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WINTER COMES TO ENGLAND, LONDON AUTHORITIES FREEZE UP

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Feb, 2009 07:42 am
@patiodog,
As said, here in Germany you must have winter tires when driving in wintry conditions (The lack of Winter tires will be judged as a significant factor in judging which driver is at fault in a traffic incident or road accident: plus, no winter tires might invalid the motor insurance then.)

The use of winter tires is mandatory by law in Austria, Switzerland, Finland, Latvia, Norway, Sweden, Slovenia.In other countries - like Italy and France - you are obliged to use them when when the authorities/traffic signs request it.


0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Tue 3 Feb, 2009 07:59 am
By the way, going back to the dull-witted assumption that a heavy fall of snow is evidence against climate change ("global warming"), an observation or two is in order. Snow is not necessarily a product of a uniform decrease in temperature globally, in the hemisphere or even regionally. For example, if one's local area is under a blanket of cold, arctic air, and a warm, moist air mass from subtropical regions moves in, you'll get snow--not in spite of, but precisely because the temporary local conditions are warming up.

The "British" Isles enjoy an advantage which affects all of western Europe, and that is the arrival of the Gulf Stream, complete with warm, moist subtropical weather. In fact, the Gulf Stream runs smack dab into the west coast of Ireland (which explains continual episodes of rainfall during mostly sunny days in that region). So, if there were an increasing global average temperature, that might in fact lead to more snow if it means an increase in the incidence of weather fronts of warm, moist air reaching western Europe from subtropical regions, in the winter when arctic air masses tend to settle over the continent.

Right now, a cold, dry arctic air mass is moving into town, slamming into the (relatively) warm, moist air mass which was sitting over the town for the last few days. That means more snow, so i need to go out to commune once more with the shovel.
Deckland
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Feb, 2009 01:08 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

By the way, going back to the dull-witted assumption that a heavy fall of snow is evidence against climate change ("global warming"), an observation or two is in order.
[snip]
[snip]
That means more snow, so i need to go out to commune once more with the shovel.

I see you missed that the comment was tongue in cheek.
As always it appears you like to shovel more than snow.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Feb, 2009 01:09 pm
@Deckland,
I'll simply yield to you the palm in shovelling ****.
Deckland
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Feb, 2009 01:11 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

I'll simply yield to you the palm in shovelling ****.

Gee that was quick Set .. you must be online hahaha.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Feb, 2009 01:13 pm
One minute . . . well i'll be go to Hell . . . that was quick!
Deckland
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Feb, 2009 01:15 pm
@Setanta,
Oh well, I 'm off to work now ..
cheers Deckland
0 Replies
 
Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Feb, 2009 01:28 am
Well, at least they'll be drinking beer at the correct temperature for once.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Feb, 2009 02:27 am
@Setanta,
Quote:
Take for instance the following unique root words describing snow: slush, blizzard, skift, and flurry


The last three, and the second to last one isn't 'skifta, it's 'skiff', describe conditions, not snow.

How many words for snow does English actually have?

slush
sleet
corn
powder
bottomless (powder)
[absolute ecstasy, those last three, in reverse order]
sierra cement
liqid gold
corduroy
[also pretty sweet. but it just don't compare to corn, powder and bottomless]
angel dust


0 Replies
 
The Pentacle Queen
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Feb, 2009 03:33 am
Ok, I'm bored of the snow now. It should go away.
I got bored of it yesterday when I tried to get out of my house and fell over about 5 times on the pavement-come ice rink.
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Feb, 2009 08:32 am
@The Pentacle Queen,
Put on some proper boots, woman!
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Feb, 2009 01:53 pm
@nimh,
Or these, on your shoes/boots/runners/... .

http://www.polarcleats.com/
0 Replies
 
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Feb, 2009 02:02 pm
@Deckland,
Over all things are getting warmer, but the real problem is that things are getting more extreme and unpredictable. Snow where there is not usually snow, hot blazing temperatures in areas that usually stay cool. A major problem for humans is how do you grow food when you don't know what will happen with the weather? We have grown food for thousands of years based on fairly steady frost dates and temperature ranges within geographical zones. If we lose this predictability we may lose our stable food supply.

A little PS - the best way to judge if humans can change the temperature of their environment is to look at cities vs. the countryside. Cities are always hotter due to human activity, auto density and buildings; nearby countryside is always cooler. The earth is becoming much more of a city and much less of countryside. We are creating environment that creates heat.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Feb, 2009 02:22 pm
@Green Witch,
Quote:
We have grown food for thousands of years based on fairly steady frost dates and temperature ranges within geographical zones. If we lose this predictability we may lose our stable food supply.


This is not entirely true. It is largely true for Eurasia, but not for Africa and the Americas. Plants which were domesticated elsewhere and diffused into Africa could not spread through tropical areas to temperate zones south of the equator, and plants domesticated on the North African coast and in the Sahel could similarly not be diffused across the tropical zones.

The middle east and China both appear to have been the earliest centers of the domestication of plants and animals. Those domesticates were available for diffusion to the east and west because they all essentially arose in the northern temperate zone, and could therefore thrive almost anywhere else in the northern temperate zone. The most important factors were the length of the day, and when the rains come. Climate change is not going to affect the length of the day. It is possible, but it is not inevitable, that the rainfall patterns could change. Plants which were attuned to winter rainfall (such as the two types of wheat, barley and the pulse crops of the middle east) cannot be spread to areas which have summer rainfall. So, for example, the plants domesticated by the Bantu south of the equator in Africa were domesticated in a summer rainfall area. They did not migrate beyond the Fish River, because although southern Africa has a typical mediterranean temperate zone climate such as is found in the middle east and the Sahel, that means winter rainfall, and the plants domesticated by the Bantu south of the equator were attuned to a summer rainfall.

Frosts don't actually have much to do with the spread of domesticated plant foods, except that it was necessary to develop strains of those plants which came to fruition in a shorter growing season. The major "suite" of middle eastern crops were all plants which could be so adapted, and harvest precedes the frost. That was actually not all that difficult because the length of daylight in "higher" (i.e., more northern in the northern hemisphere) temperate zone regions increases more rapidly in those areas, and the length of daylight at the solstice is much greater--so the domesticated plants adjusted fairly quickly (a few thousand years in the absence of intelligent agronomic manipulation). With the agronomic technology we have today, the ability to quickly respond to changing climactic conditions means that solutions can be found in a lot less time than the thousands of years it seems to have taken to adapt middle eastern or central China domesticates to more northern or more southern areas of the temperate zone.

The problems climate change will create for crops is that areas which are now optimal because of rainfall patterns may become too arid for the crops now being grown there. But at the same time, areas which are now too arid may become candidates for intensive agriculture. At the time of Caesar Augustus, North Africa and Egypt were the breadbasket of the empire. It might be difficult for the rather low tech farmers of North Africa and Egypt to adjust if their climate becomes wetter, but i'm sure the prospect of profits will reconcile them to the difficulties. The bigger problem will the the economic dislocation of food producers in the current intensive agriculture areas of the world, if rainfall patterns alter sufficiently to endanger their livelihoods.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Feb, 2009 06:51 pm
skipping along, I just saw this -

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/heaviest-snow-for-30-years--stops-britain-in-its-tracks-1570692.html

"Parts of the south-west of England and Wales could see up to 5cm of snow today but forecasters warned that the real problem will be black ice on the roads as temperatures dropped to -6C last night."
This via - http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/heaviest-snow-for-30-years--stops-britain-in-its-tracks-1570692.html



I guess I'll have to reread the whole thread. I don't see how they can be serious.


0 Replies
 
 

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