287
   

What BOOK are you reading right now?

 
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Mon 20 Jan, 2014 06:53 am
@spendius,
unless you have a herd of 250 ewes , 70% of which have decided to begin delivering lambs during this time of year,
My sleepless weeks have begun.
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jan, 2014 07:10 am
@farmerman,
My success at what I did has delivered me from such agonies. There are too many old cocks who can't allow room for the youngsters to get their chance.
0 Replies
 
Olivier5
 
  2  
Reply Mon 20 Jan, 2014 10:45 am
@farmerman,
Quote:
I would have written a shorter letter, but I did not have the time.

Good one.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Tue 21 Jan, 2014 01:09 pm
Nostalgia
https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/t1/1535735_576064375813618_636998420_n.jpg
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Jan, 2014 02:24 pm
@edgarblythe,
WOW! Good one. I read a Chandler book a year; even if I don't need to.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  3  
Reply Tue 21 Jan, 2014 02:35 pm
@edgarblythe,
That's a book. Are you sure you're in the right thread?
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Jan, 2014 06:32 pm
Franklin Toker

FALLINGWATER RISING

Quote:
Fallingwater Rising is the biography of the most famous American house of the twentieth century--Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater, culled from hundreds of interviews, letters, and contemporary references by an internationally recognized specialist in the history of architecture.

When he got the commission to design the house, in 1934, Wright was nearing 70. He was living in professional isolation, his early fame long gone. Like so many Depression-era Americans, he had no new work in sight. Into his orbit stepped Edgar Kaufmann, a Pittsburgh department-store mogul and philanthropist with the burning ambition to build a world-famous work of architecture.


it was an unlikely collaboration: the Jewish merchant who had no lasting concern for modern architecture and the brilliant modernist who was paranoid about Jews--among many fictive enemies. But the two men produced an extraordinary building of lasting architectural significance that brought international fame to them both, and gained Wright the status of the greatest architect of the twentieth century.


GUIDE for a dozen discussion points that may be helpful to you. Or contact Toker for specific questions, like "What got you started on this book?"

Interest is growing in other foreign editions of FALLINGWATER now that the Chinese edition appeared in 2009. The two countries that are most interested are Japan and Germany. Please contact the author if you have any leads in either of those countries.



Fallingwater Rising is a work that goes far beyond architecture to depict the United States in one of its most desperate eras. Involving key figures of the 1930s like Frida Kahlo, Henry R. Luce, William Randolph Hearst, Albert Einstein, Ayn Rand, and President Franklin Roosevelt, Fallingwater's story shows us how Kaufmann's house became not just Wright's masterpiece but a fundamental icon of American life. Here is popular history at its best.

Fallingwater Rising asks three basic questions:
•By what process did Wright create the design?
•What drove Kaufmann, an architectural conservative, to suddenly embrace such a radical and risky project?
•And why, having together created one of the most important houses of the twentieth century, could Wright and Kaufmann never build anything again?
[/ quote]

:from Tokers marketing web page .

It was Kauffman who got WRight out of his 10 year self imposed isolation (based upon his fragile ego). s was said of him by a noted architect in the 1920's. "Wright I one of our best 19th century architects. THAT pissed Wright off mightily.

The "marketing" of Fallingwater nationally and internationally was what Kauffman had on his mind when he began the stormy partnership with WRight,.

Often "Creative Fiction" is as interesting as a telephone book or is rife with cow dung. This one is as well researched and documented as any science text and is quite a page turner (Unlike Lincoln-A Life)
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Jan, 2014 08:13 pm
@farmerman,
That sounds exhausting. Do you have any help during all those births? I've never lived or worked on a farm, so forgive me if this is a stupid question, but are you able to keep the newly born lambs safe from predators? I don't know what I'm thinking, I can't imagine you have a facility that can house all the Ewes. I'm hopeless when it comes to visualizing how all the business gets done.

Skipping to another topic, a friend gave me a copy of "Mexico City Blues", when I was about 11. None of us understood the poetry, it just struck us funny. I can still remember part of one poem that began, ahem:
I caught a cold
from the sun
When they tore my heart out
At the top of the pyramids

O the ruttle tooty blooty

windowpoopies
of Fellahin Ack Ack
Town that russet noon
When priests dared
To lick their lips
Over my thumping meat
Heart

The other young girl who gave me the book said it belonged to her uncle who was a beatnik. None of the rest of us knew a real Beatnik, but Kerouac poetry persuaded us that these guys were fried. A grown up actually got a word 'windowpoopies' published in a book. We were too young to realize we were reading something of major import, sadly I guess I still am. I think it was called 13th Chorus. Our English teacher, Sister Ann Teresa never thought it was something she needed to introduce.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Jan, 2014 08:25 pm
@glitterbag,
That's impressive, that you're able to remember a poem when you were 11.
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Jan, 2014 08:38 pm
@RonPrice,
I tell you what folks, I know there is a new signature line in here somewhere, when I have a spare week or two I'm going to carve out a dazzling nugget and replace my old tired signature with something brilliant.



RonPrice wrote:

If people want to read what I write, ossobuco, they are free to do so. If they don't that is fine too. I post at 100s of internet sites, have literally millions of readers. I have dozens of books now in cyberspace. I am not your occasional writer who posts little snippets for the blogosphere.

Letter writing and literary communication has taken-on a whole new context and meaning in cyberspace for me after some 50 years of writing letters in real space: 1964 to 2014. Since emails emerged by sensible and insensible degrees in the last two decades, 1994 to 2014, literary communication has been revolutionized. In some ways, this new form of literary exchange is not unlike previous decades and centuries when letter writing was one of the major forms of communication in society. At least this has become true for some writers like myself who utilize cyberspace as their central medium of publicizing their literary wares: books and ebooks, essays and posts at internet sites, narrative and expository details and accounts.

I could spend all my time now writing emails: (i) short and pithy, a line or two; (ii) of medium length, say, a paragraph or two, and (iii) long pieces of a page or more. But, since I have other literary interests, since I have reinvented myself in recent years---and am now a writer and author, poet and publisher, editor and researcher, online blogger and journalist, reader and scholar, I try to keep that form of communication, emails and letters, to an absolute minimum.

If old friends wonder why I do not send them the short and snappy emails that I used to send to them at their email address, or at their Facebook page, or at some other internet site, this is the reason. It is a reason I elaborate on in some detail in the paragraphs below. This explanation is, in part at least, part of the general articulation of my business plan, of the literary industry, of my cyberspace MO, that has come to occupy my leisure-time, my retirement years, as I head to the age of 70 in less than 7 months--on 23 July 2014.

If readers here get tired of my posts, as you indicate ossobuco, I will just retire for a week or two, or a month or a year. I do that at many places in cyberspace when people make it clear that they have had enough.-Ron
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  3  
Reply Fri 31 Jan, 2014 09:10 pm
@RonPrice,
RonPrice wrote:

But, since I have other literary interests, since I have reinvented myself in recent years---and am now a writer and author, poet and publisher, editor and researcher, online blogger and journalist, reader and scholar ...


And, so modest, too. Can I go to your 'retirement' party?
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Fri 31 Jan, 2014 10:23 pm
@cicerone imposter,
cicerone imposter wrote:

That's impressive, that you're able to remember a poem when you were 11.


Not really, it just struck us so funny I couldn't get it out of my head. I can still recite a few fractured poems rewritten for Mad Magazine loosely based on the styles of long gone poets. My favorite was a version of Edgar Allen Poe's "The Raven", redone as "the Spaniel". It starts off as, ahem:

Once upon a midnight cautious
As I pondered weak and nauseous
Over advertising copy I would write for Macy's store
Suddenly I heard a yapping, yapping at my chambers door

I can't recall the rest, but the idea is a spaniel shows up and starts to bark inspirational slogans to the copy writer.

My mom allowed me all the Mad magazines my little heart desired, I was the envy of my friends whose wouldn't let them read that "trash"! I had every Mad magazine published from 1958 (?) till the mid 70's. I had to leave them behind as I scrambled to get myself and young son out of harms way. Unfortunately, by the time I could get back for those old mags, my former husband had disposed of them. Not such a big loss compared to what might have happened if I lingered too long for that collection.
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Fri 31 Jan, 2014 11:13 pm
@farmerman,
I love the irony
Kaufman means merchant in Yiddish
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Feb, 2014 04:48 pm
@glitterbag,
Your mom was very wise to let you read what you wanted. I did the same with our children. I took them to the bookstore often, and told them they could choose anything in the store - including comic books. We still have many of those books in storage. Some must be worth a fortune.

The long and short of it is that both our boys did very well in school; summa cum laude and cum laude graduates.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Feb, 2014 04:54 pm
I'm 2/3rds the way through Helen and Troy's Epic Road Quest by A. Lee Martinez. Quite funny. Well written as well.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Mar, 2014 06:48 pm
I put down the play by Alberto Moravia on Beatrice Cenci (promising self to get back to it) because I picked up some books at the Goodwill that are by writers I'm more familiar with, Elmore Leonard and Henning Mankell. Both are older books in their series that I'd missed along the way.

The Elmore Leonard book, KillShot, somehow dragged on for me. Or maybe I've gradually gotten tired of his stories. So good at characters and dialog, though.
Have just started the Mankell book, sucked in already. Title: Side-tracked. Mankell's not bad with either of those either.
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Mar, 2014 06:59 pm
@ossobuco,
Only thing I remember about Killshot was that I learned what a sleever bar was.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Mar, 2014 07:07 pm
@panzade,
Yeah, but I forget already. Like a crow bar but not..
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Mar, 2014 07:29 pm
Started Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Mar, 2014 07:31 pm
@tsarstepan,
Just finished "half broke horses" by Jeannette Wells. Now on to "duty" by Robert Gates
0 Replies
 
 

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