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where does the saying originate

 
 
lovejoy
 
Reply Sun 7 Dec, 2008 04:18 am
why do americans call a cup of coffee a cup of joe?
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Type: Question • Score: 6 • Views: 3,151 • Replies: 12

 
flyboy804
 
  3  
Reply Sun 7 Dec, 2008 05:10 am
@lovejoy,
Possibly a substitution for "cup of Java" another expression coming from a coffee source.
lovejoy
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Dec, 2008 09:42 am
@flyboy804,
i always thought of "java" as being a cup of tea
Merry Andrew
 
  2  
Reply Sun 7 Dec, 2008 09:47 am
@lovejoy,
No, around these parts Java is always coffee. I think the shift from Java to 'joe' is correct.
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Dec, 2008 02:09 pm
@Merry Andrew,

Cup of Joe

Josephus Daniels (18 May 1862-15 January 1948) was appointed Secretary of the Navy by President Woodrow Wilson in 1913. Among his reforms of the Navy were inaugurating the practice of making 100 Sailors from the Fleet eligible for entrance into the Naval Academy, the introduction of women into the service, and the abolishment of the officers' wine mess. From that time on, the strongest drink aboard Navy ships could only be coffee and over the years, a cup of coffee became known as "a cup of Joe".

Robert Gentel
 
  2  
Reply Sun 7 Dec, 2008 02:44 pm
@McTag,
http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/cup_of_joe

Quote:
The phrase "cup of Joe" goes back to the mid-1840s. Despite the folk etymology that the phrase derives from Josephus Daniels, the Secretary of the Navy who banned the serving of alcohol on ships in 1914, the phrase is known to predate his service.
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Dec, 2008 03:03 pm
@Robert Gentel,


Oh yes.

As zomebody once zaid, data is not the plural of anecdote.

Smile Drunk
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Dec, 2008 03:45 pm
@McTag,
Cheer up, Mac. It's possible, you know, that although the phrase 'cup of joe' had been around for quite a while, Jesephus Daniels' edict helped to popularize it, while its putative antecedent 'cuppa Java' fell into relative disuse. 2 Cents
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Mar, 2013 05:15 pm
I love coffee, I love tea
I love the the Java Jive and it loves me
Coffee and tea and the java and me
A cup, a cup, a cup, a cup, a cup (Boy)

I love java, sweet and hot
Whoops Mr. Moto, I'm a coffee pot
Shoot the pot and I'll pour me a shot
A cup, a cup, a cup, a cup, a cup

Oh slip me a slug from the wonderful mug
And I'll cut a rug just snug in a jug
A sliced up onion and a raw one
Draw one -
Waiter, waiter, percolator

The Manhatten Transfer recorded this some time back....very talented
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Mar, 2013 07:20 pm
After some thought it occurred to me that asking for a cuppa joe was more of a 40s -50s phrase in American films. If I want coffee when I'm in a restaurant I ask for high test, so they don't pour decaf. I don't think I've ever heard an actual person ask for a cup of joe.
0 Replies
 
Sage of Main Street
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jul, 2016 02:04 pm
@Robert Gentel,
It's probably like Civil War general Hooker getting credit for that slang for "prostitute." It's just as logical for it to mean the girl going out and hooking customers, as in fishing.
0 Replies
 
Sage of Main Street
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jul, 2016 02:08 pm
@McTag,
<b> On-Air Airheads </b>

"Data" is the plural of "datum." The Diploma Dumbos in the media (also plural) introduced this word to the general public a few decades ago in order to sound educated to stupid people but not to people who knew the word before that. It's better to describe it as phony grammar than bad grammar, which may imply ignorance rather than deception.
McTag
 
  2  
Reply Wed 27 Jul, 2016 10:49 am
@Sage of Main Street,
Is it true that the word "flammable" had to be introduced in wartime (1939-1945) because GIs might be confused as to the meaning of "inflammable"?
0 Replies
 
 

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