10
   

Do all languages raise the voice at the end of a sentence when asking a question?

 
 
GoshisDead
 
  3  
Reply Tue 6 Jul, 2010 10:26 am
@fresco,
English speakers do it unless they are actually using a question word. It is requisit to asking a question without a question word as there is no means aside from stress accent to discern between common question usage like "that one?" and common statement "that one." and the common exclamation "that one!"
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  2  
Reply Tue 6 Jul, 2010 03:31 pm
@bmom,
Quote:
My friends and I however were schooled in grammer and proper englishl,


You can pretty much bet that anyone who has been "schooled in grammar and proper English", and accepts those teachings as fact, doesn't know much about language and how it works.
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jul, 2010 03:45 pm
@fresco,
fresco wrote:
BTW I find the Australian habit of raising the pitch at the end of almost every sentence most annoying ! Smile


Really? I thought it was charming.
0 Replies
 
GoshisDead
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jul, 2010 04:08 pm
DAH DAH DAH DAH DAH DAH DAH CHARGE?
0 Replies
 
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jul, 2010 04:13 pm
KYA huwa? WHAT happened?
0 Replies
 
NoOne phil
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Oct, 2010 02:41 pm
@The Pentacle Queen,
Languages don't have a voice. Speakers of a language have a voice. Thus you would have to ask each and every one of them.
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Oct, 2010 04:15 pm
@NoOne phil,
I suggest you check out "phonology" with respect to the definition of "language".
NoOne phil
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Oct, 2010 06:11 pm
@fresco,
fresco wrote:

I suggest you check out "phonology" with respect to the definition of "language".

You might want to consider that language is independent of the media. The same language can be written, spoken, sent my radio.
Also, give a thought about what can and cannot be conventionalized in a language.
Therefore the topic is not the language, but how to express the language in a particular media.
0 Replies
 
ragnel
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Oct, 2010 06:35 pm
@JTT,
I was interested in this thread because I have often wondered why the New Yorkers I have come across begin a sentence, be it a statement, a question or whatever, in a normal voice, but as they go on the pitch gets more and more reedy until the end of the sentence comes as a high squeak.

Jerry Seinfeld is a perfect example.

However, as it seems the thread is simply a vehicle for Pq and Fresco to criticise the way Australians speak there is really no point in getting involved in any real discussion. I'm not really interested in getting into a slanging match over it.
fresco wrote -
Quote:
I find the Australian habit of raising the pitch at the end of almost every sentence most annoying !

The Pentacle Queen wrote -
Quote:
Ditto!

fresco wrote -
Quote:
Most of the guys on the airport/border TV programmes appear to do it. Does that imply they are "uneducated".

No, but they are not trained actors with speech coaches helping them out. They are just ordinary, eveyday people; some perhaps have had a little more education than others. I could not guess what the structure of the English curriculum is in American schools, but in Australia there are a number of levels. Some people simply choose a level that allows them to read and write and speak the language so that they can be understood and make their way reasonably well in life. Others are a little more interested in words and meanings, the historical roots of language and how it has changed and developed over the ages and continues to do so. They enjoy words, and like a little more depth to their forms of communication. This includes not only grammar and syntax but vocal expression as well.

JTT wrote -
Quote:
You can pretty much bet that anyone who has been "schooled in grammar and proper English", and accepts those teachings as fact, doesn't know much about language and how it works.

No, I couldn't be bothered.....

0 Replies
 
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Oct, 2010 01:18 am
Language functions at several levels. Anybody with smattering of academic "linguistics" knows that "language" as an interpersonal communication device has phonological rules established by native speakers. The raising of the voice at the end of a statement has hitherto been a phonological marker for "the interrogative". But language, like clothing, is also subject to fashionable trends because it also functions at the level of social conformity and convergence. Those who are against this particular stylistic shift are indeed making a social statement. They are saying that those who adopt a particular affectation which breaks conventional (majority) phonological rules, are similar to those who expose their navels in cold weather in order to conform to fashion.

Arguments about written forms of language are totally irrelevant in this instance.
NoOne phil
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Oct, 2010 03:51 am
@fresco,
Oh, now I understand. Non-standard standards.
I don't believe that was what I was getting at.

And don't worry. The theory of languge I am continuing to develope is by people far away from academic circles.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Oct, 2010 11:36 am
@fresco,
Quote:
Those who are against this particular stylistic shift are indeed making a social statement. They are saying that those who adopt a particular affectation which breaks conventional (majority) phonological rules, are similar to those who expose their navels in cold weather in order to conform to fashion.


Really? [rising intonation; the spoken word]
0 Replies
 
Cyracuz
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 06:45 pm
@The Pentacle Queen,
Not all questions end with the "melody" of the voice rising at the end of the sentence.

"Do you want icecream?" This question has the raised tone at the end. In norwegian it would not have if the question was asked with incredulity..
"Where do you think you are going?" may have it, or it may not, depending on how the question is meant.
Cyracuz
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 06:54 pm
@Cyracuz,
I thunk some more on it, and it seems to me that the tone of the voice relates to nuances of what is actually being asked.

He asked one of many who were walking away: "Where do you think you're going?"

Someone says he doesn't know where he is going. It might be reasonable to ask: "Where do you think you are going?"
And if the answer didn't satisfy, he might ask again slightly differently: "Where do you think you are going?"

The cursive word is the one that will have the highest pitch in the spoken sentence.

0 Replies
 
 

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