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Can I put my Broccoli and Stringbean seedling in the ground yet?

 
 
Amigo
 
Reply Sat 10 Apr, 2010 07:36 pm
I am in Ogden Utah. Will my broccoli and string beans die if I plant them outside? I am tired of taking them in and out of the garage every night to avoid the frost and they look kind of yellow.
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Type: Question • Score: 3 • Views: 1,771 • Replies: 12
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Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Apr, 2010 08:19 pm
Put the brocolli in the ground. Wait until after your last frost date for the beans?

Joe(http://www.usu.edu/ust/index.cfm?article=7395)Nation
Amigo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Apr, 2010 08:22 pm
@Joe Nation,
Thanks. My last frost is 5/24.

But now I need to try to remember what is Brocoli and what are beans, they look the same.
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Apr, 2010 08:23 pm
@Amigo,
Quote:
Cold hardy vegetables can be planted four to six weeks before the last frost date. Some of these include broccoli, cabbage, lettuce, onions, peas and spinach. These crops thrive in cool weather and should not be planted late in the spring. Pea seeds, for example, can actually germinate when soil temperatures are about 40 F, while tomato seeds germinate best when soil temperatures are above 65 F. Beets, carrots, chard, onion sets and radishes are hardy plants that can be planted two to four weeks before the last frost date.

Plants that are not cold hardy should be planted around the frost free date. These include beans, squash, corn and tomatoes. Peppers, eggplant, cucumbers and melons require hot weather to grow well and should be planted about a week after the last expected frost. These plants may be injured if planted too early and consequently may not grow or flower well throughout the rest of the season.


The last frost date for Ogden Utah is typically May 5th.

source
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Apr, 2010 08:24 pm
@Amigo,
Amigo wrote:

Thanks. My last frost is 5/24.

But now I need to try to remember what is Brocoli and what are beans, they look the same.


That's probably the latest frost date. Take a chance around 5/5. You'll be right 50% of the time.


And your broccoli leaves are probably a bit more blue-green than your beans.
Amigo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Apr, 2010 08:33 pm
@JPB,
Thank you, Thank you.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Apr, 2010 08:50 pm
@Amigo,
Beans and broccoli don't like cold feet. What are the overnight temps in the garage? If below 50, you might need to use a low-temp heating pad to keep the soil warmer; or move them indoors near a sunny window.

They also need many hours of light. You might also try leaving the lights on in the garage 24/7 so they get a lot more light.


Beans:

http://www.burpee.com/contentarticle.do?itemID=770

CULTIVATION

Beans cannot tolerate any frost, so plant after all danger of frost, waiting until the soil is somewhat warm. When beans emerge, thin to 6 inches apart.

Broccoli:

http://images.parkseed.com/parksgardens/pem001980/kbyg5pem001980tb.html

Sow your Broccoli and Cauliflower seeds at a depth of 4 times the size of the seed, or ½ inch deep, and water thoroughly. Once the seeds have sprouted, be sure to keep the soil lightly moist.

Make sure the plants receive plenty of light " fluorescent light for around 14 to 16 hours a day is also ideal for the fastest growth. You will want to keep the seedlings just a few inches below the light so they don't "stretch" and get "leggy". If you don't have fluorescent lighting, a south-facing window will do just fine.

Transplant your Broccoli and Cauliflower seedlings when they have at least two sets of true leaves. This should be done about 2 weeks before the last frost. Site them in full sun in a rich, moist, well-drained soil, spacing the young plants 18 to 24 inches apart in rows that are 2 ½ to 3 feet apart. Feed both your Broccoli and Cauliflower with a low nitrogen fertilizer when first planting out. For your Broccoli, fertilize again when the plants are 6 to 8 inches tall, 12 to 15 inches tall, and then when the buds first form. For your Cauliflower, fertilize again every 4 weeks. Keep the seedlings well watered and mulched to retain moisture and keep the roots cool.

If your seedlings have been held too long or mistreated in some way before planting, they can create "buttons", or small heads, that tend to flower prematurely.

Climatic elements such as extreme cold and drought can cause your plants to halt their full growth and form only "buttons."
Amigo
 
  2  
Reply Sat 10 Apr, 2010 09:02 pm
@Butrflynet,
Thank you very much for your input Butrflynet. I read carfully and will do what it says.

I will post results here or on another gardening thread I might start. I need lots of advice.

I am giving this food (some of it) to the food bank so freash veggies can be on the dinner table and some will go to an animal shelter for far animals.

And so I don't have to pay for organic vegitables.
Amigo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Apr, 2010 09:11 pm
@Amigo,
corrections

Fresh veggies not "freash veggies" and farm animals not "far animals"
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  2  
Reply Sat 10 Apr, 2010 11:06 pm
@Amigo,
I'm in the process of planting a large vegetable garden too. In fact next week I'll be putting in lots of plants and starting seedlings. Just got finished building the gardens and all I am waiting on is the delivery of a huge pile of compost on Tuesday.

I'll be growing at least 1 of just about every common herb and veggie using the square-foot gardening method. Am having to relearn what varieties will work here and how to help them adapt to the arid, hot summers and cold winters of Albuquerque.

Been doing lots of research. If you have questions about other veggies, don't be bashful about asking. I've lots of good links!
Amigo
 
  1  
Reply Sun 11 Apr, 2010 02:36 am
@Butrflynet,
Thank god, You are just the person I am looking for except we are in totally different areas.

You can bet I will take you up on your offer. Right now I have four brussle sprouts, one cherry tomato, three early bird tomatos (upper Utah, short growing season) and four brocolis.

Last year I had about three hundred seedlings. While I looked at them I would fantasize about how my garden of eden would be. I was totally ignorant about gardening. Everything died except like two plants.Lots of money a labor down the drain. This year I learned my lesson. I will do what I am told by the pros.
BorisKitten
 
  1  
Reply Sun 11 Apr, 2010 01:24 pm
@Amigo,
I read recently that the only difference between someone with a "green thumb" and someone with a "black thumb" was sheer persistence.

I see gardening as a long series of experiments; it's a lot more fun that way, to me.

Our last expected frost date, here in Florida, is 2/28. However, lots of plants die in the Florida summer heat.

I'm a beginning gardener too, planting things in containers for now... we'll see what happens!

Edit: I have cherry tomatoes too! I suspect I was too late to start them, and they'll die in the heat. Oh, well... next year is a new year.
Amigo
 
  2  
Reply Sun 11 Apr, 2010 08:41 pm
@BorisKitten,
Yea but you can get 6 plants for 3 bucks or less so just keep buying and planting, the ones that harden will harden and the rest will die. put up a shade where the sun hit them at the hottest time of day?
0 Replies
 
 

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