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The 100 Greatest Science Fiction/Fantasy Novels of All Time

 
 
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 04:00 pm
@DrewDad,
My thoughts:
- I thought LOTR was a bit long. Tolkein spent a lot of time on the world building part causing the storyline to drag. The Hobbit was faster paced.
- I agree that Modisett should be on there.
- I think Bear should have some representation, probably "Darwin's Radio".
- I'm glad the "Hyperion" series got some recognition.
- "The Demon Princes" is definitely dated and not worth including here; I'm surprised anyone would include it.
- I think Wells in under-represented with War of the Worlds. While that was a great book, what about "The Island of Dr. Moreau" or "The Time Machine"?
- I really don't know what criteria the author used to make the list. Does it have to be a great read? Does it have to be "meaningful"? The Wolfe stuff never made my list as great reads. Does LeGuin really merit having two novels in the top ten?
- Jack McDevitt is writing great stuff; really painting a picture of realistic space exploration. "Engines of God" is definitely worthy of mention.
- Frank Herbert was better than just "Dune". The "White Plague" was excellent.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 04:06 pm
@engineer,
engineer wrote:
Does LeGuin really merit having two novels in the top ten?

IMO, yes. A writer that makes you think.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 04:08 pm
Flowers for Algernon is a science fiction short story and subsequent novel written by Daniel Keyes. The short story, written in 1958 and first published in the April 1959 issue of The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, won the Hugo Award for Best Short Story in 1960.[2] The novel was published in 1966 and was joint winner of that year's Nebula Award for Best Novel (with Babel-17).[3]

DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 04:11 pm
@edgarblythe,
I've read the short story, but not the novel. I have a hard time believing that increasing it to novel length is an improvement.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 04:14 pm
@DrewDad,
DrewDad wrote:

I've read the short story, but not the novel. I have a hard time believing that increasing it to novel length is an improvement.


It was the publisher that prevailed on the author to expand it. I read only the original.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 04:17 pm
@edgarblythe,
Sure. The publisher waved $$$ at the author, and the author grabbed the money and began typing feverishly.

This is not how great works of literature are written, I suspect.
fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 04:46 pm
Bad list, I agree with many.
It also goes well over the top on the definition of "Fantasy", at least.
Animal Farm, 1984 & The Master and Margarita certainly don't fall in that category, IMO.
And The Fountainhead? Not serious.

Non English sci-fi is missing. In my personal top ten I include Solaris, by Stalislaw Lem and The Genius, by Dieter Elsfeld.
Asimov, LeGuin and Dick are not well read by the author of the list, it seems (though Ubik is indeed a masterpiece).
No Brian Aldiss?
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 06:59 pm
@djjd62,
98. Beggars in Spain by Nancy Kress *
96. Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson ***
92. Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton *
87. Speaker for the Dead by Orson Scott Card ***
85. Sphere by Michael Crichton *
80. Watership Down by Richard Adams *
76. Rendezvous with Rama by Arthur C. Clarke *
70. The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury *
63. Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes *
56. Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut *
52. Foundation by Isaac Asimov *
47. Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card *
40. Animal Farm by George Orwell *
39. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams *
38. Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut Jr.*
27. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury *
26. 1984 by George Orwell *
22. Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll *
18. Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein *
11. Dune by Frank Herbert *
10. A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess ***
7. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley *
6. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley *

* = Read
*** = I own a copy or reserved a copy from the library but have yet to read it.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 07:33 pm
@DrewDad,
DrewDad wrote:

Sure. The publisher waved $$$ at the author, and the author grabbed the money and began typing feverishly.

This is not how great works of literature are written, I suspect.


It's pretty much how Don Quixote was written.
Merry Andrew
 
  2  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 07:39 pm
@edgarblythe,
And if I remember correctly, the short story version of "Algernon" served as the basis for the Oscar-winning movie Charly, which I remember fondly only because the "location" scenes were filmed in Boston.
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 07:42 pm
Read approximately 23 of those books or series (some series I read only one book from). I may be leaving a few out.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 07:45 pm
@Merry Andrew,
I watched Charley two or three times.
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 07:48 pm
There's no Terry Pratchett on this list! Harrumph!
0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 08:41 pm
A canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller, Jr
Voyage to articuris by David Lindsay
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 08:46 pm
@DrewDad,
DrewDad wrote:

engineer wrote:
Does LeGuin really merit having two novels in the top ten?

IMO, yes. A writer that makes you think.

But is it a great read? LeGuin is ok; thought provoking, but ok. You want thought provoking and good reading? How about "Wicked. The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West"? Of course, they watered this down dramatically and made it a musical, but the book and its sequel are outstanding.
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 08:53 pm
@engineer,
I just noticed that Philip José Farmer's Riverworld Series is not represented either. It's not going to be top ten, but easily top 100. Where are books by Weber - Honor Harrington and such? Not very deep, but extremely entertaining. How about the Sword of Truth series by Goodkind? Lots of political commentary in that one. Peter Hamilton's stuff is missing as well. Night's Dawn Trilogy is one you can't put down. How about CJ Cherryh? I'd nominate Cyteen from her.
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 09:07 pm
@engineer,
engineer wrote:
But is it a great read? LeGuin is ok; thought provoking, but ok. You want thought provoking and good reading? How about "Wicked. The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West"? Of course, they watered this down dramatically and made it a musical, but the book and its sequel are outstanding.

I find LeGuin to be very entertaining, in addition to thought provoking. Personally, I'm familiar with more authors who are entertaining than I am with authors that make me think. Potboilers are easy.

I started Wicked, but didn't finish it. I may give it another go sometime.
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 09:40 pm
I love LeGuine. The Earth Sea series was a little dated, maybe. But, it certainly took me to a different world.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Wed 27 Jan, 2010 09:46 pm
If you're going to include H.G. Wells, how can you omit Jules Verne?

Oh, that's right. Verne wrote in French. My bad.
0 Replies
 
Ionus
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Jan, 2010 06:28 pm
@djjd62,
Sight at once abhorred !!! Who put Frankenstein ahead of Starship Troopers ? Ok, one is about the evil we do to each other through sexual selection but surely that is relative ? War and understanding it are probably essential for the survival of a democracy, or else we will end up invading little countries for money.
Good list though, djjd62. Bit gutsy putting it here, you will attract more flies than a week old road kill. Maybe you can be their Lord ?

Oh, and Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy is not fiction.
 

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