farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Mar, 2009 12:36 pm
@sozobe,
you like fresh beets eh?
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 18 Apr, 2009 02:56 pm
Im having a bit of a concern. When they say that you shouldnt plant potatoes near tomatoes (companion do'd and donts" How far away is far enough? Im planning to do some tomatoes in the same garden where I have my peas, mesclun, carrots, onions, and taters now growing. The garden is about 60 ft by 35 ft
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sat 18 Apr, 2009 08:48 pm
@farmerman,
http://www.ext.nodak.edu/county/cass/horticulture/vegetables/companion.htm

Quote:
POTATOES

Companions: Beans, cabbage family, corn, eggplant, pea
Enemies: Tomatoes and potatoes are attacked by the same blight.
Allies: Horseradish, planted at the corners of the potato patch, provides general protection.
Marigold deters beetles.


http://gardening.about.com/od/totallytomatoes/qt/Tomato-Companions.htm

Quote:
Eggplant, Peppers and Potatoes - These plants are in the same family as tomatoes and are all susceptible to early and late blight, which will build up in the soil and get worse each year. Avoid planting them near each other or in place of each other for at least 3 years. Also planting tomatoes near potatoes can make the potatoes more susceptible to potato blight.


This one addresses the distance question. Read through the whole thread for various opinions and experiences:

http://www.ubcbotanicalgarden.org/forums/showthread.php?t=7005

Here's some more detail on the hybrid that is being experimented with and how to do it yourself:

http://www.allaboutstuff.com/garden_tips/Potato_Tomato_Space_Savers.asp

farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Apr, 2009 02:23 am
@Butrflynet,
wow, It looks like Im going to have to till and create a separate tomato garden because the potatoes :anywhere near" a tomato will spread a late blight. OY, so Ive already planted a row of potatoes. This will be the last year for homegrown potatoes for me. DAMMIT.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Apr, 2009 10:11 am
@farmerman,
But do your tomatoes get blight? I've never gotten that..

planting tomatoes near potatoes making potatoes more susceptible to potato blight.. that I don't have any experience with..


0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Apr, 2009 10:18 am
@farmerman,
my neighbor "spud" grows his taters in a separate patch on the side of his garage, about 50 feet from his main garden.

I can ask him why when I see him later...
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Apr, 2009 04:09 pm
@Rockhead,
did you ask him? did you ask him? Ideas from Experience is my goal. I know that taters and maters arent friendly. I need to know how far apart I need them to be. Ive already planted taters in myusual garden and this year (according to Butterfly , I needed to consider the future removal ofall solenacea in that garden for at least 3 years)
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Apr, 2009 04:27 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

did you ask him? did you ask him? Ideas from Experience is my goal. I know that taters and maters arent friendly. I need to know how far apart I need them to be. Ive already planted taters in myusual garden and this year (according to Butterfly , I needed to consider the future removal ofall solenacea in that garden for at least 3 years)
well FM I can only go on my experience but my veggie garden was about 75 x 30 ft, and I had maters and spuds in the same garden year after year. probably in the neighborhood of 15 to 20 ft apart with cukes and onions between. I never had a problem. my other garden was 150 x 30 but only had blue-lake green beans, cantelope(between the rows of corn) and country gentleman white sweet corn in that one.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Apr, 2009 04:35 pm
@dyslexia,
I'd be inquiring about how prevalent these blights/viruses are in your county before I got my overalls in a twist.

I guess the question is do you have to remove the spuds to ward off evil? Is evil immanent from the tomatoes having been there?
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Apr, 2009 05:27 pm
I'm more of a "what the hell" gardener than a serious gardener and only try because just about everything grows here with very little effort.

This is the first year I have tried potatoes and I also have tomatoes -- they're seperated by peas, cucumbers, carrots, onions and corn (in that order) (thanks to farmerman and Green Witch for pointing me towards companion planting on a previous thread). My garden is pretty small about 6x46 the potatoes and tomatoes are a little more than halfway apart, so maybe 25 feet.

I'll let you know how they fare!

I just read that corn and tomatoes don't go together but I hope nobody tells my garden because I planted them next to each other last year and they both did fine.

Also, I use spinach and greens and lettuce as boarder planting. It looks really pretty!
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Apr, 2009 05:56 pm
@boomerang,
Ive always been a copanion planter . Anytime I grow a melon or cucurbit type plant, I always plant radishes among them. It drives the borers and wilt away. Also marigolds (the marigoldier the smell the better) chase away nematodes and aphids and other sucking bugs>

However, I swear Ive never heard of the Potato tomato "unfriendliness" . Mostly, I giuess, because Ive rarely planted taters except when I had a much larger garden (50'X100') or about 0.1 of an acre. So i guess I just lucked out then, since tomatoes and pottoes are planted at different times here, and I always grew my taters to be plucked out as small red "new potato" sizes, I guess I missed the blight.

Now I have to consider resting certain areas for a few years so that tomatoes arent grown in the same spot
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Apr, 2009 08:05 pm
@farmerman,
yes, I asked him, but I hadda go golf 9 holes before I got back.

he says he never heard of it, but his taters have always been separate. (he starts them WAY early, and already has plants popped up in the straw)

and I always moved my maters around, cuz they use up the soil real good...
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Apr, 2009 09:45 pm
I know that tomatoes should never be planted in the same row for two years back to back , (VFTN) and blights.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Apr, 2009 05:28 pm
@farmerman,
Is brocolli raab the same thing as mustard or rape greens. They sell brocolli raab at the market for 5 bucks a pound . That is outrageous (even though this is a singularly delicious veggie)
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Apr, 2009 05:48 pm
@farmerman,
raab, rape, and rapini are the same (I think) - mustard greens diff, but may be in same famiglia.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Apr, 2009 05:57 pm
@farmerman,
wiki says no

Quote:
Rapini (also known as Broccoli Rabe (or Raab), Broccoletti, Broccoli di Rape, Cime di Rapa, Rappi, Friarielli (in Naples), and Grelos) is a common vegetable in Galician, Chinese, Italian, and Portuguese cuisine. The plant is a member of the Brassiceae tribe of the Brassicaceae, whose taxonomy is very difficult. Rapini is classified scientifically as Brassica rapa subspecies rapa, in the same subspecies as the turnip, but has had various other designations, including Brassica rapa ruvo, Brassica rapa rapifera, Brassica ruvo, Brassica campestris ruvo.

Rapini has many spiked leaves that surround a green bud which looks very similar to a small head of broccoli. There may be small yellow flowers blooming from the buds, which are edible.

The flavor of rapini has been described as nutty, bitter, pungent, and "an acquired taste". The Italian cultivar is similar to, but much more bitter than, the Chinese. The Chinese cultivar is of a lighter green color, not at all bitter or pungent, and more tender.

Rapini is a source of vitamins A, C, and K, as well as potassium, calcium, and iron.

The vegetable probably descends from a wild herb, a relative of the turnip, that grew either in China or the Mediterranean region. It is similar in shape to the Chinese Brassica oleracea cultivar called kai-lan.

Rapini is now grown throughout the world. Rapini is available all year long, but its peak season is fall to spring in the Northern Hemisphere.

Rapini is commonly used in traditional Barese and southern Italian cuisine.


the first time I had rapini in a way I enjoyed was in an Italian resto on the UES with blatham and lola and one of lola's daughters. I discovered that rapini is wonderful when prepared simply.

http://www.canadianliving.com/food/in_season/delicious_fall_rapini_recipes.php

Beet Rapini Risotto
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Apr, 2009 08:05 pm
@ehBeth,
"A source of vitamin K" OHHH ****. Im still on my coumadin therapy so Im gonna screw up my counts by eating raab. The stuff looks and tastes just like wild mustard that I was wondering whether we were just being "uptowned" by food critics.
We m ake raab in a mild sauce made up of butter chicken broth and PEPSI. Sounds silly but the PEPSI adds just a nice sweetness (not sugar free -please!)

I looked up brassica rapa rapa and got a conflicting wikipedia entry that says that Rappini and field mustard ARE the same planthttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brassica_rapa
0 Replies
 
 

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