7
   

How secure are online purchases?

 
 
littlek
 
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2008 05:52 pm
After this last virus, and long recovery, I am scared to check my bank account online. If a bank website is hyper-secure, what might data gathering viruses see if I typed in passwords to access my account online? What about buying on ebay with a service like paypal?
 
View best answer, chosen by littlek
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2008 06:17 pm
@littlek,
I'll be awaiting the answer. Except for one extremely slow shipper, I haven't had a single problem buying online, but this is clearly a separate question.
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2008 06:49 pm
@roger,
I was annoyed because when I reverted back to an older version of my computer format, it came with a bit of malware. I deleted, it came back. I finally wiped my strored data, dumped my recycle bin, etc and it is gone. So, I payed for the yarn I won on ebay and checked my bank acct. Yay!
Thomas
  Selected Answer
 
  4  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2008 06:59 pm
@littlek,
littlek wrote:
If a bank website is hyper-secure, what might data gathering viruses see if I typed in passwords to access my account online?

If the bank's website is secure, and if your own computer is virus-free, they will exchange data over an encrypted connection. (If a web address begins with "https://", that means the connection is encrypted.) A virus in the middle will pick up the encrypted gibberish.

In principle, attackers can decrypt this gibberish. But in practice they won't, because decryption is expensive in computing power. From their perspective, the best line of attack isn't against the bank's computer or the connection. It's to get on your hard drive.

Once the attackers have a virus on your hard drive, they can monitor your keystrokes and read your screen. Whatever you know about your bank account, they can find out, too. So the key to securing your bank transactions is to keep your computer virus free. If you manage to do that, and if your bank exchanges account information through encrypted web pages, you're fine. (I know Ebay and PayPal do encrypt their transactions.)
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  2  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2008 07:14 pm
@littlek,
Hi K,

Encryption technologies are rock solid. In theory they can be broken, but in reality it's not worth anyone's effort to crack codes for average web users.

But if you're computer has (or may have) a virus running which is capturing key-strokes and reporting them to someone, then you are at big risk.

You need to make SURE your machine is clean, and then make sure it stays that way. Both of those things are tough to feel comfortable with when using Windows as the OS.

littlek
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2008 07:25 pm
@rosborne979,
Thanks guys. I scanned with malwarebytes which was recommended software at techie sites. It found no threats after I dumped stored data and my recycle bin. I feel pretty safe right now. My system is armed to the teeth.
mags314772
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2008 07:52 pm
@littlek,
Over the last five years, I have used paypal to buy on ebay more than 500 times with no problems. I also have my bank account online, with no problem.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 3 Dec, 2008 10:24 pm
@littlek,
littlek wrote:
My system is armed to the teeth.

Hear hear! (Italo-Western flute music starts playing to mark the coming showdown.)
0 Replies
 
Deckland
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Dec, 2008 12:42 am
If you use Firefox as a browser, you can add " KEYSCRAMBLER" which encrypts your key strokes.
Quote:
Q: Why do I need KeyScrambler?

A: Keyloggers are the fastest growing form of information theft on the Internet. They invade users' computers through viruses, worms, and other malware, which silently log keystrokes to steal usernames and passwords. The stolen information is then used to steal money and identity from the victims. By having KeyScrambler encrypt everything you type on your computer, you're protected against both known and unknown keyloggers.

FAQ s here ...
http://www.qfxsoftware.com/KeyScrambler/KeyScrambler_FAQ.htm
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Dec, 2008 08:11 am
@littlek,
You can also install a personal firewall, which allows you to select which programs are allowed to initiate connections. This way, even if a virus invades your system, it cannot transmit any of the information it gathers.

Unfortunately, it requires you to know which programs you want to allow out. This is easy for most home users (iTunes, Firefox, IE, etc.), but difficult for corporate environments.

You can find older versions of Tiny Personal Firewall (newer versions aren't free), ZoneAlarm has a free firewall, or just search "free personal firewall" on Google.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

So I just joined Facebook.... - Discussion by DrewDad
YouTube Is Doomed - Discussion by Shapeless
Internet disinformation overload - Discussion by rosborne979
Participatory Democracy Online - Discussion by wandeljw
OpenDNS and net neutrality - Question by Butrflynet
Internet Explorer 8? - Question by Pitter
 
  1. Forums
  2. » How secure are online purchases?
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 08/20/2019 at 12:08:52