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What are the three best poems ever written and why?

 
 
djjd62
 
  2  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2009 05:47 am
not sure about best, but three of my faves

an unrequited love of mine, once told me this poem reminded her of me

Not Waving But Drowning
Stevie Smith

Nobody heard him, the dead man,
But still he lay moaning:
I was much further out than you thought
And not waving but drowning.

Poor chap, he always loved larking
And now he's dead
It must have been too cold for him his heart gave way,
They said.

Oh, no no no, it was too cold always
(Still the dead one lay moaning)
I was much too far out all my life
And not waving but drowning.


the Breughels are perhaps my favourite artists, so this poem is just a natural for me

http://poetrypages.lemon8.nl/life/musee/icarusbreughel.jpg

Musee des Beaux Arts
W.H.Auden

About suffering they were never wrong,
The Old Masters; how well, they understood
Its human position; how it takes place
While someone else is eating or opening a window or just walking dully along;
How, when the aged are reverently, passionately waiting
For the miraculous birth, there always must be
Children who did not specially want it to happen, skating
On a pond at the edge of the wood:
They never forgot
That even the dreadful martyrdom must run its course
Anyhow in a corner, some untidy spot
Where the dogs go on with their doggy life and the torturer's horse
Scratches its innocent behind on a tree.

In Breughel's Icarus, for instance: how everything turns away
Quite leisurely from the disaster; the ploughman may
Have heard the splash, the forsaken cry,
But for him it was not an important failure; the sun shone
As it had to on the white legs disappearing into the green
Water; and the expensive delicate ship that must have seen
Something amazing, a boy falling out of the sky,
had somewhere to get to and sailed calmly on.


this poem speaks to me of permanence, but also the need to live in the now, especially the lines, "they have never imagined us in their future, how could we imagine them in the past"

Lament for the Dorsets
(Eskimos extinct in the 14th century A.D.)

Al Purdy

Animal bones and some mossy tent rings
scrapers and spearheads carved ivory swans
all that remains of the Dorset giants
who drove the Vikings back to their long ships
talked to spirits of earth and water
" a picture of terrifying old men
so large they broke the backs of bears
so small they lurk behind bone rafters
in the brain of modern hunters
among good thoughts and warm things
and come out at night
to spit on the stars

The big men with clever fingers
who had no dogs and hauled their sleds
over the frozen northern oceans
awkward giants
..........................killers of seal
they couldn’t compete with the little men
who came from the west with dogs
Or else in a warm climatic cycle
The seals went back to cold waters
and the puzzled Dorsets scratched their heads
with hairy thumbs around 1350 A.D.
" couldn’t figure it out
went around saying to each other
plaintively
..............'What’s wrong? What happened?
..............Where are the seals gone?’
And died

Twentieth century people
apartment dwellers
executives of neon death
warmakers with things that explode
" they have never imagined us in their future
how could we imagine them in the past
squatting among the moving glaciers
six hundred years ago
with glowing lamps?
As remote or nearly
as the trilobites and swamps
when coal became
or the last great reptile hissed
at a mammal the size of a mouse
that squeaked and fled

Did they realize at all
what was happening to them?
Some old hunter with one lame leg
a bear had chewed
Sitting in a caribou skin tent
" the last Dorset?
Let’s say his name was Kudluk
carving 2-inch ivory swans
for a dead grand-daughter
taking them out of his mind
the places in his mind
where pictures are
He selects a sharp stone tool
to gouge a parallel pattern of lines
on both sides of the swan
holding it with his left hand
bearing down and transmitting
his body’s weight
from brain to arm and right hand
and one of his thoughts
turns to ivory
The carving is laid aside
in beginning darkness
at the end of hunger
after a while wind
blows down the tent and snow
begins to cover him

After 600 years
the ivory thought
is still warm


0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2009 07:33 am
@iamsam82,
iamsam82 wrote:

Care to reproduce any of those poems (or parts of them if they are long) here? I'm afraid I am not familiar with any of those poets but would be interested to see their work.

You dont have google?
http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/snowy.html
http://www.middlemiss.org/lit/authors/patersonab/poetry/clancy.html

Slessor is a little difficult to find on the net.
http://oldpoetry.com/oauthor/show/Kenneth_Slessor
0 Replies
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2009 09:02 am
I've been pondering this question, but every time I pick three, I think of three
more I like better. I'm enjoying reading others' choices though. Some of these
I am not at all familiar with.
Robert Gentel
 
  2  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2009 09:15 am
My three favorite poems (not necessarily what I think are the three best poems ever written):

Infant Sorrow - William Blake

My mother groan'd! my father wept.
Into the dangerous world I leapt.
Helpless, naked, piping loud;
Like a fiend hid in a cloud.

Struggling in my father's hands,
Striving against my swaddling bands;
Bound and weary I thought best
To sulk upon my mother's breast.

Alone - Edgar Allan Poe

From childhood's hour I have not been
As others were; I have not seen
As others saw; I could not bring
My passions from a common spring.
From the same source I have not taken
My sorrow; I could not awaken
My heart to joy at the same tone;
And all I loved, I loved alone.
Then- in my childhood, in the dawn
Of a most stormy life- was drawn
From every depth of good and ill
The mystery which binds me still:
From the torrent, or the fountain,
From the red cliff of the mountain,
From the sun that round me rolled
In its autumn tint of gold,
From the lightning in the sky
As it passed me flying by,
From the thunder and the storm,
And the cloud that took the form
(When the rest of Heaven was blue)
Of a demon in my view.

The Raven - Edgar Allan Poe

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
`'Tis some visitor,' I muttered, `tapping at my chamber door -
Only this, and nothing more.'

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December,
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
Eagerly I wished the morrow; - vainly I had sought to borrow
From my books surcease of sorrow - sorrow for the lost Lenore -
For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels named Lenore -
Nameless here for evermore.

And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain
Thrilled me - filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before;
So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating
`'Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door -
Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door; -
This it is, and nothing more,'

Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer,
`Sir,' said I, `or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore;
But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping,
And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door,
That I scarce was sure I heard you' - here I opened wide the door; -
Darkness there, and nothing more.

Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before
But the silence was unbroken, and the darkness gave no token,
And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, `Lenore!'
This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, `Lenore!'
Merely this and nothing more.

Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,
Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.
`Surely,' said I, `surely that is something at my window lattice;
Let me see then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore -
Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore; -
'Tis the wind and nothing more!'

Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter,
In there stepped a stately raven of the saintly days of yore.
Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he;
But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door -
Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door -
Perched, and sat, and nothing more.

Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,
By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore,
`Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou,' I said, `art sure no craven.
Ghastly grim and ancient raven wandering from the nightly shore -
Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night's Plutonian shore!'
Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'

Much I marvelled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly,
Though its answer little meaning - little relevancy bore;
For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being
Ever yet was blessed with seeing bird above his chamber door -
Bird or beast above the sculptured bust above his chamber door,
With such name as `Nevermore.'

But the raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only,
That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour.
Nothing further then he uttered - not a feather then he fluttered -
Till I scarcely more than muttered `Other friends have flown before -
On the morrow he will leave me, as my hopes have flown before.'
Then the bird said, `Nevermore.'

Startled at the stillness broken by reply so aptly spoken,
`Doubtless,' said I, `what it utters is its only stock and store,
Caught from some unhappy master whom unmerciful disaster
Followed fast and followed faster till his songs one burden bore -
Till the dirges of his hope that melancholy burden bore
Of "Never-nevermore."'

But the raven still beguiling all my sad soul into smiling,
Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird and bust and door;
Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking
Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore -
What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt, and ominous bird of yore
Meant in croaking `Nevermore.'

This I sat engaged in guessing, but no syllable expressing
To the fowl whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosom's core;
This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease reclining
On the cushion's velvet lining that the lamp-light gloated o'er,
But whose velvet violet lining with the lamp-light gloating o'er,
She shall press, ah, nevermore!

Then, methought, the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen censer
Swung by Seraphim whose foot-falls tinkled on the tufted floor.
`Wretch,' I cried, `thy God hath lent thee - by these angels he has sent thee
Respite - respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore!
Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe, and forget this lost Lenore!'
Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'

`Prophet!' said I, `thing of evil! - prophet still, if bird or devil! -
Whether tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore,
Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted -
On this home by horror haunted - tell me truly, I implore -
Is there - is there balm in Gilead? - tell me - tell me, I implore!'
Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'

`Prophet!' said I, `thing of evil! - prophet still, if bird or devil!
By that Heaven that bends above us - by that God we both adore -
Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn,
It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels named Lenore -
Clasp a rare and radiant maiden, whom the angels named Lenore?'
Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'

`Be that word our sign of parting, bird or fiend!' I shrieked upstarting -
`Get thee back into the tempest and the Night's Plutonian shore!
Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken!
Leave my loneliness unbroken! - quit the bust above my door!
Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!'
Quoth the raven, `Nevermore.'

And the raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting
On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door;
And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming,
And the lamp-light o'er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor;
And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor
Shall be lifted - nevermore!
0 Replies
 
wandeljw
 
  2  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2009 09:44 am
I like Ezra Pound (although his poetry is difficult). In addition to his original poems, there were several ancient Chinese poems where his English translations are considered the most expressive. This one is my favorite:

Quote:
The River-Merchant's Wife
(Lin Po, translated by Ezra Pound)

While my hair was still cut straight across my forehead
I played about the front gate, pulling flowers.
You came by on bamboo stilts, playing horse,
You walked about my seat, playing with blue plums.
And we went on living in the village of Chokan:
Two small people, without dislike or suspicion.
At fourteen I married My Lord you.
I never laughed, being bashful.
Lowering my head, I looked at the wall.
Called to, a thousand times, I never looked back.

At fifteen I stopped scowling,
I desired my dust to be mingled with yours
Forever and forever and forever.
Why should I climb the look out?

At sixteen you departed,
You went into far Ku-to-en, by the river of swirling eddies,
And you have been gone five months.
The monkeys make sorrowful noise overhead.

You dragged your feet when you went out.
By the gate now, the moss is grown, the different mosses,
Too deep to clear them away!
The leaves fall early this autumn, in wind.
The paired butterflies are already yellow with August
Over the grass in the West garden;
They hurt me. I grow older.
If you are coming down through the narrows of the river Kiang,
Please let me know beforehand,
And I will come out to meet you
As far as Cho-fu-Sa.
0 Replies
 
iamsam82
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2009 04:21 pm
@George,
Come on Georgie, dish up a little Horace, Catullus or Virgil! Give it to us in the original!
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2009 04:30 pm
Since we all seem to be quoting.....

THE FORCE THAT THROUGH THE GREEN FUSE DRIVES THE FLOWER
Dylan Thomas

The force that through the green fuse drives the flower
Drives my green age; that blasts the roots of trees
Is my destroyer.
And I am dumb to tell the crooked rose
My youth is bent by the same wintry fever.

The force that drives the water through the rocks
Drives my red blood; that dries the mouthing streams
Turns mine to wax.
And I am dumb to mouth unto my veins
How at the mountain spring the same mouth sucks.

The hand that whirls the water in the pool
Stirs the quicksand; that ropes the blowing wind
Hauls my shroud sail.
And I am dumb to tell the hanging man
How of my clay is made the hangman's lime.

The lips of time leech to the fountain head;
Love drips and gathers, but the fallen blood
Shall calm her sores.
And I am dumb to tell a weather's wind
How time has ticked a heaven round the stars.

And I am dumb to tell the lover's tomb
How at my sheet goes the same crooked worm.
0 Replies
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2009 04:49 pm
@iamsam82,
Quote:
Come on Georgie, dish up a little Horace, Catullus or Virgil! Give it to us in the original!


In days of yore, I took a class we called "Horrible Horace and His Odious Odes".
That about sums up my views on Latin poesy.

About the only line of Latin poetry I recall is:
Quidquid id est, timeo Danaos et dona ferentes
0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Jul, 2009 02:13 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
Splinter
by Carl Sandburg

The voice of the last cricket
across the first frost
is one kind of good-bye.
It is so thin a splinter
of singing.


(I don't know if I got the line breaks right as I couldn't find this on the internet and I copied it from an assignment I did when I was eight years old which instructed us to collect what we thought were the best poems).

So I thought it was one of the best then and I still think it is now because it does exactly what a poem is supposed to do - invokes a mood and evokes a response potently yet concisely ( in this case- twenty-three words).
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Jul, 2009 02:07 pm
@iamsam82,
iamsam82 wrote:
What are the three best poems ever written and why?

Many people are probably thinking this is a subjective question and different people will have different opinions. But that's just WRONG. The absolute indisputable correct answer to the question is, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Coleridge, The Tyger by Blake and Row Row Row Your Boat by Whoever the heck did that.
Wink
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Aug, 2009 07:31 pm
Of course I cannot name three best poems, or even three favourite, but these often come to mind when I think of poetry I like:

W.B. Yeats (1865"1939). The Wind Among the Reeds. 1899.

9. The Song of Wandering Aengus

I WENT out to the hazel wood,
Because a fire was in my head,
And cut and peeled a hazel wand,
And hooked a berry to a thread;
And when white moths were on the wing, 5
And moth-like stars were flickering out,
I dropped the berry in a stream
And caught a little silver trout.

When I had laid it on the floor
I went to blow the fire a-flame, 10
But something rustled on the floor,
And someone called me by my name:
It had become a glimmering girl
With apple blossom in her hair
Who called me by my name and ran 15
And faded through the brightening air.

Though I am old with wandering
Through hollow lands and hilly lands,
I will find out where she has gone,
And kiss her lips and take her hands; 20
And walk among long dappled grass,
And pluck till time and times are done,
The silver apples of the moon,
The golden apples of the sun.




To Mistress Margaret Hussey

by John Skelton


Merry Margaret,
As midsummer flower,
Gentle as a falcon
Or hawk of the tower:
With solace and gladness,
Much mirth and no madness,
All good and no badness;
So joyously,
So maidenly,
So womanly
Her demeaning
In every thing,
Far, far passing
That I can indite,
Or suffice to write
Of Merry Margaret
As midsummer flower,
Gentle as falcon
Or hawk of the tower.
As patient and still
And as full of good will
As fair Isaphill,
Coriander,
Sweet pomander,
Good Cassander,
Steadfast of thought,
Well made, well wrought,
Far may be sought
Ere that ye can find
So courteous, so kind
As Merry Margaret,
This midsummer flower,
Gentle as falcon
Or hawk of the tower.


General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales

Geoffrey Chaucer

Whan that aprill with his shoures soote
The droghte of march hath perced to the roote,
And bathed every veyne in swich licour
Of which vertu engendred is the flour;
Whan zephirus eek with his sweete breeth
Inspired hath in every holt and heeth
Tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne
Hath in the ram his halve cours yronne,
And smale foweles maken melodye,
That slepen al the nyght with open ye
(so priketh hem nature in hir corages);
Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages,
And palmeres for to seken straunge strondes,
To ferne halwes, kowthe in sondry londes;
And specially from every shires ende
Of engelond to caunterbury they wende,
The hooly blisful martir for to seke,
That hem hath holpen whan that they were seeke.
Bifil that in that seson on a day,
In southwerk at the tabard as I lay
Redy to wenden on my pilgrymage
To caunterbury with ful devout corage,
At nyght was come into that hostelrye
Wel nyne and twenty in a compaignye,
Of sondry folk, by aventure yfalle
In felaweshipe, and pilgrimes were they alle,
That toward caunterbury wolden ryde.
The chambres and the stables weren wyde,
And wel we weren esed atte beste.
And shortly, whan the sonne was to reste,
So hadde I spoken with hem everichon
That I was of hir felaweshipe anon,
And made forward erly for to ryse,
To take oure wey ther as I yow devyse.
But nathelees, whil I have tyme and space,
Er that I ferther in this tale pace,
Me thynketh it acordaunt to resoun
To telle yow al the condicioun
Of ech of hem, so as it semed me,
And whiche they weren, and of what degree,
And eek in what array that they were inne;
And at a knyght than wol I first bigynne.



(modern version:


When April with his showers sweet with fruit
The drought of March has pierced unto the root
And bathed each vein with liquor that has power
To generate therein and sire the flower;
When Zephyr also has, with his sweet breath,
Quickened again, in every holt and heath,
The tender shoots and buds, and the young sun
Into the Ram one half his course has run,
And many little birds make melody
That sleep through all the night with open eye
(So Nature pricks them on to ramp and rage)-
Then do folk long to go on pilgrimage,
And palmers to go seeking out strange strands,
To distant shrines well known in sundry lands.
And specially from every shire's end
Of England they to Canterbury wend,
The holy blessed martyr there to seek
Who helped them when they lay so ill and weal
In Southwark, at the Tabard, as I lay
Ready to start upon my pilgrimage
To Canterbury, full of devout homage,
There came at nightfall to that hostelry
Some nine and twenty in a company
Of sundry persons who had chanced to fall
In fellowship, and pilgrims were they all
That toward Canterbury town would ride.
The rooms and stables spacious were and wide,
And well we there were eased, and of the best.
And briefly, when the sun had gone to rest,
So had I spoken with them, every one,
That I was of their fellowship anon,
And made agreement that we'd early rise
To take the road, as you I will apprise.
Before yet farther in this tale I pace,
It seems to me accordant with reason
To inform you of the state of every one
Of all of these, as it appeared to me,
And who they were, and what was their degree,
And even how arrayed there at the inn;
And with a knight thus will I first begin.)
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Aug, 2009 07:35 pm
@dlowan,
For some reason this is one I can never forget:

Buffalo Bill's
defunct
who used to
ride a watersmooth-silver
stallion
and break onetwothreefourfive pigeonsjustlikethat
Jesus
he was a handsome man
and what i want to know is
how do you like your blueeyed boy
Mister Death

-- E. E. Cummings



and I always loved this one...even before the film made it famous:


W. H. Auden

Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone,
Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone,
Silence the pianos and with muffled drum
Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come.

Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead
Scribbling on the sky the message He Is Dead,
Put crepe bows round the white necks of the public doves,
Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves.

He was my North, my South, my East and West,
My working week and my Sunday rest,
My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song;
I thought that love would last for ever: I was wrong.

The stars are not wanted now: put out every one;
Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun;
Pour away the ocean and sweep up the wood.
For nothing now can ever come to any good.
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  2  
Reply Sat 1 Aug, 2009 08:11 pm
I believe the question posed at the start of this thread has no real answer. There are many wonderful poems in the English language that express a wide variety of emotions and perspectives on life. How we interpret them and the degree to which they resonate with us depends greatly on the individual experience, understanding and sensitivity of the reader.

Beyond that there are other universes of poetry written in many other languages, few of which any of us can hope to truly understand.

Still some poems meaningfully touch on near universal sentiments far better than others. Fitzgerald's translation of Khayyam's Rubaiyat is one of the best and most read. Other sections have been pasted here, but here is one of my favorites;

The Worldly Hope men set their Hearts upon
Turns Ashes--or it prospers; and anon,
Like Snow upon the Desert's dusty Face
Lighting a little Hour or two--is gone.

And those who husbanded the Golden Grain,
And those who flung it to the Winds like Rain,
Alike to no such aureate Earth are turn'd
As, buried once, Men want dug up again.

Think, in this batter'd Caravanserai
Whose Doorways are alternate Night and Day,
How Sultan after Sultan with his Pomp
Abode his Hour or two, and went his way.

They say the Lion and the Lizard keep
The Courts where Jamshyd gloried and drank deep:
And Bahram, that great Hunter--the Wild Ass
Stamps o'er his Head, and he lies fast asleep.

I sometimes think that never blows so red
The Rose as where some buried Caesar bled;
That every Hyacinth the Garden wears
Dropt in its Lap from some once lovely Head.

And this delightful Herb whose tender Green
Fledges the River's Lip on which we lean--
Ah, lean upon it lightly! for who knows
From what once lovely Lip it springs unseen!
0 Replies
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Aug, 2009 08:33 pm
@rosborne979,
Quote:
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Coleridge, The Tyger by Blake and Row Row Row Your Boat by Whoever the heck did that.

A Daniel come to judgment!
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Aug, 2009 08:44 pm
@George,
George wrote:

Quote:
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Coleridge, The Tyger by Blake and Row Row Row Your Boat by Whoever the heck did that.

A Daniel come to judgment!

Sorry George, I don't know what that means.
George
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Aug, 2009 08:47 pm
@rosborne979,
It's from The Merchant of Venice.
Someone who makes a wise judgment about something that has previously
proven difficult to resolve.
Uttered here somewhat tongue-in-cheek.

How's things in the Hampshire?
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Aug, 2009 09:10 pm
@George,
George wrote:

It's from The Merchant of Venice.
Someone who makes a wise judgment about something that has previously
proven difficult to resolve.
Uttered here somewhat tongue-in-cheek.

Ahh, I see Smile
George wrote:

How's things in the Hampshire?

Too much rain.
How's things down in the big city?
George
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Aug, 2009 09:12 pm
@rosborne979,
Spent the weekend in Boston with friends from waaaay back in the day.
Outrageous fun.
0 Replies
 
spikepipsqueak
 
  2  
Reply Fri 21 Aug, 2009 09:27 pm
@iamsam82,
What are the three best poems ever written and why?


A Valediction Forbidding Mourning by John Donne

Or possibly something I can't track down by Sarl Sandburg, which begins

"This is the age of the half-read page..."

iamsam82 wrote:

... and who is the best poet?


I vote for Shakespeare as the best poet. Insight, quality, quantity.
0 Replies
 
jjorge
 
  1  
Reply Fri 20 Nov, 2009 10:22 pm
I can't say what are 'the three best poems ever written' nor can I say who the greatest poet is ( probably Shakespeare) ...but I CAN tell you my three FAVORITE poems and my FAVORITE poet.

favorite poems:

'In Memory of W.B. Yeats' --- W.H. Auden

'One Art' ------------------------ Elizabeth Bishop

''Death of The Hired Man' ---- Robert Frost

My favorite poet: Robert Frost. His poems are accessible and 'satisfying'.
I also love them because they are mostly set in my native New England and evoke images of that place.

my other favorite poets include:

Emily Dickinson, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Patrick Kavanagh, Philip Larkin, Langston Hughes, W.B. Yeats, Seamus Heaney, Thomas Hardy, Ana Akhmatova, Robert Hayden, Wendell Berry, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Horace, Dorothy Parker, and Mary Oliver -- to name a few! :-)

I know, I know, T.M.I. -- sorry.


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