Reply Tue 15 Dec, 2009 08:13 pm
I found another really cool thing Smile

printed in 1927, my shakey german says it is an alternative book for the german teacher.
I have just installed a translator program to firefox to attempt to help me make out the words in the book. I can piece together very few words and because of that I am lost at what this really is.

I would like to find something on google about it, but when I use the terms I think to use, I get nothing.

I have googled -
1927 german teaching book
1927 alternative book for the german teacher ( the literal translation)
1927 book printed in berlin
Alterntaive book for the german
German teacher 1927
and then I have used what I assume to be the name of the creator and or writer of the book, the information found on the bottom cover.

Other then that.......Nothing.

Im stumped.

Photos coming now.
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Type: Question • Score: 4 • Views: 4,217 • Replies: 24
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shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Dec, 2009 08:14 pm
http://photos-d.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs042.snc3/12939_242077821752_676671752_4132853_2426820_n.jpg
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Dec, 2009 08:19 pm
http://photos-g.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs042.snc3/12939_242155886752_676671752_4133100_6785167_n.jpg


http://photos-a.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs042.snc3/12939_242155911752_676671752_4133101_2096767_n.jpg



http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs042.snc3/12939_242155936752_676671752_4133102_2530310_n.jpg
0 Replies
 
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Dec, 2009 08:19 pm
By no means are these photos taken correctly.
I apologize if they are too bad, but I think even with the shakey photo you can read the text
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Dec, 2009 08:50 pm
It translates to "Book to help German lessons" and it's written in old German
lettering that was used before WWII.
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Dec, 2009 08:55 pm
@shewolfnm,
In smaller letters it reads: for the elementary level of higher educational
establishments.

Lessons for pronunciation, grammar and punctuation
from
Dr. R Janus and Dr. E. A. Carstensen
hamburgboy
 
  2  
Reply Tue 15 Dec, 2009 09:02 pm
@shewolfnm,
the only entry i could find was for the publisher : TEUBNER

see here : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bibliotheca_Teubneriana

teubner was/is one of the biggest publishers of textbooks in germany .

here is what i found under " google.de " - handy when you want to find a german/european entry :

http://www.google.de/search?hl=de&source=hp&q=teubner+studienb%C3%BCcher&meta=&rlz=1R2GGLL_en&aq=8&oq=teubner+

( yes , there is a separate " google.de " for the german language )
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Dec, 2009 09:29 pm
@CalamityJane,
now that makes sense.
What little german I know is making this book hard for me to read.
It has taken me an hour to translate one paragraph. I gave up on several words and used google translate.
The opening paragraph read to me like this -

"Preface
after the reorganization of our higher education system, the provisions of obesity for almost all times have such an abundance of new names on teaching duties with pride, represent the most basic..." and thats as far as I have gotten. Laughing

The word obesity does not fit.
shewolfnm
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Dec, 2009 09:33 pm
@hamburgboy,
so, teubner.. not the other names/words.. is the publisher? It appeared to me to be a name so I by passed looking that up.

now it makes sense Smile some what..
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Dec, 2009 10:05 pm
@shewolfnm,
Hehe, obesity was not a problem in 1927 Laughing

Most translation programs cannot read the old German writing, that's where
the confusion comes in. Even I have trouble making out some words as I have
never used the old letters.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Dec, 2009 10:31 pm
That Gothic style of lettering was called, I believe, fraktur and although it was officially abandoned at the end of WW I (1918) it actually continued in use in some cases (especially for reprints of pre-war publications) well into the 1920s. What you've got, Shewolf, is an old textbook for teaching the German language.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Dec, 2009 11:37 pm
@Merry Andrew,
Since the late 18th century, Fraktur had been progressively replaced by Antiqua as a symbol of the classicist age and emerging cosmopolitanism. The debate surrounding this move is known as the Antiqua-Fraktur dispute.
The change of Fraktur to Antiqua on January 3, 1941 Martin Bormann issued a circular to all public offices which declared Fraktur (and its corollary, the Sütterlin-based handwriting) to be Judenlettern (Jewish letters) and prohibited their further use. It has been speculated[by whom?] that the régime had realized that Fraktur would inhibit communication in the territories occupied during World War II. Fraktur saw a short resurgence after the War, but quickly disappeared in a Germany keen on modernising its appearance.

Fraktur is today used mostly for decorative typesetting; for example, a number of traditional German newspapers such as the Frankfurter Allgemeine,
saab
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Dec, 2009 11:42 pm
@shewolfnm,
Use a good dictionary when translating.
Translations in internet often come out wrong.
If you use internet translation for one sentence you have to correct the sentence by using a dictionary and your own common sence, something which a tranlation machine does not have.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Dec, 2009 03:32 am
It was a quite comon book for teachers - thus, you can get in for 8 Euros up to 16 Euros (when in excellent condition).


Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Dec, 2009 03:40 am
@saab,
Fraktur was used in Germany during the time that book was printed/published only rarely ... in schoolbooks - most were printed in Antiqua.
The use of Fraktur here is related a) to German lessons (about 15% of books still were printed in Fraktur in those years), and b) to the editors.

(When the Nazis governed, Fraktur became more common again - up to 50% of books were printed in Fraktur.)
saab
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Dec, 2009 03:50 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Why did the Nazis prefer Fraktur to Antiqua?
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Dec, 2009 04:11 am
@saab,
Looked more "Germanic". Publications by Jewish printers weren't allowed in Fraktur from July 1937.

From 1940 onwards, the use of Fraktur again became uncommon.



In German:
Die Fraktur und der Nationalsozialismus
Fraktur und Antiqua
saab
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Dec, 2009 04:59 am
@Walter Hinteler,
I have a German-Danish/Norwegian dictionary printed in Denmark 1925.
The German words are in "German" Fraktur, which I can hardly read, the Danish translation is in what I call "Danish" Fraktur, which I can read.
The Danish/Norwegian words and German translation are in Antiqua.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Dec, 2009 07:37 am
@Walter Hinteler,
I've seen copies of it in a local Goodwill and the Value Village as well. I picked up an illustrated version (same publisher) for younger children for less than $1 Cdn. Also found an illustrated one for teaching French to German children. They're great fun to look at.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Dec, 2009 11:32 am
@saab,
Such was done here, too - especially, since Antiqua became 'modern'.
 

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