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What does this word mean?

 
 
jc23kl9
 
Reply Sat 30 Jan, 2010 11:57 pm
Growing up in Australia in the 1950's, the word "shiyak/shiak" or similar was used to mean "fool around" i.e." be serious, no shiyaking" My parents used it but I never thought to ask them what it meant when they were alive. Probably, even they didn't know. I'm just assuming it might be Jewish -can anybody help?
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Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 3,994 • Replies: 7
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dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Jan, 2010 12:08 am
geez mate i dunno. i cant find anything with google. but spelling could be your biggest problem

my parents certainly used the word. I'll have to have a yak to em.
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dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Jan, 2010 12:17 am
here we go bloke

shyacking
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dlowan
 
  2  
Reply Sun 31 Jan, 2010 12:18 am
@jc23kl9,

[edit]Alternative spellings
chyack
[edit]Verb
to chiack (third-person singular simple present chiacks, present participle chiacking, simple past and past participle chiacked)
(Australian) To taunt or tease in jest.
(British) To taunt maliciously.
The gang of youths chiacked the academic
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dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Jan, 2010 12:48 am

mum thought it might be spelled with a ch

chiaking ........shyacking


There is a chiaking (town ) in japan and i wondered if the word may have some association with that.
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dadpad
 
  2  
Reply Sun 31 Jan, 2010 12:55 am
Origin:
1870"75; prob. alteration of cheek
=============================================

chiack , chyack (Austral)
informal
vb tr
1 to tease or banter
n
2 good-humoured banter
(C19: from chi-hike, a shout or greeting)
http://dictionary.reverso.net/english-definition/chiack
=====================================

(British) To taunt maliciously.
http://www.allwords.com/word-chiack.html
dlowan
 
  2  
Reply Sun 31 Jan, 2010 01:19 am
@dadpad,
That's damned interesting!

The meaning suggested for the word in the first post is different again.

Sounds more like "skylarking".


1. Skylarking
to fool around or act astranged also to galavant or to commit tom foolery or shanaghins
Steve i've had up to here with you skylarking


2. Skylarking 99 up, 12 down
buy skylarking mugs, tshirts and magnets
Tomfooleries, Shennanigans, Kooky Mishaps, Humorous Antics, or any kind of act that is packed full of mischeivious content.
If you don't put a stop to those skylarkings of yours, I will not hesitate to drown you in pork gravy.

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dadpad
 
  2  
Reply Sun 31 Jan, 2010 01:49 am
@jc23kl9,
So there you go bloke.
Although the answers are not definitive the word is probably not Jewish and probably British in origin.
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