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We are stardust, we are golden

 
 
Reply Sat 15 Aug, 2009 08:14 pm
Soundtrack:



It has been 40 years since Woodstock.

What did you imagine the "garden" would be like?

How different are things from the garden you imagined?
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Type: Question • Score: 5 • Views: 2,202 • Replies: 13

 
Eva
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Aug, 2009 09:38 pm
Fewer people are stoned now than I thought they would be.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Aug, 2009 09:40 pm
I was surprised and disheartened how quickly things changed in the years that followed.
Merry Andrew
 
  3  
Reply Sat 15 Aug, 2009 10:36 pm
@boomerang,
If you remember Woodstock then you obviously weren't there.
0 Replies
 
tycoon
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Aug, 2009 07:55 am
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

I was surprised and disheartened how quickly things changed in the years that followed.


Not sure what you're referring to when you say things "quickly changed", but if you're talking about us baby boomers, I will heartily agree with you. My gosh, after the Vietnam War ended, it was surprising how quickly we quit our protests and our search for new utopian societies and embraced the old, rotten system already in place, where we became fabulously wealthy beyond our parents' dreams.

We did it by living beyond our means. We charged it. We'll leave it to our grandkids to pay for it. We can't be bothered nor discomforted, and we'll elect the politicians who understand our whims. We are the mighty baby boomers.
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boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Aug, 2009 06:54 pm
I was 8 when Woodstock happened. It wasn't even on my radar.

It seems like people imagined that we would live in a blissful utopia where everything would be different once "we" were in control.

I say "we" because I was really too young to understand the idea of blissful utopia but I am familiar with youthful optimism and angst.

What changes did the Woodstock generation bring to America?
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Aug, 2009 06:59 pm
@boomerang,
civil rights.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Aug, 2009 07:11 pm
@dyslexia,
dyslexia wrote:

civil rights.

Yup.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Aug, 2009 07:27 pm
Really?

It seems that most baby boomers would have been teenagers, during the heyday of the civil rights movement.

I mean, the start of the baby boom is considered 1946, the start of the civil rights movement is considered 1955. MLK was assisnated in 68 - so the very, very first of the boomers were 22.

Can the boomers really take credit for civil rights?
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Aug, 2009 07:38 pm
@boomerang,
well, I wouldn't specifically credit "boomers" with the civil rights movement, personally I got involved with the Bracero program in 66 and rapidly moved to a more generalized "civil rights" when I joined Congress on Racial Equality in 68. But the seeds were being sown with the ending of the Korean war (integration of the armed forces)
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Aug, 2009 07:41 pm
I saw the 60s as the culmination of the Civil Rights movement, which began, in my opinion, in colonial times. It wasn't a clean finish. There will always be new battles to be fought if the gains are to be kept alive.
0 Replies
 
stevefrank
 
  0  
Reply Fri 31 Aug, 2012 06:07 am
@boomerang,
Nothing in this video. it's not working..
roger
 
  2  
Reply Fri 31 Aug, 2012 08:45 am
@stevefrank,
It probably worked three years ago when it was posted.
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Mar, 2019 01:59 am

https://imgur.com/1LA4Y4f.jpg
0 Replies
 
 

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