book. Love dat film.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Jun, 2010 08:13 pm
@dlowan,
It's one of the really rare books being assigned during my high school career I loved. I hated 19 out of 20 books assigned to me back then. The only other book I can fondly remember being assigned back then was George Orwell's Animal Farm.
0 Replies
 
Ionus
 
  2  
Reply Sun 6 Jun, 2010 11:00 pm
Quote:
"To Kill a Mockingbird" was a bestseller and a Pulitzer Prize winner in its day.
I dont know why.....I caution all that if you really do have a bird problem buy a cat as the book is very scarce on the details of killing birds. Alfred Hitchcock's movie "The Birds" is far more practical.
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Mon 7 Jun, 2010 04:23 am
@Ionus,
Well everyone knows you then have to get a dog to get rid of the pesky cat and so on and so on.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  2  
Reply Mon 7 Jun, 2010 04:41 am
@tsarstepan,
I read it years ago & really enjoyed it, tsar.
I was wondering though, whether it might feel a bit dated now?
Hard to say, without reading it again.
Eorl
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Jun, 2010 05:22 am
@dlowan,
dlowan wrote:

Love dat book. Love dat film.


Same here. More than one Boo Radley hangin' out in these threads!
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Jun, 2010 06:30 am
@Eorl,
Eorl wrote:

dlowan wrote:

Love dat book. Love dat film.


Same here. More than one Boo Radley hangin' out in these threads!


Boo was ok.
dlowan
 
  2  
Reply Mon 7 Jun, 2010 06:31 am
@msolga,
msolga wrote:

I read it years ago & really enjoyed it, tsar.
I was wondering though, whether it might feel a bit dated now?
Hard to say, without reading it again.


Oddly, I re-read it just recently.

It's more of a period piece, but it's still bloody good.

It was set in the past already, so evokes another age.....well, kind of, the civil rights struggle was hotting up when it was written.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Mon 7 Jun, 2010 08:42 am
Wonderful book, wonderful movie.

I wonder what could be done with a remake?

Should be be done in the same original time period, or today?

Who would be a good picks for Atticus Finch, the father of the "molested" girl, the black man on trial, Boo Radley?

Impossible now of course, but wouldn't the late Dennis Hopper be perfect for the bigoted white trash farmer?

Omar Epps for the accused?
Christina Ricci for the white trash girl?
Johnny (stop being Tim Burtons puppet) Depp for Atticus? Or Kevin Spacey?
Spacey would be an excellent choice for Boo.
0 Replies
 
Philis
 
  2  
Reply Mon 7 Jun, 2010 06:55 pm
I watched another Greg Peck movie in which he was a great father, "The Yearling." I was like scout in many ways, I love TKAM.
0 Replies
 
Eorl
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 12:43 am
@dlowan,
'course he was! Not sayin' he weren't.

dlowan
 
  2  
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 06:03 am
@Eorl,
Eorl wrote:

'course he was! Not sayin' he weren't.




How could I have doubted you!!!??

So...who's Boo here?


Eorl
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Jun, 2010 08:02 pm
@dlowan,
Probably all of us to a greater or lesser extent.

First to mind would by my earliest impressions of OmSigDavid; vastly different to my current impression, but also quite likely vastly different to what I would see in his house.
(Hope he's not offended by that)
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Mon 12 Jul, 2010 06:04 am
@msolga,
So having never read it and it being the anniversary and all, I read it over the weekend. Rather than being dated, it's become more like historical fiction. I could feel my grandmother in the characters. The morals are just as pertinent. I really loved it. Thanks for bringing up the thread.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Jul, 2010 07:04 pm
Quote:
ROBOT CHICKEN: To Kill a Mockingbird
A student gives his report on To Kill a Mockingbird.


http://video.adultswim.com/robot-chicken/to-kill-a-mockingbird.html
Eorl
 
  1  
Reply Mon 26 Jul, 2010 07:37 pm
@tsarstepan,
can't see that outside US
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » Happy Fiftieth Birthday To Kill A Mockingbird!
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 10/16/2019 at 08:05:53