7
   

Bull Durham Sacks and Railroad Tracks

 
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 05:18 pm
@farmerman,
My folks bought a farm near Schellsburgh in 1974 and I used to see the same ad on my way up there from DC.
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 05:24 pm
@farmerman,
here's a cool little blog that shows more stuff like that

Preserve

http://www.preserve.co.nz/images/mens_1.jpg

http://www.preserve.co.nz/images/martindale-texas05.jpg
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 05:29 pm
I once let a man talk me into trying a plug of tobacco. It didn't take over two minutes to get me sick enough to miss most of a day of work. And I was a hearty cigar smoker at the time.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 05:31 pm
@edgarblythe,
My grandfather worked for the railroad for 44 years, 1913 to 1957 (they gave him seniority for his service in the Great War). I saw a lot of railroads and rail yards, and i have seen the interior of a caboose. They had pot bellied stoves (the ones i've seen, at least) which could be fired with the coal they were still burning when i was a boy, although diesels were taking over--every railyard had heaps of coal, though. Anyone who has ever relied upon a pot bellied stove for heat knows you can cook on them, too. We had a small cabin in the woods by a lake, and my grandmother would cook up a meal in cast iron skillets on such a stove.
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 05:32 pm
http://img91.imageshack.us/img91/8936/caboosey.jpg

took this photo of an Atlantic Coast Line caboose in Boca Raton.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 05:36 pm
@djjd62,
There used to be a bar in Aztec, NM called the Dog House. If you knew oilfield terminology, you wouldn't bring your wife. Well, if she had a Harley tattoo with a big red number 1 , maybe. . . .
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 05:41 pm
I seem to recall a fancy little restaurant in Santa Fe which was either in a caboose, or a dining car . . . maybe i can find that . . .
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 05:42 pm
a detroit radio station may years ago had a sunday morning quiz program that pitted two teams of two professors from various detroit universities and colleges to answer questions submitted by listeners, one that i loved presented the panelists with a list of railroad acronyms, and asked not for the real names but the nicknames they were known by, the only one i can remember now is the B&O (Baltimore & Ohio) was know as the "Broke & Owing
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 05:45 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

My grandfather worked for the railroad for 44 years, 1913 to 1957 (they gave him seniority for his service in the Great War). I saw a lot of railroads and rail yards, and i have seen the interior of a caboose. They had pot bellied stoves (the ones i've seen, at least) which could be fired with the coal they were still burning when i was a boy, although diesels were taking over--every railyard had heaps of coal, though. Anyone who has ever relied upon a pot bellied stove for heat knows you can cook on them, too. We had a small cabin in the woods by a lake, and my grandmother would cook up a meal in cast iron skillets on such a stove.
I think the stove you are referring to was called a "monkey stove" it was like a pot bellied stove except shorter and usually had a 4 lid flat top

http://www.seldomfound.com/lib/image.asp?ImageID=130419&ImageType=2
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 05:48 pm
@dyslexia,
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_nZi5RV6izE8/Sb8EFZqaQWI/AAAAAAAAAQo/1devVZa-yMo/s320/36+stove.jpg
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 05:49 pm
@djjd62,
Laughing B&O brings back memories. We used to dare each other to enter this tunnel at Harpers Ferry. Flattened a lot of pennies on the tracks.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/d/d0/Columbian_%28B%26O%29_train.jpg/300px-Columbian_%28B%26O%29_train.jpg
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 05:55 pm
@panzade,
i wish i could find a list of the acronyms and alternate meanings, some of them were pretty cool

used to see a lot of these come through our town

http://mysite.mweb.co.za/residents/grela/cs0104chessie.jpg

Chesapeake & Ohio/Chessie System
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 05:57 pm
@dyslexia,
Naw . . . this is the kind i'm talking about:

http://www.charlesfake.com/pot.belly.stove.jpg

I don't think you could have fit the kind of stove you show into a caboose--leastways, not and be able to walk past in the winter without burning yourself. The kind i'm showing here is what we had in our "cabin." Originally, it was a milk shed, and that's railroad, too. Dairy farmers would deliver milk to the milk shed, and stack up the milk cans in them . . .

http://www.pastandpresents.net/pictures/misc/milk%20can.jpg

The milk train would come through first thing in the morning, and pick up the milk cans. They were still doing that when i was a boy, and my grandmother would get a can of milk off the train a couple of days a week. Later, of course, diesel trucks took over that operation.

As you can see, there ain't much to a milk shed . . .

http://aabc.bc.ca/aabc/delta/gallery/8052_053.jpg

My grandfather bought one from some farmers after the milk trains stopped running, and hauled it up to the lake. We used it for a few years, and then my grandfather build another large room on one side, and the milk shed became the kitchen for our cozy little house in the woods.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 05:58 pm
@djjd62,
My grandfather worked for the C, B & Q.
0 Replies
 
Reyn
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 06:00 pm
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

There will be no central theme in this thread. I plan to post whatever interests me. A little music, a news article, poems, stories - Whatever.

Did you forget about THIS THREAD already? Wink Laughing
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 06:01 pm
damn i love utah phillips

0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 06:03 pm
@djjd62,
Yeah...the ol' chessie
0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 06:13 pm
My grandfather was born in Rockvale Colo in 1883. He went to work for the CrippleCreek-Florence narrow gauge railroad in 1896 as a fireman's assistant, Tossing logs into the boiler of a woodburning locomotive. He continued working most all of the narrow gauge rr's in colorado including the Telluride-Gunnison and then on the standard gauge until about 1923 when he lost his arm in a rr accident east of Trinidad Co.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 06:15 pm
My grandfather was born the year after your grandfather went to work for the railroad, in 1897. He signed on to the extra board until he got a full-time job in 1913, at the age of 16. He studied and became a telegrapher, and ended his career as a station master and telegrapher. It was good work to get--he worked steady all through the Great Depression.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Jun, 2009 06:16 pm
Rock Salt & Nails



Rock Salt & Nails is a great Utah Phillips song but I don't think he ever recorded it. This is a version by Bobby Neuwirth, Bob Dylans runnin buddy recorded in 1967
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 06/20/2019 at 05:11:18