Asherman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Nov, 2008 12:04 am
@Mr Stillwater,
Obama went to Harvard, not Yale. Skull and Bones is strictly a Yale fraternity. Hence, Obama clearly isn't Skull and Bones.

One might be a member of both fraternities, but not necessarily. Freemasonry has very high standards for selecting members. Within the fraternity there are no "legacy" memberships, each man must freely ask for admittance to our order, be recommended by members in good standing, and pass a background investigation. A home visit is made to the applicant to meet and talk with his family. Felons and those with serious mental/emotional problems are excluded. A man's reputation and honor must be unsullied and clean. The Lodge will vote on whether to accept a candidate, and a single black ball is enough to deny membership. Once accepted as a candidate, the applicant will be put though a lengthy period where he will be working with a mentor very closely to learn certain elements of our craft. No member, or candidate for membership is ever asked to do anything that would bring dishonor, discredit. or embarrassment to himself, his family, community or nation. We do not haze candidates, but work assist a man in becoming better for himself, his family and country. The process is intense and uncompromising, and for that reason when we meet a fellow Mason anywhere and anytime, we know that we are dealing with a man who can be trusted implicitly.

Many of the nation's Presidents have been Masons and among the Founding Fathers, Washington and Franklin were only two of the most illustrious members of our order. I do not know if Sen. McCain or his father, or grandfather were Masons, but wouldn't be surprised if they were. Masonic membership has not been uncommon amongst US military men, especially within the officer corps. Many distinguished men from all walks of life have been members, and membership isn't secret. Masons are at the forefront of many community betterment efforts. We support hospitals, orphanages, rest homes for the aged and disabled, and many other charitable efforts.

It is quite true that our membership has declined, and the average age of our membership is getting older every year. This is true of most fraternal organizations these days, since young men are no longer drawn to "joining" with others in formal fraternal organizations. Earlier in this thread someone said that in New England, Freemasons are advertising for members. Wow! That's news to me, just a little bit shocking, and I'm not sure many Masons will approve of the idea. I rather doubt that will become an accepted practice with Grand Lodges elsewhere.

BTW, My father, grandfather, and several great grandfathers were Masons. On the other hand neither of my sons has shown any interest in joining. It would please me if they did, but it would be improper to urge it upon them. If they come to see the value of becoming Masons, I'll be the first to sign their applications.
Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Nov, 2008 01:26 am
@Asherman,
Quote:
Re: Mr Stillwater (Post 3459757)
Obama went to Harvard, not Yale. Skull and Bones is strictly a Yale fraternity. Hence, Obama clearly isn't Skull and Bones.


What part of 'irony' don't you get, mate?

Proposition A. Mr Obama appears to be of African descent
Proposition B. These organisations do not recruit Afro-Americans
Proposition C. Thus, it could be ascertained that:
Sub-proposition C:Alpha. Mr Obama could not then be a present, or past, member of the Skull & Bones Fraternity or an adherent of Freemasonry
Sub-proposition C:Beta. Mr Stillwater was employing a particular idiom, irony*, to juxtapose the fact that Mr Obama's lack of these 'connections' would make him unfit to be the choice of the ruling classes of the US of A who are members of S&B and the Masons


Frankly, Asherman - you used to be on the ball.

Webster's Dictionary defines 'irony':
*2 a: the use of words to express something other than and especially the opposite of the literal meaning b: a usually humorous or sardonic literary style or form characterized by irony c: an ironic expression or utterance
LionTamerX
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Nov, 2008 05:33 am
@Mr Stillwater,
You are incorrect in your second provisional assumption, or proposition, as you call it.
0 Replies
 
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Nov, 2008 11:58 pm
@Mr Stillwater,
Rev. Jesse Jackson, and some well known black Jazz musicians are freemasons. Of course, there is always the possibility of having celebrity freemasons for good public relations and they could just be honorary members bypassingthe rigorous trials and time consuming process.
0 Replies
 
Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Nov, 2008 02:30 am
Quote:
A problem quickly arose for black men wishing to become Masons in the newly formed United States: the members of a Lodge must agree unanimously in an anonymous vote to accept a petitioner to receive the degrees. As a consequence of the unanimity requirement, if just one member of a lodge did not want black men in his Lodge, his vote was enough to cause the petitioner's rejection. Thus, although exceptions did exist, Masonic Lodges and Grand Lodges in the United States generally excluded African Americans.
Wikipedia


So they could join a 'Negroes-only' Lodge.... and freely drink from 'Colored' water fountains. Yep, I see fraternalism all over that.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  2  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2008 11:26 pm
@Letty,
Letty, Edgar Allan Poe was, in a sense, making a pun when he identified Montressor as a Mason in the Cask of Amontillado. The irony intended here, of course, is that the narrator is about to do a mason's work, entombing his unfortunate victim in a brick-and-mortar grave. Poe himself was not a Mason and his description of making secret passes with a trowel, etc. are strictly from the author's own fertile mind.
Letty
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Nov, 2008 07:12 am
@Merry Andrew,
I understand that, M.A. but the opening line:

"The thousand injuries of Fortunato I had borne as best I could; but when he ventured upon insult, I vowed revenge."

I assumed that "the insult" had to do with the fact Montressor was not a member of the freemasons, and consequently not worthy of consideration. In other words, low class.
0 Replies
 
Deckland
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Nov, 2008 01:01 pm
The Freemasons are not a secret society.
They maybe a society with secrets, but not a secret society.
How important is that tid bit ? Who knows ..just my 2 cents worth.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Nov, 2008 01:43 pm
@2PacksAday,
Good one, 2Packs.

My cousin's husband is a Mason, and I don't think his acceptance had anything to do with his father. I'll ask him, next time the subject comes up.
Asherman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Nov, 2008 02:10 pm
@ossobuco,
Osso, your cousin's husband had to apply for membership and go through the same vetting process as every other member of our Fraternity. I'm sure that if his father was a member, he was pleased with his son's choice. Dad almost certainly would have gladly signed the application recommending his son for membership, but the relationship would have had nothing to do with acceptance of rejection of the application. Even acceptance of the application doesn't guarantee membership. Each candidate must pass a rigorous test before being admitted to each of the three degrees of membership in a Blue Lodge. Some can't do it, and never become members.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Nov, 2008 02:25 pm
@2PacksAday,
Maybe you ain't free . . . but i heerd you was cheap and easy . . .
0 Replies
 
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Nov, 2008 04:43 pm
Even a "mason" should be "free" to decide if their God is good or evil.

I guess it always comes down to personal choice, truthfulness and virtue.
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Nov, 2008 07:02 am
@RexRed,
RexRed wrote:

Even a "mason" should be "free" to decide if their God is good or evil.

I guess it always comes down to personal choice, truthfulness and virtue.
Quote:
The more we find out about the freemasonry, the more we convince ourselves how evil this organization is. Disguised in the beautiful colours of a charitable and mutual charity society, freemasonry reveals itself at a closer approach in its true light, that of a satanic sect.
Freemasonry is not a satanic sect. It is not a religion.

edit RexRed did not write above quote, just included it to show how some people think
RexRed
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Nov, 2008 01:02 pm
@Steve 41oo,
Quote:
Freemasonry is not a satanic sect. It is not a religion.

edit RexRed did not write above quote, just included it to show how some people think


My father was a 33 degree mason of the Scottish Rite (Ordo Ab Chao) and my mother was a worthy matron in the Eastern Star.

And you can continue to believe your fantasy if you like.

I have personally been to the secret meetings many times, I have seen and handled the books “written in code”, and I was taught masonry by my father.

I didn't learn Free Masonry by reading Wikipedia…

Deus Meumque Jus = "God and my right"
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2008 06:12 am
@RexRed,
RexRed wrote:
...And you can continue to believe your fantasy if you like.


I dont know what fantasy it is you think I believe. I was illustrating the absurd ideas of some who think freemasonry is a satanic cult.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2008 07:32 am
http://askafreemason.com/
OGIONIK
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Nov, 2008 07:38 am
@Merry Andrew,
so what the **** is freemasonry about?

are their dues? if so haha its a scam.

everyone loves feeling elite, "in the circle"

the best way to start an organization is set extremely ridiculous standards to join, make severyone want to be "accepted"

My apologies if it actually ahs some use or point, but ive never heard one thing about wtf masons do.

sit around and talk? or what?
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Nov, 2008 10:17 am
@OGIONIK,
Yes, there are dues. Masons do a lot of charitable work. The Shriner Burns Institute, for example, which does treatment of burn victims and research, is strictly a Masonic undertaking. But the one to ask is Asherman, not me. I'm no widow's son.
OGIONIK
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Nov, 2008 11:12 am
@Merry Andrew,
haha masons are a scam for money.

damn im good. always straight to the point
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Nov, 2008 10:55 am
@OGIONIK,
OGIONIK wrote:

so what the **** is freemasonry about?

are their dues? if so haha its a scam.

everyone loves feeling elite, "in the circle"

the best way to start an organization is set extremely ridiculous standards to join, make severyone want to be "accepted"

My apologies if it actually ahs some use or point, but ive never heard one thing about wtf masons do.

sit around and talk? or what?
no we sit around on a2k all day and take careful note of the anti masonic posters...for future reference
0 Replies
 
 

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